(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the Town of Pelham, New Hampshire"

University of New Hampshiirc 
librairy 



The 1971 Town Report is Dedicated to 



HAVEN A. STROUT 
July 14, 1904 - November 21, 1971 



Who served the To\m of Pelham 

on the Board of Selectmen 

and the Board of Adjustment 



The photographs included in this Report were taken of old Town records 
stored in the Town Hall and Library. If the 1972 Town Meeting should 
appropriate funds to begin microfilming all Town records, the original 
documents will eventually be permanently stored in a vault now in the process 
of being constructed in the Town Hall basement. 



In order to combat, to some extent, the steadily rising costs of 
printing the Town Report, this year's Report was printed by offset photog- 
raphy at a reduced cost, by Quality Press Inc., of Nashua, New Hampshire. 



ANNUAL REPORT 
1971 



TOWN ORGANIZATION 

Detailed Statement of Payments H 

Detailed Statement of Receipts (Treasurer's Report) 5 

Inventory of Valuation - Statemont of Appropriation. ^ 

Minutes of Special Town Meetings 23 

Minutes of Town Meeting* 20 

Officers and Committees 1 



INSERT 



Budget 

Budget Details Colored Pages 

Warrant 



REPORTS 



Board of Adjustment. 27 

Board of Selectmen. • 26 

Building Inspector. 28 

Civil Defense Director 29 

Conservation Commission 32 

Dog Officer 27 

Fire Chief and Warden , 33 

Health Officer 30 

Highway Agent ,,, 35 

Library Trustees 37 

Municipal Court , 40 

Nashua Regional Planning Commission 41 

Police Department 42 

School Department ,, 71 

Tax Collector , , 45 

Trust Funds 62 

Vital Statistics 48 

Water Study Committee 46 

State Audit Report 67 



TOWN OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TO THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
A Russell Harris, Jr 



BALLOT CLERKS 

Theodora Constantin 
Paul Fisher Jr 



James Gannon 
Marilyn Raymond 



Jeannei-te Surprenant 
Charlotte Vautier 



BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 

Willis H Atwood, 1972 James P Emerson, 1975 Chm thru Nov. 

Charles Bernard, 1974 Chm in Dec. Walter Kosik, 1976 Clerk 

Fabien Chiasson, 1973 Haven A Strout, Selectman 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Robert G Edwards 



BUDGET COMMITTEE 

Daniel S Atwood, Jr, 1974 Clerk 
Donald Brock, School Board 
Austin Burns, 1972 
Robert Fisher, 1973 
Robert Fletcher, 1973 
Lawrence Hince, 1972 
Sub-Committee: 
Richard Gudek 



John Lavallee, Selectman 

Anthony Oliver, 1972 (thru Nov.) 

James Powers, 1974 

Marianne Thompson, 1974 Chairman 

James White, 1973 

Lawrence Ormsby, 1972 (rep. Oliver) 

Anthony Zouvelos 



CEMETERY TRUSTEES 

Austin Burns, 1974 
Frank Carleton, 1972 
Charles Herbert, 1973 



Wilmer Paquette, 1974 

Chester Spaulding, 1973 (thru Qpril) 

Walter Wood, 1972 



Emile Martin 1972 (rep. Spaulding) 

CIVIL DEFENSE DIRECTOR 
Maurice E Nantel 



AD HOC COMMITTEE 

Seth Marshall 
Robert Messersmith 
Virginia Rivet 



Rev, Father William Quirk 
Rev. Robert C Robh 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Stephen Baldwin, 1972 
Frederick Bischoff, 1974 
Dow Case, 1973 
John Lavallee, Selectman 



Harry MacPherson, 1972 
Sara Reynolds, 1974 
Churchill Rood, 1974 Chairman 



DOG OFFICER 

Stuart Nash 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Richard C Mansfield, Chief & Warden 

Willis Atwood, Asst Chief & Ward Richard Derby, Fire Ward 

Arnold Balcom, Asst Chief & Ward Richard Melanson, Fire Ward 



FIREMEN 

Daniel Atwood 
Frank Atwood 
Herbert Atwood 
Graham Balcom 
Nathan Boutwell 
Frank Carleton 
Russell Corbin 
Robert M Edwards 
Robert Fletcher 
George Garland 



James Greenwood 
Robert Hirsch 
Charles Hoobbs 
Charles Hobbs III 
Alton Hodgman 
James Holt,Jr 
Edmund Lapoint 
Norman Lawrence, Jr 
Russell Leonard 
Frederick Mansfield 



Frank Melanson 
William Melanson 
Hugh Porter 
Lorin Raymond 
Herbert Richardson, Jr 
Roy Silloway 
David Slater 
Stephen Straughan 
Charles Therriault 



FIRE/POLICE BUILDING COMMITTEE 
Wayne Bariteau 
Richard Derby 



James Garfield, Chairman 
Frank Foisie 



HEALTH OFFICER 

Alton Hodgman 

HIGHWAY AGENT 

George Neskey 



INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 
Richard Gilcreast 
Russell Leonard 



Herbert Madden 
Dean Swift 



Melvin S trav^7bridge, 
Selec tman 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

Lucille Craven, 1974 Sandra Corbin, 1973 



Anne Hince, 19 il 



MEAT INSPECTOR 

Philippe Blanchette 

MODERATOR 

James Fenton 

NASHUA REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION 

Ann Bischoff Clifton Hayes 

OVERSEER OF PUBLIC WELFARE 
James Fenton 



PLANNING BOARD 

Paul Fisher, Jr, 1974 
Lawrence Hince, 1973 Chm 
Mitchell Kopacz,1975 



Joseph Landry, 1975 
Melvin Strawbridge, Sel 



George Tuttle, 1976 

Clerk 
Ronald Walsh, 1972 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Ralph S Boutwell, Chief 
Frank Foisie, Captain 
Alton Hodgman, Lieutenant 
Roland Boucher, Sergeant Full-time 
Wayne Bariteau, Officer Full-time 
William Dowling, Officer Full-time 
Bernard Flanders, Officer Full-time 
Robert Hutchinson, Officer Full-time 
Raymond Malburne, Officer Full-time 



f. 



POLICE SPECIAL OFFICERS 
Willis Atwood 
Frank Carle ton 
Russell Corbin 
Arthur Hanlon 



Albert Harris 
Charles Herbert 
Gottfried Herkomer 
Mitchell Kopacz 



Maurice Nantel 
John Newcomb 
Herbert Richardson 
Roy Silloway 



RECREATION COMMISSION 

Roger Ally, 1972 Robert Messer smith, 1974 Chairman 

Herbert Currier, 1973 James Rowntree, 1972 

Matthew Janos, 1973 (rep. Tracy) Holmes Tracy, 1973 (thru Sept.) 



REPRESENTATIVES TO GENERAL COURT 
Arthur H Peabody 



Miles J Cares (resigned in Dec.) 



ROAD STUDY COMMITTEE 
Donald E Burton 
Ralph Danko 



James Emerson, Selectman 
Leonard Philbrick 



SELECTMEN 

James P Emerson (Dec. only) 
John C Lavallee, 1974 



SUPERVISORS OF CHECK LIST 
Richard Derby, 1974 



Melvin R Strawbridge, 1972 Chm 
Haven A S trout, 1973 (until his 
death in November) 



Dorothy Hardy, 1976 



Edeltraud Seamans,1972 



SURVEYORS OF WOOD & LUMBER 
Charles W Hobbs,Jr 
Donald Landry 



Ellsworth Smith 
Charles Steck 



John Steck 



TAX COLLECTOR 

Cheryl B Rossi 

TOWN CLERK 

Faye B Emerson 

TOWN ENGINEER 

James J Bleistein 



TOWN COMMITTEE, N H HIGHWAY SAFETY COMMITTEE 
Ralph Boutwell, Chairman Albert R Harris 
James Emerson, Selectman John Newcomb 



Grace O'Heam, School 
Maurice Picard 



TREASURER 

Albert R Harris 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 
A Russell Harris, 1972 



Frank Atwood, 1974 



Ruth Richardson, 1973 



UTILITY SUB-COMMITTEE OF CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
Frederick Bischoff Lawrence Hince 



Churchill Rood 



WATER STUDY COMMITTEE 
David Curran 
Joseph DeCarolis 



Robert Fletcher 
Richard Gilcreast 



William Hayes, Chm 
Albert D Nolin 



INVENTORY OF VALUATION - STATEMENT OF APPROPRIATIONS 



57,800 



Valuation of Land 

Buildings 

Factory buildings 

Privately ovmed water supplies 

Gas transmission lines (Tenneco Inc.) 

Electric plants: 

Granite State Electric Co. $893,300 
New England Power Co. 528,500 

Public Service Co. 

Boats (20) 

Total Valuation before Exemptions 

Less: Blind exemptions (3) 

Elderly exemptions (54) 

Net Valuation on which Tax Rate is Computed 

Total Town Appropriations 

Less: Revenues and credits 

Net Town Appropriations 
Net School Appropriations 
County Tax Assessment 

Total Appropriations 

Less: reimbursement a/c property exempted, 1970 session 
Add: war service credits (466) 
overlay 

Property Taxes to be Raised 
Less: actual war service credits 

Taxes Committed to Tax Collector 



TAX RATE 



Municipal government 
County government 
School District 



$ 8,340,200.00 

25,374,300.00 

117,200.00 

50,500.00 

131,450.00 



1,479,600.00 
4,350.00 

$ 35,497,600.00 







3,000.00 
260,100.00 




$ 


35,234^500.00 




$. 


442,421.32 
261,823.39 




$ 
$ 


180,597.93 

1,202,885.87 

49,490.25 


session 


1,432,974.05 

30,595.26 
24,400.00 
10,788.81 




$ 


1,437,567.60 
24,138.60 




$ 


1,413,429.00 


$40.80 

14.7% 

3.4% 

81.9% 







100.0% 



COMPARATIVE TAX RATE PER $1,000 VALUATION 





1967 


1968 


1969 


1970 


1971 


Town 


$13.30 


$13^20 


$ 5.00 


$ 5.90 


$ 6.00 


County 


3.60 


3.50 


1.50 


1.80 


1.40 


School 


64.10 


65.30 


27.70 


29.10 


33.40 



$81.00 



$82.00 



$34.20 



$36.80 



$40.80 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS 



I. General Fund 
Received from: 

Faye B. Emerson, Town Clerk 

1972 Auto Permit Fees 
1971 Auto Permit Fees 

1970 Auto Permit Fees 

1971 Dog Licenses 

1970 Dog Licenses 

1971 Filing Fees 



Cheryl B. Rossi, Tax Collector 

1971 Resident Taxes 

1971 Resident Tax Penalties 

1970 Poll Taxes 

1970 Head Taxes 

1970 Head Tax Penalties 

1971 Yield Taxes 

1970 Yield Taxes 

1971 Property Taxes 
1971 Interest 

1970 Property Taxes 

1970 Interest 

1970 Tax Sale Interest 

Supplem'ental Tax Sale 

Tax Sales Redeemed 

Tax Sales Redeemed, Interest & Costs 

National Bank Stock Tax 



State of New Hampshire 

Business Profits Tax Reimbursement 

Forest Fire Refunds 

Gasoline Tax Reimbursement 

Interest and Dividends Tax 

Law Enforcement Programs 

Meals and Rooms Tax 

Old Age Assistance Recoveries 

Police Dispatch Service Refund 

Police Radio Refund 

Savings Bank Tax 

Tower Land Reimbursement 

Town Road Aid Balance Refund 

Warden's Services 



460.54 

73,474.46 

1,833.27 

1,152.05 

12.60 

19.00 



$ 24,100.00 

91.00 

1,002.00 

2,880.00 

271.00 

754.20 

123.15 

1,287,899.47 

233.29 

116,057.60 

3,107.30 

839.18 

482.34 

13,985.58 

948.27 

.50 



30,595.26 

232.89 

14,223.42 

5,168.24 

550.00 

26,590.20 

566.85 

3,402.00 

1,416.00 

1,444.92 

57.04 

162.63 

80>83 



$ 76,951.92 



1,452,774.88 



84,490.28 



U.S. Government 



Fire Siren Refund 



$ 1,129.96 



$ 1,129.96 



Licenses and Permits 

Beano License 

Bicycle Permits 

Building Permits 

Junkyard Licenses 

License to Sell Explosives 

License to Sell Firearms 

Milk Licenses 

Oil Burner Permits 

Pistol Permits 



10.00 

195.50 

2,949.50 

150.00 

2.00 

2.00 

38.00 

215.00 

150.00 



3,712.00 



Pelham Bank and Trust Company 



Loans in Anticipation of Taxes 
Interest on Certificate of Deposit 



$ 249,274.30 
5,767.66 



255,041.96 



Other Sources 



Ambulance Refunds $ 50.00 

Board of Adjustment Cases 450.00 

Closing Gage Fund 90.33 

Copy Machine Fees 65,00 

Emergency Employment Act 1,076.90 

Grass Fire Refund 18.25 

Insurance Rebates 604.10 

N.H. Jockey Club, Inc. 624.00 

N.H. Trotting and Breeding Association 675.00 

Overpayments Refunds 107.61 

Pelham Municipal Court 1,344.00 

Race Track Reimbursement 72.00 

Rent of Town Equipment 15.00 

Road Bond Forfeit- Mercury Lane 1,500.00 
Road Bond Forfeit Interest- Mercury Lane 304.72 
Sale of Building Regulations & Code Books 64.00 

Sale of Checklists 20.00 

Sale of Cruiser 357.13 

Telephone Commissions 12,35 

Town Hall Rent 292.00 



7,742.39 



TOTAL RECEIPTS 



$ 1,881,843.39 



Cash on Hand, January 1, 1971 

TOTAL 

Less: Selectmen's Orders Paid 

Number of Checks Issued: 3,769 

CASH ON HAND, December 31, 1971 



490,561.40 

$ 2,372,404.79 

1,571,061.87 



801,342.92 



Proof of Balance 



Balance in Pelham Bank and Trust Co. 

Per Statement, December 31, 1971 

Add: Deposits of January 4, 7, 8 

Total 



$ 181,746.77 

37,922.11 

$ 219,668.88 



Less: Outstanding 

Total 

Add: Certificates of Deposit Dated 
December 15, 1971 

Reconciled Balance, December 31, 1971 



18,325.96 



$ 201,342.92 



600,000.00 
$ 801,342.92 















tf,t't'ed ^j 







^/A^*** (^et<ggm> /&^m- 



THE FRONT cover and a page from an early 1800 's Treasurer's book, 
that anyone receiving Tovn funds had to sign personally for them. 



Note 



II. Emergency Employment Act 

Balance, January I, I97I $ 0.00 

Deposits, 1971 1,199.80 

Transferred to General Fund 1,076.90 

Balance, December 31, 1971 $ 122.90 

Proof of Balance 

Balance per statement, December 31, 1971, in 

The Pelham Bank and Trust Company $ 649.52 

Less: Outstanding Checks 526.62 

Reconciled Balance, December 31, 1971 $ 122.90 

1971 Salaries for Employees Hired under the Emergency Employment Act: 

Robert Hutchinson, Police Officer $ 726.90 

A. Russell Harris Jr., Administrative Assistant 350.00 

Total $ 1,076.90 



III. Road Bond Escrow Account 

Balance, January 1, 1971 $ 0.00 

Deposits, 1971 40,735.21 

Expenditures and Transfers 27 , 585. 21 

Balance, December 31, 1971 $ 13,150.00 

Proof of Balance 

Balance per statement, December 31, 1971, in 

The Pelham Bank and Trust Company $ 13,185.21 

Less: Outstanding Check 35.21 

Reconciled Balance, December 31, 1971 $ 13,150.00 



8 



Road Bonds Held by the Town of Pelham, as of December 31, 1971 



Hans Naujoks $ 300.00 

Hilton Homes 1,000.00 

Ken Joc-Eetay Park 9,500.00 

Martin Heights 1,200.00 
Brookview Development 1,000.00 

Hams Naujoks 200.00 

Kimberley Estates 500.00 

Warren Development 2,500,00 

A. E. Dionne 1,050.00 

Sev-A-Tel 3,000.00 

W. & C. Hayes 4,559.21 



Neofotistos Realty $ 600.00 

R. Legasse 600.00 

N. Provencal 2,250.00 

N. Provencal 900.00 



Total 



Balance, Escrow 
Account 

Savings Accounts 
Certificates of 
Deposit 

Total 



$30,659.21 

$13,150.00 

15,259.21 

2,250.00 

$30,659.21 



Fire/Police Station Note Issue 

$ 59,500.00 Payable in 5 Years 3^ Percent Interest 
The Pelham Bank and Trust Company 



Year 
1972 
1973 
1974 
1975 
1976 
Total 



Schedule of Serial Note Payments 
Principal Interest 

$ 12,000.00 $ 2,082.50 



12,000.00 
12,000.00 
12,000.00 
11,500.00 
$ 59,500.00 



1,662.50 

1,242.50 

822.50 

402.50 

$ 6,212.50 



Total 

$14,082.50 

13,662.50 

13,242.50 

12,822.50 

402.50 

$65,712.50 



Comparison Receipts from Five, Ten, and Twenty Years Ago 

1971 1966 1961 1951 
From: 

Town Clerk $ 76,951.92 $ 39,064.28 $ 18,713,35 $ 4,625.53 

Tax Collector 1,452,774.88 613,106.29 271,062.09 78,336.81 

State of N.H. 84,490.28 2,817.92 3,060.45 2,562.04 

Tax Anticipation 

Notes 249,274.30 85,000.00 55,000.00 50,000.00 

Building Permits 2,949.50 1,342.80 439.00 7.00 



Total 

Receipts $1,881,843.39 $746,746.07 $355,637.89 $148,772.86 



Respectfully submitted, 

Albert R. Harris, Treasurer 

A,R. Harris, Jr., Deputy Treasurer 



10 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF PAYMENTS 



APPROPRIATION EXPENDITURES BALANCES OVERDRAFTS 



TOWN OFFICERS' SALARIES 



Leonard Philbrick 
Haven Strout 
Peter Morin 
Arthur Egerton 
Melvin Strawbridge 
John Lavallee 
James Emerson 
Cheryl Rossi 
Faye Emerson 
Albert Harris 
A Russell Harris 
James Fenton 



800.00 

1,300.00 

291.67 

320.83 

726.92 

646.15 

46.15 

3,219.25 

542.30 

1,346.15 

25.00 

375.00 



TOWN OFFICERS' EXPENSES 



$ 6,625.00 $ 9,639.42 $ 



$ 3,014.42 



Selectmen's expenses: 
Leonard Philbrick 
Melvin Strawbridge 
Workshop attended 
Purchases, 30 chairs 

3 used desks & chairs 
Drapery material 
Flowers 
Secretary, Muriel Pelton 

Ann Bischoff 
Telephones 
Office supplies 
Postage 

Repairs to iffice equipment 
Legal notices 
Deeds & mortgages 
Dues, N H Municipal Ass'n 
Purchase of used equipment 
Town Report, printing 

mailing 
Printing dump stickers 
Boat reports 
Ambulance charge 
Special meeting, chairs 
Water tests 

Fire/Police Bldg Comm. exp. 
Town Manager Comm, exp. 
Power Study Comm. exp. 
Miscellaneous 
Budget Comm. , Sec. Corbin 
Trust Funds supplies 
Conservation Comm, , sup. 
postage 



60.00 

85.60 

12.75 

215.80 

330.00 

87.60 

20.60 

5,040.00 

1,691.00 

582.54 

815.90 

302.75 

100.60 

42.09 

193.36 

282.94 

89.94 

2,487.00 

206.24 

139,20 

12.18 

41.00 

50.00 

15.00 

25.25 

104.96 

28.43 

.40 

298.75 

3.00 

18.81 

64.00 



11 



APPROPRIATION EXPENDITURES BALANCES OVERDRAFTS 



Town Clerk: 

Fees paid to Faye Emerson 

Supplies 

Dues 

Postage 
Tax Collector: 

Fees paid to Cheryl Rossi 

Supplies 

Expenses, registry fees 

Dues 

Expenses, Convention 
mileage 

Postage 
Treasurer: 

Supplies 

Postage 
Welfare Agent: 

Supplies 

Exp., paid to Mrs Raymond 
Building Inspector: 

Fees paid to Mr Edwards 

Supplies 



$ 5,152, 


.00 


199. 


.20 


11. 


.00 


113. 


.22 


904, 


.50 


376. 


.72 


123. 


.20 


5, 


,00 


150, 


.00 


13. 


.40 


314. 


.76 


142. 


.10 


145. 


.42 


16. 


.05 


23. 


.00 


2,701. 


,50 


193. 


,11 



MUNICIPAL COURT 



Judge, J Albert Lynch $ 500.00 

Clerk, Edwin Hartz 350.00 

Special Justices 300.00 



$ 23,494.00 $ 24,031.87 $ $ 537.87 



$ 1,150.00 $ 1,150.00 

APPRAISAL OF PROPERTY $ 3,000.00 $ 3,517.26 $ 517.26 

EMPLOYEES' RETIREMENT 

Arthur Peabody $ 1,200.00 

Police Retirement of N H 2,403.00 

Fire Retirement of N H 180.00 



$ 3,910.30 $ 3,783.00 $ 127.30 



ELECTION & R#GISTRATI0N 



Supervisors of Check list: 

Richard Derby $ 125.00 

Dorothy Hardy 125.00 

Edeltraud Seamans 125.00 

Moderator, James Fenton 135.00 

Ballot clerks 200.00 

Counters 15,00 

Supplies 58.80 



12 



APPROPRIATION EXPENDITURES BALANCES 



OVERDRAFTS 



Printing ballots 
Computer service 
Janitor services 
Lunches 
Chair rental 
Stamps & envelopes 



$ 1,250.00 



$ 123. 


.50 


99. 


.38 


202. 


.75 


48. 


.00 


120, 


.00 


5. 


.00 


? 1,382, 


.43 



132.43 



TOWN HALL 



Custodian services 

Cleaning floors & windows 1 

Supplies 

Carpet rental 

Clock maintenance 

Repairs to hall 

Lights 

Telephone alarm 

Fuel, oil 

Plumbing of cooler 



214.50 

221.50 

61.36 

51.00 

79.00 

149.81 

246.49 

78.00 

599.98 

175.85 



$ 1,715.00 $ 1,877.49 



162.49 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Salary, Chief Boutwell 

Officer Boucher 

Officer Flanders 

Officer Bariteau 

Officer Malburne 

Officer Parmenter 

Officer Dowling 

Specials & School guards 

Answering service 
Supplies 
Telephones 
Fuel, oil 

Parts & repairs, cruisers 
Gas & oil 
Tires 

Blood alchol tests 
Radio repairs 
Dues 

Bike plates 
Clothing allowance 
Chief's expenses 
Officers' physicals 
Ambulance service 
Miscellaneous expenses 
New cruiser 
Postage 
Secretary, Mrs Edwards 



9,200.00 

7,500.00 

6,500.00 

6,800,00 

5,567.28 

2,301.85 

1,453.80 

7,836.15 

520.00 

634.46 

487.04 

87.35 

1,429.26 

2,982.85 

596.54 

70.00 

209.00 

15.00 

228.73 

561.54 

201.25 

210.00 

125.00 

46.34 

3,138.00 

46.52 

174.38 



$ 59,064.30 $ 58,922„34 $ 



141.96 



13 



APPROPRIATION EXPENDITURES BALANCES OVERDRAFTS 



CIVIL DEFENSE 



Office supplies $ 50.86 

Truck maintenance 91.78 

Dues 10.00 

Radio repairs 15.50 

Miscellaneous 22.56 

New equipment, gloves 29.50 

projector 560.95 

radios 152.90 



DOG OFFICER 



$ 1,065.00 $ 934.05 $ 130.95 



Salary, Charles Yerger $ 291.66 

Stuart Nash 379.16 

Expenses 1,416.96 

$ 2,300.00 $ 2,087.78 $ 212.22 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Salary, Chief Mansfield $ 3,000.00 

Call Firemen 3,507.55 

Fees, to Chief 135.00 

Answering service 520.00 

Refills 129.90 

Extinguishers & supplies 830.25 

Truck repairs 358.76 

Gas & oil 160.43 

Repairs to pumps 106,90 

Radio repairs 80.10 

Station expenses 30.30 

Lights 460.66 

Fuel, oil 265.98 

Telephones 545.81 

New equipment, radios 254.00 

Air masks & tanks 409.40 

Monitors 700.00 

Siren 22.00 

Repairs to pick-up 

(reimbursed by Ins.) 179.25 

Repairs to 1951 Ford 494.60 



$ 13,008.50 $ 12,190.89 $ 817.61 

DISPATCH SERVICE $ 9,855.00 $ 9,828.00 $ 27.00 

LEGAL EXPENSES 

Paid to Smith, Welts & 

Currier $ 3,500.00 $ 2,435.91 $ 1,064.09 

14 



APPROPRIATION EXPENDITURES BALANCES OVERDRAFTS 



INSURANCE 



Standard Auto policy $ 1,619.00 

PIP on three bldgs 786.60 

Money & securities 61.00 

Comprehensive Liability 555.40 

Workmen's Compensation 1,580,00 

Officials' Bonds 592.00 

Blue Cross-Blue Shield 1,693.49 



$ 9,350.00 $ 6,887.49 $ 2,462.51 
CARE OF TREES ^^ $ 200.00 $ 200.00 

PLANNING & ZONING 

Board of Adjustment: 

Notices 

Postage & supplies 
Planning Board: 

Secretary 

Postage & freight 

Board exp,, mileage 

Public notices 

Registry of deeds fees 

Printing, Sub-division 
regulations 

File cabinet 



$ 258. 


.82 


115. 


.10 


160. 


.00 


42. 


.77 


30. 


.53 


27. 


.75 


14. 


.50 


97. 


.50 


186. 


.80 



$ 1,110.00 $ 933.77 $ 176.23 

NASHUA REGIONAL PLANNING $ 818.10 $ 811.00 $ 7.10 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT $ 100.00 $ 100.00 

SALEM MENTAL HEALTH $ 2,000.00 $ 2,000.00 

MERR. VALLEY HEALTH $ 2,500.00 $ 2,500.00 

VITAL STATISTICS 

Fees to Town Clerk $ 125.00 $ 132.75 $ 7.75 

TOWN DUMP 

Paid to Roketenetz $ 5,000.00 $ 6,249.96 $ 1,249.96 

SUMMER MAINTENANCE 

Payroll, labor $ 6^317.00 

machinery 11,808.65 

Supplies, signs 15.28 

lumber 381.76 

posts 39.60 

miscellaneous 217,34 

15 



APPROPRIATION EXPENDITURES BALANCES OVERDRAFTS 



Supplies, calcium chloride $ 212,10 

paint 6,95 

culverts 236,55 

Services, blasting 1,111,00 

welding 171,00 

Cold patch 1,948.28 

Sand & gravel 545,42 



WINTER MAINTENANCE 



Payroll, labor $ 7,942,20 

machinery 27,133,35 

Salt 8,647.54 

Sand & gravel 3,784,00 

Plow parts & repairs 1,263,85 

Plastic sprayer 49,90 

Hot top for salt bin 40.00 

Miscellaneous 114.20 



RES EALING 



Payroll, labor $ 1,125.50 

machinery 1,928.00 

Tar & asphalt 13,743.59 

Sand & gravel 3,325.60 



GENERAL EXPENSES OF HIGHWAY 

Surveying, Thomdike $ 1,300.00 

Signs 120.86 



$ 21,000.00 $ 23,010.93 1 $ 2,010.93 



$ 35,000.00 $ 48,975.04 $ 13,975.04 



$ 20,000.00 $ 20,122.69 $ 122.69 



$ 2,500.00 $ 1,420.86 $ 1,079.14 

T R A $ 1,283.32 $ 1,283.32 

STREET LIGHTING $ 6,500.00 $ 5,297.07 $ 1,202.93 

LIBRARIES $ 14,373.00 $ 14,373.00 

OLD AGE ASSISTANCE $ 1,200.00 $ 2,210.32 $ 1,010.32 

TOWN POOR 

Food orders $ 5,365.44 
Rent 416.00 

Fuel, oil 533.21 

16 



APPROPRIATION EXPENDITURES BALANCES OVERDRAFTS 



Insurance 

Electricity 

Medical payments 

Telephones 

Car parts & repairs 

Shoes 



PARKS & PLAYGROUNDS 

MEMORIAL DAY 

SOLDIERS' AID 

STATE AUDIT 

CEMETERIES 

Paid to Trustees 
Gasoline 



DOG DAMAGE 

TOWN HALL SPECIAL 

Cementing cellar, and 
storage room 

WATER COMMITTEE SPECIAL 

Land options 
Water tests 
Administrative expenses 



INTEREST 



POLICE WALKIE-TALKIE 



FIRE/POLICE SITE 
FIRE/POLICE BUILDING 



WILLOW STREET PARK SP, 



FIRE TRUCK SPECIAL 



ROAD SIGNS 



93.71 

359.24 

20.00 

15.97 

151.81 

3.48 



$ 2,500.00 $ 6,958.86 

$ 200.00 $ 200.00 

$ 250.00 $ 250.00 

$ 50.00 

$ 1,200.00 $ 1,308.37 



$ 6,900.00 
88.17 



50.00 



$ 7,000.00 $ 6,988.17 $ 11.83 



250.00 $ 250.00 



$ 1,790.00 $ 1,599.00 $ 191.00 



$ 2,450.00 

3,325.50 

49.40 



$ 25,000.00 $ 5,824.90 $ 19,175.10 

$ 3,200.00 $ 2,321.70 $ 878.30 

$ 5,181.60 $ 1,998.60 $ 3,183.00 

$ 6,000.00 $ 6,000.00 

$ 99,500.00 $ 900.00 $ 98,600.00 



$ 2,600.00 $ 2,600.00 
$ 17,000.00 



15.00 



$ 17,000.00 



15.00 



$ 4,458.86 



$ 108.37 



17 



APPROPRIATION EXPENDITURES BALANCES OVERDRAFTS 
RECREATION 

Salary, John Duclos 

Arthur Hales 

Jane Provencal 

Rebecca George 

Ingrid Windt 

Phyllis Brown 

Ruth Brock 

Doris Levesque 

Betty Borry 

Catherine O'Hearn 

Joan Delaney 

Eva Bedard 
Telephones 
Dues 

Postage & supplies 
Electricity 
Dry line marker 
Theatre production 
Pelham Partners 
Awards 
Shovels 
Mileage 

Paid to Lull & Hartford 
Little League 
Babe Ruth 
Softball 
Summer Program 
Swimming program 
Pony league 
Men' s League 



$ 769, 


.20 


1,500, 


.00 


80, 


.00 


80, 


.00 


180, 


.00 


45, 


.00 


385, 


.00 


135, 


.00 


375, 


.00 


200, 


.00 


200, 


.00 


41, 


.60 


39, 


.57 


65, 


.00 


65, 


.34 


64. 


.38 


55, 


.00 


71. 


.00 


30, 


,00 


33. 


.55 


6. 


.00 


100. 


,00 


1,436. 


,61 


600. 


,00 


252. 


,00 


588. 


.07 


92. 


.65 


38. 


.25 


175, 


.75 


139, 


.65 



$ 8,688.20 $ 7,843.62 $ 844.58 



NEW CONSTRUCTION 



Payroll, labor $ 669.00 

machinery 4,302.45 

Culverts 800.00 

Asphalt 475,33 

Miscellaneous supplies 174.64 

Sand & gravel 2,495.68 



$ 6,000.00 $ 8,917.10 $ 2,917.10 

FIRE TRUCK CAPITAL RES. $ 3,000.00 $ 3,000.00 



TOTALS $442,421.32 $318,798.96 $153,847.85 $ 30,225.49 



$123,622.36 
18 



TOTAL EXPENDED ON NON-APPROPRIATED ITEMS 

Race Traffic $ 1,413.80 

Discounts, abatements, etc. 5,336.78 

Emergency Employment Act 1,076.90 

Bond & Debt Retirement Tax 45.63 

1970 Fire Truck Capital Res. 1,111.98 

1970 Fire Siren 2,684.92 

Mercury Lane 2,321.01 

1970 Pulpit Rock Road 3,025.00 

Resident Tax Payment 3,357.00 

Temporary Loans 249,274.30 

County Tax _ 49,490.25 

Schools 909,872.14 

Taxes Bought by the Town 15,646.20 

Head Tax Payment 7,607.00 



$1,252,262.91 
TOTAL EXPENDITURES $1,571,061.87 



19 



MINUTES OF 1971 TOWN MEETING 
March 11, 1971 



Moderator James Fen ton called the meeting to order at 7:50 PM. The 
final figure voted for the total town budget, as later amended by the State 
Tax Commission, was $ 442,421.32. 

The following report notes changes made by the Town Meeting of items in 
the 1971 budget, as presented by the Budget Committee. In addition, Town 
Meeting action on the special articles which appeared in the 1971 warrant 
is included. 

An additional $ 1,000.00 was added to the Town Officers' Salaries 
category on an amendment by Mrs, Rossi. This sum would provide an additional 
$ 1,000.00 for the tax collector's salary. 

The budget figure for Election and Registration Expenses was reduced 
by the Town Meeting by $ 100.00 because there was doubt that re-registration 
of voters would now not be required until 1974. 

Article 28, which provided $ 9,855.00 for the purpose of operating a 
police dispatch service under a matching funds program, was passed in the 
affirmative. 

Article 5, which requested $ 1,000.00 for support by the Town of the 
Greater Salem Mental Health Association, was amended to $ 2,000.00, which 
amended figure was accepted and passed by the Town Meeting. 

Support by the Town of the Merrimack Valley Home Health Service for the 
sum of $ 2,500.00, encompassed in Article 6, was passed in the affirmative. 

Article 11, $ 1,283,32 for Town Road Aid, was accepted. 

The sum voted for libraries was increased from $ 11,938.00 to $ 14,373.00 
on a hand-vote, 89-75. The additional funds would allow the Library Trustees 
to proceed with renovation of the library building plus architect's fees. 

Article 8, which provided for purchase of the Willow Street Park 
Special, was amended to delete the phrase "said property to be used as a 
town park and recreation facility". The amended version of the article, 
for $ 2,600.00, was passed in the affirmative. 

Article 27, to raise and appropriate $ 2,364.00 for radio equipment, 
was amended to read $ 5,181.60. The amended figure was moved and seconded 
and passed in the affirmative. 

Article 24, which provided $ 3,200.00 for purchase of a new snow plow, 
was defeated. 

The appropriation for new construction, $ 6,000.00, was recommended by 
the Budget Committee to be used on Currier Road. This was accepted and passed 
in the affirmative, 

20 



Article 20, which asked for the sum of $ 6,000.00 to purchase two acres 
for the site of the fire/police station building, was tabled until com- 
pletion of deliberation on Article 17, the article which, if passed, would 
authorize the Selectmen to construct the combination fire/police station 
building. 

When Article 17 was taken up, it was moved and seconded to lay this 
article on the table. Before action was taken on this motion, the Moderator, 
after questioning the assembley concerning a motion for adjournment, accepted 
a motion and second for adjournment to Friday, March 12, 1971 at 7:30 PM. 
The adjournment motion was passed, and meeting was adjourned at 11:00 PM, 



Adjournment of 1971 Town Meeting 
March 12, 1971 

Due to the absence of Town Clerk Faye Emerson, the Moderator adminis- 
tered the oath of office to Mrs. Sandra Corbin who acted as Town Clerk for 
the evening. 

After a presentation by Mr. Garfield on the proposed fire/police station 
building, it was stated that a building committee will be appointed if Article 
17 passes, to select final design and layout. Article 17 was passed in the 
affirmative. 

Article 20, the purchase of two acres on which to build the station 
for $ 6,000.00, was passed in the affirmative. The official minutes pro- 
vide for purchase of land on the corner of Dutton and Atwood Roads. 

Article 18, authorizing the Selectmen to use the $ 40,000.00 in the station 
capital reserve fund, was passed. 

Article 19, to raise $ 59,500.00 by the issuance of five-year interest- 
bearing notes, was passed by a two- thirds vote, 194-27. 

A motion by Richard Craven "that the Selectmen hold a public meeting 
prior to the final selection of a Fire/Police Building", was carried in 
the affirmative. 

Article 25, authorizing the Selectmen to expend $ 25,000.00 for a town 
water study, was passed in the affirmative. 

Ar6icle 7, calling for $ 10,000.00 for construction of a sidewalk along 
Marsh Road between the Memorial School and Willow Street, was passed over. 

Article 12, which provided for the purchase of a fire truck in 1972, 
was passed in the affirmative for $ 17,000.00, 

The Town Meeting agreed, in Article 16, to appropriate $ 818,10 for 



21 



support of the Nashua Regional Planning Commission. 

Article 23, providing for repairing or renovating the basement of the 
Town Hall for the sum of $ 1,790.00, was approved. 

Police Chief Ralph Boutwell moved that Article 26, calling for construc- 
tion of a detention facility in the present police station, be passed over. 
This motion passed in the affirmative. 

Article 21, calling for $ 20,000.00 to be added to the fire/police station 
capital reserve fund, was passed over. 

Article 13, which provided for the addition of $ 3,000.00 to the fire 
truck capital reserve fund, was passed in the affirmative. 

A motion by James Powers, on behalf of the Blldget Committee, "To have 
all Town-owned vehicles clearly marked "Town of Pelham" was amended to 
exclude police cruisers. The amended motion was passed. 

Article 9, authorizing the Selectmen to appoint a Highway Agent on the 
expiration of the term of the Highway Agent elected at the Annual Meeting of 
the Town in 1971, was passed over. 

Article 10, authorizing the Town Treasurer to appoint a Deputy Treasurer, 
was passed in the affirmative. 

In Article 14, the Town voted to change the article to read 1971 
fire department appropraition, and agreed to place the 1971 department appro- 
priation in the fire truck capital reserve fund. 

The Town Meeting voted to pass over Article 22, calling for the sale of 
D. Gage Lot # 2 for $ 500.00. 

Article 29, authorizing the Selectmen, Town Clerk and Town Treasurer to 
dispose of old municipal records, was amended to include "and that these 
records be referred to the Pelham Historical Society". The amended motion 
passed in the affirmative. 

Article 30, calling for the discontinuance of a portion of Jericho 
Road near telephone poles 14 and 15, was passed in the affirmative. 

A motion to reconsider Article 24, calling for purchase of a snow 
plow, was defeated. 

The meeting adjourned at 10i45 PM. 



22 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
July 29, 1971 

The meeting was called to order at 8:00 PM. Moderator James Fen ton 
began the meeting by explaining the all discussion would be limited to the 
specific article in the warrant. 

On a motion by Norman Lawrence, the meeting voted that a ballot vote 
be cast on Article 1. 

A statement from the Fire/Police Station Building Committee, setting 
forth their reasons for considering the Common location as the number one 
choice for the fire/poliic building, was read by Officer Wayne Bariteau. 

Mr, Frederick Garland moved that the article be postponed indefinitely. 
However, the Moderator would accept no motions until after the discussion 
period on the article. 

Mr, Churchill Rood, on behalf of the Conservation Committee, feels that 
the common should be preserved as a park. Mrs, Harriet Mansfield discussed 
the fact that the people were getting the two areas in the center of town 
confused, and that the Town Common is the area with a fence around it. The 
site in question just being the old site of the old town hall, Mr, Robert 
Robb asked why this site was chosen as the # 1 location, Mr, Wayne Bariteau 
asnwered that it was the most central location available for fire engine 
dispatch, ambulance service, etc, Mr, Fred Bischoff questioned the nearness 
to the school year and was answered that this nearness was an advantage, 
Charlotte Vautier asked if this property was town-owned -- yes. Fire 
Chief Richard Mansfield spoke in favor of the site because of its central lo- 
cation. David Curran felt in agreement with the Conservation Committee's view, 
but also feels that common sense should be used -- what better monument than 
a new fire/police station. Mr, Tillotson asked why we had to have a Town 
Meeting if the town already owns the land. The reply being that the Selectmen 
wished to get the opinion of the twwnspeople before considering it, Mr, Norman 
Lawrence stated that he was definitely opposed to this location when it was 
brought up in 1966, However, believes it would be a definite asset now. 

After Mr, Mansfield called for the question, Mr, Reynolds questioned the 
status of research being done on the possibility of closing the section of 
Marsh Road in question. Mr, Strawbridge responded by reading a letter from 
Mr. Whittaker, of the State Highway Department, which he had received in 
reply to his inquiry, Mr. Whittaker agreed that it was a very hazardous 
intersection and that he had received many complaints about it. However, 
he felt that closing the road would not solve the problem, but he would be 
willing to cooperate in finding a solution if this site were approved 
for the Fire/Police building. 

Final vote: 132 voting 40-No 91-Yes 1-Blank 

Meeting adjourned at 8:50 PM, 



23 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
September 27, 1971 



Moderator James Fenton called the meeting to order at 8:00 PM, and 
because of an overflow crowd, moved the meeting from the E.G. Sherburne 
School to the Memorial School. 

After the warrant was read by the Moderator, Article 1 was taken up. 

Mr. Churchill Rood made a motion to consider the Article by secret 
ballot. Seconded. The Moderator ruled, at this time, that the article was 
out of order and would not accept a motion on it. Numerous appeals and 
seconds were heard throughout the hall on the Chair's decision. Before any 
action was taken on the appeals, Mr. Fenton wished to explain his decision 
for ruling the article out of order. Mr. Fenton stated that he had spent 
considerable time with the authorities of the State on this article and based 
his decision on parliamentary procedure as defined on page 82 of Robert's 
Rules of Order, namely, that, "This motion is peculiar in that the making 
of the motion has a higher rank than its consideration, and for a certain time 
prevents anything being done as the reait of the vote it is proposed to 
reconsider. It can be made only on the day the vote to be reconsidered 
was taken, or on the next succeeding day, a legal holiday or a recess not 
being counted as a day. It must be made by one who voted with the prevailing 
side. Any member may second it. It can be made while any other question is 
pending, even if another member has the floor, or after it has been voted to 
adjourn, provided the chair has not declared the assembly adjourned. It 
may be made after the previous question has been ordered, in which case it and 
the motion to be reconsidered are undebatable." Mr, Fenton went further to 
state that on August 17 of this year, he had written to the Selectmen 
giving them his opinion that the move to reconsider the first article of the 
July 29, 1971 Special Town Meeting was out of order at that time. Any move 
to reconsider the article should have been taken at the time of the meeting. 

Mr, Charles Hamblett rose and requested that discussion be held on the 
article. This was denied in view of the moderator's decision on the article. 
A second appeal was made and was disallowed. 

According to the "rules of appeal", the Moderator conducted a vote to 
determine the question, "Shall the decision of the Chair be sustained". 
The meeting was recessed while the assembly proceeded with voting by ballot 
on this question. 

After the voting was completed and while the votes were being counted. 
Article 2 of the warrant was acted on. It was moved and seconded that the 
article be accepted. Mr. James Powers asked if this article gave the 
Selectmen authority to seek out and apply for available funds without having 
to have a Town Meeting. The asnwer was yes. The article passed in the 
affirmative. 

412 Votes Cast 222 Yes 190 No 

After appeals on the decision to have no discussion were denied. The 
meeting was adjourned at 9:45 PM, 



24 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
December 1, 1971 

Moderator James Fenton opened the meeting at 10:00 AM, and after 
reading the warrant and inspecting and locking the ballot box, opened the 
polls. The Moderator closed the polls at 8:00 PM. 

The following results were announced: 

Question: Do you approve of Dog Racing in the Town of Pelham? 

Yes 369 No 177 

According to law the ballots were sealed and signed for by the Moderator 
and Selectmen and turned over to the Town Clerk at 8:30 PM. 



25 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



A very busy and active year reaches its conclusion and the following 
is a report on "The Year That Was" from your Board of Selectmen, 1971. 

It was an unfortunate year in that one of your elected selectmen 
passed away. After an illness of approximately six months Selectman 
Haven Strout died of natural causes. Mr. Strout loved the Town of 
Pelham and was dedicated to his cause. 

This was also a year of many changes in town government. Through 
the auspices of the United States Government and their Emergency Em- 
ployment Act program we were successful in securing three positions for 
our town, a grant of over twenty-five throusand dollars ($25,000.00). 
For the services of an additional patrolman for our police force, an 
administrative assistant for the selectmen, and a town engineer, we are 
responsible for a ten percent (in kind) contribution. In plain English, 
we received those services for approximately $2,500.00. 

Through the efforts of your planning board the sub-division reg- 
ulations have been substantially changed. Pelham should be able to look 
forward to a sensible growth pattern with some assurance that many of the 
problems of the past will not occur again. 

Now that we have proper plans and specifications we can all look 
forward to the dedication of our new police fire station during this 
year. Though the location of this building has been a controversial issue, 
it will be located on the old Town Common, in the center of town. 

New bookkeeping and accounting procedures have been introduced 
during the past year; many are now being used. 

In conclusion, the year of 1971 proved to be a year of total 
dedication to the implementation and enforcement of state and town laws 
and ordinances. 



Board of Selectmen 

Melvin R, Strawbridge 
John C. Laval lee 
James P. Emerson 



26 



BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 



The purpose of the Board of Adjustment is to rectify slight 
inadequacies in its zoning ordinances through a variance. During 1971, 
forty-five cases were posted for adjustments to the zoning ordinances. 
Four hundred fifty dollars was turned over to the Treasurer as fees paid 
for these appeals. James Emerson acted as Chairman for the first nine 
months of 1971, until he was appointed Selectman, due to the untimely 
death of Mr, Haven S trout. Other members of the board were Charles 
Bernard, Vice Chairman, Walter Kosik, Clerk. Also contributing their 
time were Mr. Willis Atwood and Mr. Fabian Chiasson. 



Charles Bernard, Chairman 



DOG OFFICER 



Board of Selectmen 
Pelham, New Hampshire 

Dear Sirs: 

On June 15, 1971, I was appointed Dog Officer for Pelham after the 
resignation of Charles Yerger. The calls handled by Officer Yerger and 
myself are as follows: 



Total Calls 


698 


Reported Dog Bites 


47 


Stray, Kept the Required 




Time and Placed or 




Destroyed 


114 


Dogs hit by Cars 


22 


Dog Licenses Issued 




to date 


468 



The above listed calls are only some of the calls received; there are 
too many to list. If anyone has lost their dog and it is gone for more 
than 24 hours, please call the dog officer at 635-2546 as this may prevent 
the unnecessary destruction of many dogs. In most cases, the only charge 
is the boarding fee. If anyone has any problems with dogs they should 
also call me at 635-2546, as this is the only way I can find out if there 
is a dog problem. If anyone is looking for a dog they should also call 
me as I usually have some good dogs to place in homes. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Stuart W. Nash 
Dog Officer 



27 



BUILDING INSPECTOR'S REPORT 



Number 

88 

9 
II 
68 
15 

6 
15 

4 

3 

3 



Description 

Single Dwellings 

Two- family Dwellings 

Install & Repair Leach Fields 

Additions & Alterations 

Swimming Pools 

Storage & Tool Sheds 

Breezeways & Garages 

Horse Barns 

Porches 

Fireplaces 

Multiple Dwelling 

Cider Mill 

Egg Packing & Storage Bldg, 

Carport 

Power Station 

Craft Shop 

Tire Shop 

Doctor's Office 

Relocating Building 

Fence 

Sundeck 

Service Station 



Estimated Cost 

$1,585,590.00 

218,649.00 

6,425.00 

184,258.95 

38,500.00 

5,450.00 

27,125.00 

900.00 

1,350.00 

2,400.00 

100,000.00 

500.00 

40,000.00 

2,000.00 

22,500.00 

2,000.00 

2,200.00 

18,720.00 

1,000.00 

350.00 

500.00 

5,600.00 



234 



$2,266,008.95 



FINANCIAL REPORT 



Fees for 234 Permits 

Paid to R. G. Edwards, Sr. 

15 Permit Renewals (? $1.00 



$2,935.50 

2,701.50 

15.00 



Total to Town 



$249.00 



Respectfully submitted, 
Robert G. Edwards 



28 



CIVIL DEFENSE DIRECTORS REPORT 

To the People of Pelham: 

It is my pleasure to report the following activities of 1971: 

Our warning annex was enhanced this year by the installation of a new 
three- tone siren annex. Chief Richard Mansfield was responsible for the 
installation. 

For the benefit of those who may not know the meaning of the three 
tones, they are as follows: 

(1) Rapid alternating high- low note is for fire and is sounded each 
day at noon. 

(2) A sustained double tone for 3-5 minutes. 

(3) An undulated double tone or wobble for 3-5 minutes is an attack 
warning, meaning everyone should take cover. 

(4) All test soundings are conducted for a 1 minute duration and 
advance notice will be made public. 

As a note of interest for 1971, the civil defense budget was $1,065; 
the town received $1,129.56 in matching funds, thus making this project 
profitable for the community. 

During this past year an eight week community emergency planning and 
operations course was conducted by an instructor from the University of 
New Hampshire, for heads of departments in Pelham. The purpose of this 
course was to write a basic emergency operating plan for the Town of Pelham, 
We have now begun the task of writing respective annexes to this plan. The 
following completed the course and received certificates: 

James V. Berry Richard E. Mansfield 

Alton M. Hodgman Maurice E. Nantel 

Mitchel E. Kopacz Stuart W. Nash 

Edmund L. Lapointe Thomas J. Stack 

The following received attendance certificates only: 

Willis H. Atwood George M. Neskey 

Ralph S. Boutwell John E. Newcomb 

Faye B, Emerson Millis C, Pelton 

Russell Harris Melvin R. Strawbridge 
Donald Hornbeck 

Twenty pupils from Alvirne High School completed the Personal and Family 
Survival Course conducted Mrs, Heath and assisted by Mrs, Buder, 



29 



This year we purchased a 16nim sound projector and screen for the purpose 
of showing training films. This projector is available to all town departments 
upon request. We have also purchased a mobile charger and amplifier for 
use with the portable radio in the civil defense truck. 

For 1972 my budget earmarks additional money requests for radio equip- 
ment. With a growing population and additional problems, we are experiencing 
a lack of communications equipment. Several times this past year we have 
been without communications due to lack of equipment. 

In conclusion, we wish to thank each and all who have been instrumental 
in carrying out a successful civil defense program. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Maurice E, Nantel, Director 
John E, Newcomb, Deputy Director 



HEALTH OFFICER 



Board of Selectmen 
Pelham, New Hampshire 

Gentlemen: 

I herewith submit my report of communicable diseases reported to the 
Health Officer during 1971, 



Chicken Pox 109 

Mumps « 43 

Pediculosis 22 

Impetigo 17 

Strep Throat 21 

Scarlee Fever 1 

Flu 330 

Measles 1 

Scarletina 1 

Gas tro- Intestinal Virus , 100 

Respiratory Infection 123 

Pneumonia 1 

Chronic Hepatitis 1 

Conjunctivitis 1 

Dog Bites 47 

Monkey Bites 1 

Rat Bites 1 

Guinea Pig Bites 1 



30 



Boarding home licenses were issued to residents for a total of 14 children. 

One Group Day Care license was issued for forty children, 4 to 6 years 
of age. 

One report was received for the premature birth of a child. 

During the year there were several complaints investigated by the 
Health Officer with the co-operation of the State Department of Health, 
the Department of Public Works and Highways, and the State Water Pol- 
lution Board, 

Excessive chloride was found in one well and the matter was turned over 
to the Selectmen, Several complaints were received from one of the 
new developments in the town and orders were issued to several home 
owners to correct open drainage from septic systems. 

Several calls were received by the Health Officer concerning the testing 
of well water. Persons desiring a water analysis report should write 
to or contact the State of New Hampshire, Water Supply and Pollution 

Control Commission, 61 South Spring Street, Concord, N,H, 03301, 

Several complaints were received about pollution from a dump on the 
Pelham-Methuen line and investigation by the State Department of Health 
resulted in a cease-and-desist order being issued to the land owner 
for violating the land fill laws and the water gravity laws, 

I wish to express my thanks to the School Nurses, June Groele and 
Beverly Hamel for their reports on communicable diseases in the schools, 
to Stewart Nash, Dog Officer, for reports of dog bites, and to Chief 
Boutwell for reports of animal bites by other than dogs, 

I also wish to thank those citizens with whom I have been involved in the 
many investigations during the year for their co-operation which resulted 
in all cases being corrected without the necessity of court action. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Alton M, Hodgman, Health Officer 



31 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

We herewith present the annual report of our activities for the 
year I97I. 

The Conservation Commission meets every first and third Monday 
of each month at 7 PM at the Town Hall, 

In July the commission sent out a questionnaire to the town asking 
for suggestions for the community. More than fifty people wrote in 
reply. The most frequently mentioned need was for better planning and 
control in town so as to preserve open space, create wildlife sanc- 
tuaries and parks. 

The commission felt that it needed more information about topog- 
raphy and soil conditions in the town than is now available. The State 
and Ford Foundation were contacted for help and funds. An article in 
the Town Warrant asks for funds to be used to be supplemented by the 
Ford Foundation, to give the town a soil survey map. This map is the 
first and absolutely necessary step for decisions and plans for future 
open space in the town. 

The commissioners at various times met with the State and Regional 
Planning Office to discuss solid waste disposal for the town in future 
years. 

The commission wrote a first draft of possible Conservation Zoning 
for Pelham and got expert opinion from the Conservation Law Foundation 
as to procedure and policies to be adopted by a town wishing to preserve 
open space. 

Books and magazines about conservation were purchased by the library 
as a result of suggestions from the Conservation Commission. 

The commission adopted a policy of taking a position on issues 
involving water, wet lands, land fill and preservation of trees, wild 
areas and open space within the town. The commission has no power to 
enforce its views; it feels, however, that the conservation welfare of 
the town should be brought to attention from time to time. The com- 
missioners appeared three times in cases before the Board of Adjustment. 

The Conservation Commission wishes to state publicly that it believes 
that the single most valuable piece of open space in the town of Pelham 
lies at the town center in the Town Common land. The commission continues 
to offer help in obtaining an alternate site for the Fire/Police 
station proposed to be built on that open space. 

Respectively submitted: 

Churchill Rood, Chairman Sara Reynolds, Secretary Dow Case 
John Lavallee, Selectman Harry McPherson Fred Bischoff 



32 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



REPORT OF THE FOREST FIRE WARDEN AND DISTRICT CHIEF 
LEST WE FORGET - IT CAN HAPPEN HERE 



Disastrous forest and brush fires that destroy hundreds of homes are 
more prevalant on the west coast with their dry seasons and strong dry 
hot winds but 25 years ago this fall is the anniversary of a disaster that 
devastated large areas of northern New England leaving villages in ashes 
with rows of cellarholes and chimneys in a number of summer vacation 
home locations. Many lives were lost on that destructive day of October 
23, 1947 nothing could stop the wind driven flames. 

It is true that such conditions are unusual for New Hampshire but they 
happened once, they can happen again. The fuel for fires is all around us. 
All it takes is a firebrand. Only by cultivating a habit of carefulness 
with fire at all times can we meet the challenge of protection when dry 
conditions prevail. Please let these reminders be your guide: 

1. Never, either when walking, riding or driving, discard a firebrand- 
a lighted match or a glowing cigarette. 

2. Always obtain a permit for any outside burning. The burning of 
household rubbish is not permitted if your town has rubbish 
collection. Burning of grass or garden litter can be dangerous. 
See your warden first. 

3. If you camp or picnic, be sure open fires are allowed and if i the 
are, put them dead out when leaving. 

^. Most important - instruct your children in the danger of the lighted 
match, A lighted match and dry grass or forest litter is a 
dangerous combination which leads to destructive loss and can 
lead to tragedy. 

The past year, 1971, was a favorable year for the control of fires. 
There were too many fire starts in some towns. We thank those who 
remembered and ask others to heed Smokey's message. 

Number of fires reported and acres burned - 1971 season: 

STATE - 463 160 acres 



DISTRICT 



TOWN 



101 
13 



61 



Ralph Stevens 
District Chief 



Richard Mansfield 
Forest Fire Warden 
Pelham 



33 



FIRE CALLS: 



OTHER SERVICE CALLS: 



Brush, grass & pine needles 

Buildings 

Debris 

Lumber in building 

Motor vehicles 

Oil Burners 

Oven 

Stove 

Tractor & hay 



17 
3 
2 
1 

11 
1 
1 
1 

J. 

38 



Auto accidents 
Blast damage 
Explosion 
False alarms 
Fire bombing 
Lightning strikes 
Motor vehicles 
Pumping water 
Smoke scares 
Standby duty 
Wetting down debris 
Wiring 



7 
1 
1 
3 
1 
6 
2 
1 
6 
2 
1 
1 



32 



FIRE DEPARTMENT PAYROLL: 

Aaniel Atwood 
Frank Stwood 
Herbert Atwood 
Jonathan Atwood 
Willis Atwood 
Arnold Balcom 
Graham Balcom 
Lucien Bilodeau 
Roland Boucher 
Nathan Boutwell 
Ralph Boutwell 
Miles Cares 
Frank Carle ton 
Russell Corbin 
Albert R Cote 
Richard Derby 
Eleodore Desautels 
Robert M Edwards 
Robert S Edwards 
Robert Fletcher 
George Garland 
Ronald Gonsalves 
James Greenwood 
Robert Greenwood 
Robert Hirsch 
Charles Hobbs 
Charles Hobbs III 
Robert Hobbs 
Alton Hodgman 
James Holt, Jr 
Robert Holt 
Isaia Isaia 



149.50 


Edmund Lapoint $ 


288.02 


53.25 


Nonuan Lawrence 


16e00 


56.77 


Noniian Lawrence, Jr 


56,50 


6.00 


Leonard 


39.50 


75.75 


Raymond Malbume 


8.00 


48.00 


Frederick Mansfield 


258.27 


91.75 


Richard Mansfield 


249.16 


4.00 


Bruce Mason 


2,00 


5.00 


Hubert Mason 


2.00 


3.00 


Frank Melanson 


29.75 


10.00 


Richard Melanson 


111.63 


7.50 


William Melanson 


164.00 


5.25 


Harold Mooney 


4.00 


46.50 


Donald Morse 


6.00 


3.00 


Hugh Porter 


77.13 


151.76 


David Provencal 


6.00 


5.00 


Lor in Raymond 


81.00 


21.63 


Lor in Raymond, Jr 


4.00 


5.00 


Herbert Richardson Jr 


13.00 


87.63 


Fred Robinson 


2.00 


57.75 


Fred Rourke 


2.00 


2.00 


Patrick Rou5ke 


2.00 


64.38 


Roy Silloway 


127.66 


2.00 


David Slater 


105.63 


86.50 


Lawrence Skinner 


6.00 


157.00 


Paul Steck 


4.00 


124.50 


Stephen Straughan 


107.50 


13.00 


Charles Therriault 


65.50 


158.14 


Stephen Tower 


6.00 


174.51 


David Viera 


2.00 


2.00 


Charles Yerger 


8.00 


6.00 







$3507.55 



34 



HIGHWAY AGENT 



The funds appropriated for summer maintenance were spent in patching 
roads, adding and replacing old culverts, hauling gravel, cutting brush 
and dead trees, grading gravel roads, repairing dangerous areas and clean- 
ing up storm damage and washouts. This year the corners on Jericho Road 
and Button Road were blasted and removed to eliminate these dangerous 
areas. Castle Hill Bridge was replanked and new guard rails added. 

Winter maintenance is the plowing, sanding and salt^ing of all roads, 
town accepted, new developments and private roadways. Since the town 
does not own any equipment, it must rely on local contractors for 
trucks. All plowing is done by hired trucks, some are equipped with their 
own plows, five plows are supplied by the town. For a set hourly rate, 
the contractor supplies the truck with driver, gas, and is responsible 
for his own repairs. Helpers, who are paid by the town, are hired to 
ride the trucks. Their job is to watch for obstacles and control the 
wing, also to help in case the truck becomes disabled. 

Resealing for this town is done by Bell and Flynn who specialize 
in this operation. Roads are chosen on a three-year basis. 

Equipment must also be hired for work on new construction. This 
means trucks, grader, loader, roller and backhoe. Due to the town's 
earth removal ordinance, gravel and fill is now brought in from out of 
town at an increased rate from what was bought locally; this increased 
expenditure for new construction and for all other town maintenance 
raised expenses. This year the end of Currier Road was completed. 
Under TRA (Town Road Aid) a section of Wharf Road was reconstructed. 



George Neskey, Highway Agent 



HIGHWAY PAYROLL 



Machinery: 

B & B Trucking 

Raymond Bernier 

Nathan Boutwell 

Charles Chamberlin 

Frank Forrest 

Donald Foss 

Hillsboro Sand & Gr,,Inc 

Hirsch Bros.,Inc 

Herbert Madden 

John Maiocchi 

George Neskey 

Stanley Neskey 

Wilmer Paquette 

Pelham Services 



$ 117.00 

65.00 

4,040.00 

11.00 

2,652.00 

402.50 

3,245.00 

1,492.00 

551.00 

120.00 

27,929.50 

385.50 

14.00 

322,00 



Charles Potter 
Edward Potter 
S.N.O.W. 
John Tokenal 



Proof of Balance; 

Summer 

Winter 

Resealing 

New Construction 

Mercury Lane 



$ 4,343.95 

10.00 

20.00 

136.00 

$45,856.45 



$27,133.35 

11,808.65 

1,928.00 

4,302.45 

684.00 

$45,856,45 



35 



Labor: 



Daniel Mendes 
Daniel Mendes Jr 



$ 



35.00 
105.00 



John Barrett 


$ 10.00 


George Neskey 


3 


,995.20 


Peter Bergeron 


2,197.50 


James Nes key- 


2 


,802.50 


Charles Bernard 


95.00 


Robert Neskey 




125.00 


Kenneth Boutwell 


570.00 


Stanley Neskey 




257.50 


Thomas Brunelle 


295.00 


Stanley Neskey Jr 




598.00 


Michael Collins 


117.50 


Norman Perigny 




67.50 


Steven DePaula 


52.50 


Charles Potter 




55.00 


Robert M Edwards 


17.50 


Edward Potter 




475.00 


Robert S Edwards 


332.50 


Richard Potter 




70.00 


William Edwards 


62.50 


Raymond Roussell 




35.00 


Paul Fisher Jr 


16.50 


Leo M Rush 




140.00 


Paul Fisher III 


97.50 


Herman Stiles 




372.50 


Peter Fisher 


92.50 


Ronald Therriault 




55.00 


Donald Foisie 


130.00 


Larry Thibeault 




10.00 


Arnold Forrest 


20.00 


Walter Wood 




685.00 


Richard Forrest 


47.50 








Donald Foss 


1,418.00 




$16 


,445.20 


Maurice Fortier 


25.00 








Benjamin Garland 


65.00 


Proof of Balance: 






Joseph Gauthier 


62.50 








Robert Hobbs 


165.00 


Suiimier 


$ 6 


,317.00 


Nicholas Isaia 


27.50 


Winter 


7. 


,942.20 


Donald Lehmann 


145.00 


Res ea ling 


1 


,125.50 


Patrick Lund 


217.50 


New Construction 




669.00 


Todd Madden 


90.00 


Mercury Lane 




391.50 


Bruce Mason 


32.50 








John Mansur 


30.00 




$16 


,445.20 


Archie McCallum 


130.00 









36 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES 



During the past year our chief endeavor has been to increase commun- 
ity involvement and participation in the library through various exhibits 
and programs. 

In March, the newly formed book committee comprised of volunteers, 
began meeting on a monthly basis. We wish to thank them for their co-op- 
eration and excellent book selections which we hope you have found en- 
joyable. We wish to take this opportunity to extend an invitation to any 
Pelham resident interested in serving on this committee, 

Mrs. Rachel Sanborn, District Consultant, held several sessions at 
the library teaching our assistants book cataloguing. In July, an as- 
sistant attended U.N.H, on scholarship for two weeks of courses teaching 
library techniques. 

On May 2nd, an open house was held in the memorial room for Mrs. 
Mary Sherburne, local artist whose works were displayed during the month 
of May. It was attended by eighty people and refreshments were served. 
Beginning July 6th, we displayed the Traveling Art Exhibit on loan from 
the Nashua Public Library. This collection was especially enjoyed by 
the children participating in our summer reading program, and included 
reproductions of American paintings. An exhibit of paintings and draw- 
ings by Marcia Everhard of Mammoth Road was displayed during the month 
of September. In October, Terry Gagnon of Marsh Road displayed her ex- 
hibit of impressionist, modem and realist oil paintings. The trustees 
will be happy to make arrangements for any persons wishing to display 
their art, craft, or hobby. 

In the spring, the outside trim was caulked and painted. A new 
mailbox was installed for greater convenience to the staff. The over- 
burdened shelves in the children's section were replaced with brightly 
coloured book cases and a new reading table was added to enhance this 
area for our pre-schoolers and older children, A record displayer has 
been purchased for storage and display of our record collection along 
with a revolving book rack for easier access and display of paperbacks. 
Carter and Woodruff of Nashua, New Hampshire, have drawn up architectural 
plans for the renovation of the building. Three phases of construction 
provide for uninterruption of library service. This plan would double 
the amount of available area thus enabling us to surmount our rapidly 
growing problem of overcrowding. The plans and blueprints are available 
at the library for public perusal. 

We would like to extend our sincerest appreciation to Grace O'Heam 
for her long hours of service to the library this past year. 

A summer reading program set up by Joanne Hamblett was conducted 
between July 19th and the 29th. Over 106 volunteer hours benefited more 
than 100 children. The program featured a story hour after which Grace 
O'Hearn conducted a tour of the library and explained the use of the card 
catalogue system. The children checked out selections from over seventy 



37 



new titles purchased especially for this program. Several volunteers 
attended a story- telling workshop given by Mrs. Barker, children's 
librarian from Nashua. This program would not have been possible without 
the splendid co-operation of Mr, Martin, principal, and Mrs. Shelley, 
remedial reading teacher, who helped us immensely in selecting titles 
for the program. But the heart of this program was the volunteer work of j 
Joanne Hamblett, Mrs. Barker, Rosie Ebacher, Giselle Sampson, Sue Rood, 
Ann Bischoff, Lois Ives, Ruth Brock, Sherry Freund, Caren Estey, Cynthia 
Sullivan, Kathy Perron, Sandra Stork, and Lucille Craven. All of us 
thank you for making the library come alive for children. 

In October, Ann Atkins and Toni Chapman joined our library staff. 

Saturday, October 30th, Jane Clark of Nashua led a story hour, de- 
lighting twenty-four children, A second story hour again featuring Jane 
Clark was held on November 13th, when twenty-nine children participated. 
Two films entitled "Madeline" and "The Animal's Christmas" were shown to 
thirty-five children accompanied by eighteen adults on Saturday, December 
4th, Coffee was served to the parents during this event, Ann Atkins, 
Jane Clark and Susan Rood deserve special thanks for making these pro- 
grams a success. 

Since we initiated our new book charging system on February 22nd of 
this year, we have issued 1,352 borrower's cards. We are very pleased to 
announce that our book circulation has increased 557o over last year. 

Our deepest appreciation goes out to all those people who have con- 
tributed their time, efforts, donations, and ideas to help make the li- 
brary serve you better. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Sandra M, Corbin, Chairman 
Anne S. Hince, Treasurer 
Lucille T, Craven, Secretary 



38 



1971 REPORT OF INCOME RECEIVED AND FINAL EXPENDITURES 

PELHAM PUBLIC LIBRARY 



INCOME FROM ALL SOURCES 



Carryover from 1970 $ 4,200.15 

Town Appropriation, 1971 14,373.00 

Mary T. Gage Trust 12.55 

Charles Seavey Trust 63.39 

Book Fines 192.25 

Book Sale 750.00 

Pa3mient for Lost Books 30.33 

General Trust Interest 4.80 

Miscellaneous Income 4.80 

Donations 25.00 

Elimination of Petty Cash Fund 5.00 

Total Income from all Sources $ 20,193.19 



EXPENDITURES JAN. 1- DEC. 31, 1971 



Salaries $ 6,386.90 

Library Supplies 660.15 

Building Maintenance 1,316.73 

Utilities 836.89 

Capital Expenditure 4,093.18 

Special Programs 60.10 

Signs 2.50 

Holiday Pay 159.75 

Vacation Pay 108.50 

Trustees' Expenses 212.90 

Education Expenses 143.00 

Transportation 9,20 

Postage 118,19 

Equipment Repairs 10.00 

Books 2,976.95 

Periodicals 301.72 

Rentals 135.00 

Total Expenditures $ 17,531.66 

Balance on Hand Jan. 1, 1972 $ 2,661.53 



39 



PELHAM MUNICIPAL COURT 



The following cases were handled by the Pelham Municipal Court during the 
year ending December 31, 1971: 



Speeding 38 

Yellow line 21 

Stop sign and stop 

light violations 17 
Defective equipment 7 
Operating uninspected 

vehicle 41 

Operating without 

license 13 

Operating after 

suspension 6 

Operating unregistered 

vehicle 5 

Misuse of plates 2 
Wreckless operation 1 
Failure to keep right 

of traveled way 2 
Driving while 

intoxicated 5 

Violation of minimum 

tread depth 2 

Operating under influence 

of drugs 1 

Operating motor cycle 

without eye shield 2 
Operating motor cycle 

without head gear 1 
Speed accident 

resulting 2 

Stopping without signal 1 
Stopping on traveled 

way 1 

Allowing improper 

person to operate 4 
Operating without proof 

of financial respon- 
sibility 4 
Assault on police 

officer 2 

Larceny 2 

Disorderly conduct 3 
Attempted burgulary 1 



Failure to grant right-of-way 1 

Overweight truck 3 

Operating unsafe vehicle 1 

Unauthorized use of vehicle 1 

Wrong way one way street 1 
Operating without use of fuel 

license 1 
Improper conduct after an 

accident 1 

Hit and run 2 

Fishing during closed season 1 

Non-support 1 

Possession of beer by minor 1 

Larceny by check 1 

Derisive words 2 

Drunkeness 4 

Display of fireworks 1 

Lacivious act 1 

Fugitive from justice 1 
Attempt to obtain money by 

false pretenses 4 
Failure to obtain building 

permit 7 
Assault 12 
Receiving stolen property 4 
Operating unregistered snow- 
mobile 2 
Failure to stop for police 

officer 3 

Kindling fire without permit 2 

Violation of leash law 4 

Failure to procure dog license 4 
Possession of controlled 

drugs 2 

Total 248 



Respectfully submitted, 

J, Albert Lynch, Justice 
Edwin M. Hartz, Clerk 



40 



NASHUA REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION 



At the present time all but two towns, Mason and Mont Vernon, 
have joined the thirteen town region. While the commission members 
were organizing the commission, arranging for a federal planning assistance 
grant and searching for staff planners, the membership assessment to towns 
was $.15 per capita. With the new staff and office obtained in mid- 1971 
the membership levy has been increased to $.25 per capita to cover the 
expense of the commission as an operating agency. 

Now fully staffed, the Nashua Regional Planning Commission is 
approximately half way through its first year's program which includes the 
following activities: 

1. An assessment of the future growth potential 
of the region. 

2. Analysis of regional housing problems. 

3. Preparation of a regional land use plan. 

4. Preparation of a regional sewer plan. 

5. Advisory assistance to local planning boards, 

6. Preparation of a regional solid waste management plan. 

7. Coordination of federal grant-in-aid expenditures in 
the region. 

8. Review of federal construction projects in the region. 

9. Several projects of sub-regional significance. 

In addition to ote Commission's monthly meetings, the members are 
assigned to the following committees which also meet monthly: 

1. Land Use Planning Committee 

2. Housing Study Committee 

3. Solid Waste Planning Committee - East of the Merrimack River 

4. Solid Waste Planning Committee - West of the Merrimack River 

5. Sewer Planning Committee 

6« Transportation Planning Committee 

Other committees are established from time to time to study specific 
problems as they arise. In most cases committee memberships are supplemented 
by citizen members from towns most apt to be concerned with the particular 
committee's activity. 

Ann H. Bischoff 
Clifton E. Hayes 



41 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



I herewith present my annual report of the activities of the Pelham 
Police Department from January 1, 1971 through December 31, 1971. 

There was a considerable increase in calls over the previous year as 
the records will show. There are some persons who are of the opinion that 
we could eliminate our special officers as we continue to put more full 
time men on to handle these calls. Most towns have a complement of special 
officers that they fall back on. They are summoned to work when regular 
officers become disabled or sick, cover the vacation periods and when the 
regular officers are on their regular days off. Our special officers have 
been more in demand this past year than ever before. They have assisted 
in a number of the serious accidents and aided the department in several 
special investigations. In the case of a serious accident the regular 
officers can only attend to the immediate need, while specials are called 
on to assist with directing traffic, etc. Often a special officer will 
work from his own personal car to help in apprehending suspicious persons 
or a known housebreaker where it would be too obvious to use a cruiser. 
Our regular officers have also used their own cars many times. 

At present we are taking advantage of two phases of special police 
training schools. Several of the special officers are attending a one 
night a week, two hour session in Goffstown sponsored by the Sheriff's 
Department, This school runs from January to June. These men are attending 
the school on their own time and at their own expense. This is the first 
time that a school has been available to these men in accomodating their 
free time. Also, at present one of our newest regular officers is attending 
a school on basic police training at the Pembrook Conference Center in 
Pembrook. This school is sponsored by the New Hampshire State Police and 
requires the officer to remain at the school from Monday through Friday, 
as many of the programs taught are carried into twenty- four hour sessions. 

I want to commend by regular officers for an outstanding job this 
past year. They have been successful in apprehending several house- 
breakers and suspicious persons. In one case, through the alertness of 
the late-night men, a considerable amount of radios and televisions, 
amounting to thousands of dollars, was confiscated and returned to a 
Haverhill, Massachusetts, department store. 

We recently installed two, four channel mobile radios in our cruisers. 
We are now in direct contact from our cruisers to State Police Headquarters 
in Concord, car to car state police cruisers, Hillsborough County Seeriff's 
Department, and our base station which includes about twelve nearby towns. 
The radios were purchased through federal crime funds and the program was 
endorsed by the towns people at the last town meeting, 

I have submitted an application to the Federal Crime Commission to 
obtain an alcohol breath testing machine. This is an outright grant from 
the commission with no cost to the town. A new law requires that a man 
be specially trained in order to operate this machine. The commission will 
also furnish this training at no cost. This added equipment will save 



42 



many miles for our cruisers and much time for our officers who now have to 
travel about eleven miles to Nashua in order to have this examination done, 

I have also made application for funds to purchase a radar unit under 
matching funds from the New Hampshire Highway Safety Agency. This is the 
same agency that our dispatch service is funded under, and has afforded us 
to have one of the best informed and efficient departments in the state. I 
request your support of the item in my budget asking for twenty-four hour 
dispatching. Persons coming from areas where they have had emergency ser- 
vices at their finger tips are demanding this. We should have someone on 
duty full time who can stay right with an emergency. Our emergencies are 
becoming more frequest. Also, more than ever, we need lock up facilities. 
Countless hours and time for our men and our cruisers v^ill be alleviated 
when Dur new police station is in service, whereby we will have our own fa- 
cilities. A full-time dispatcher at the station will be required in order 
to attend to any prisoners who may become sick and need a doctor or in case 
of a fire, etc. It is also imperative that we have a person on duty twenty- 
four hours a day in view of the recent vandalisms at police quarters through 
out the country. 

I wish to thank the townspeople for their continued cooperation and 
support this past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RALPH S. BOUTWELL 
CHIEF OF POLICE 



SPECIAL POLICE AND SCHOOL GUARD PAYROLL: 



Willis H Atwood 
Wayne Bariteau 
James Berry 
Roland Boucher 
David Curran 
William Dowling 
Bernard Flanders 
Frank Foisie 
Gottfried Herkomer 
Arthur Hilbert 
Alton Hodgman 



$ 553.50 

1,015.47 

83.25 

69.39 

384.50 

92.50 

151.13 

4.50 

74.25 

492.00 

513.00 



Robert Hutchinson 
Mitchell Kopacz 
Raymond Malburne 
Maurice Nantel 
Stewart Nash 
John Newcomb 
Neil Parmenter 
Arthur Provencal 
Herbert Richardson 
Roy Silloway 
Charles Yerger 



273.00 
396.00 
166.02 
571.50 
128.25 
490.50 
88.89 
489.00 
263.25 
793.50 
735.75 



$7,829.15 



43 



DISPATCH SERVICE PAYROLL: 



RACE TRAFFIC PAYROLL; 



Willis H Atwood 


$ 


145.13 


Wayne Bariteau 




420.82 


James Berry- 




781.86 


Roland Boucher 




9.00 


Russell Corbin 




78.75 


David Curran 


1 


,729.13 


Ralph Daley 




450.00 


Glennie Edwards 


1 


,147.64 


Bernard Flanders 




9.00 


Dorothy Hardy 


2 


,639.18 


Robert Hutchinson 




248.62 


W. David Lyon 




441.00 


Maurice Nantel 




411.75 


Stewart Nash 




87.75 


John Newcomb 




127.13 


Charles Yerger 




101.24 




$9: 


,828.00 



Willis H Atwood 
Wayne Bariteau 
Ralph Boutwell 
Arthur Hilbert 
Alton Hodgman 
Robert Hutchinson 
Maurice Nantel 
John Newcomb 
Herbert Richardson 
Roy Silloway 
Charles Yerger 



$ 90.00 

22.50 

9.00 

19.50 

87.75 

123.75 

168.75 

202.50 

343.50 

285.75 

54.00 

$1,407.00 



44 



THE TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT 

TAXES COLLECTED 

Property taxes, 1970 $ 116,510.24 

Property taxes, 1971 1,287,899.47 

Tax Sales Redeemed 13,985.58 

Interest 5,063.14 

Head taxes, 1970 2,880.00 

Head tax penalties, 1970 271.00 

Poll tax, 1970 1,002.00 

Poll tax penalties, 1970 94.60 

Resident taxes, 1971 24,100.00 

Resident tax penalties, 1971 91.00 

Yield taxes, 1971 877.35 

National Bank Stock, 1971 .50 



Total Receipts, Tax Collector $ 1,452,774.88 

Total parcels of properties 2,421 



UNPAID TAXES as of DECEMBER 31, 1971 

Resident taxes, 1971 $ 6,040.00 

Property taxes, 1969 150.48 

Property taxes, 1971 125,928.29 



Total Uncollected $ 132,118.77 



45 



WATER STUDY COMMITTEE 



This past year was an active year for the Pelham Water Study 
Committee, During the spring the Committee interviewed nearly a dozen 
engineering firms. Approximately six were asked to submit engineering 
proposals. 

Upon the recommendation of the Water Study Committee, the Selectmen 
retained the engineering firm of Fenton G, Keyes Associates, This firm 
has begun a preliminary engineering survey of the Town of Pelham and, 
pursuant to the terms of the contract with the town, will submit a 
detailed engineering report. This report will contain the following: 

1. A description of the purpose of the survey, 

2. A description of the scope of the survey. 

3. A description of the survey area, 

4. A description of the need for establishing a water supply and 
distribution system in Pelham, 

5. A description of the problems involved in establishing a water 
supply system for Pelham, 

6. Hydrologic data, 

7. Surficial geology. 

8. A population study. 

9. A water consumption study. 

10, A study of possible water supply sources. 

11, A systematic layout of the distribution system, 

12, Preliminary designs for pumping stations, storage facilities 
and treatment systems, 

13, Detailed estimates of cost, 

14, Methods of financing, 

15, A description of the means and methods of operating a town 
water system, 

16, A description of the relationship of Pelham' s water program with 
its neighboring towns, 

17, Conclusions and recommendations. 

Subsequent to the employment of the engineers, members of the Water 
Committee began negotiations for options on land which the engineers 
felt should be tested to ascertain whether they would and could be used 
for well sites. Many property owners were contacted. Options were ob- 
tained on twenty-five acres north of Hobbs Road, and west of Simpson 
Mill Road, on twelve acres east of Willow Street, on twelve acres south 
of Chagnon Lane and on two parcels east of Windham Road and west of Rita 
Avenue. One parcel contained more than twenty-six acres. The other con- 
tained about six acres. In addition, seven acres were purchased ad- 
jacent to two ten acre parcels already owned by the Town, 

All of the above sites, plus the Memorial School site and the proposed 
high school site were tested by a crew of well testers. With the ex- 
ception of two sites, none produced an adequate amount of water. The 
Memorial School site produced an interesting volume of water, but the 
iron content was well above acceptable standards. The site west of 
Windham Road provided water of good quality, but only marginal quantity. 



46 



Ledge was encountered at 23 feet at the proposed high school site. 
Consequently, no water was pumped. 

In summary, to date we have not been able to locate a desirable 
water supply. Notwithstanding, the Water Commission and the Conserva- 
tion Committee recommend that the options on the property east of Windham 
Road and west of Rita Avenue be exercised. While this site produced 
only a marginal amount of water, it is felt that the two pieces of proper- 
ty under option should be purchased for conservation, recreation and 
possibly water supply uses. Together with the presently owned town 
land, the area is composed of more than sixty acres, all located near 
Pelham Center. Golden Brook runs down the middle of this property and 
the Town has access from both Rita Avenue and Windham Road. 

Looking forward to this year's activities, the Committee has 
requested an appropriation of $7,500.00. It is expected that it will be 
expended as follows: 

Land Surveys $2,500.00 
Land Options 2,500.00 
Well Testing 2,500.00 

This year's failure to locate an acceptable water supply underscores 
the need to act now. Each year potential well sites are developed for 
other uses. It is estimated that wells for the Sherburne School addition 
and the proposed high school may run as high as $35,000.00 each. The 
Memorial School system cost over $30,000.00 and is marginal. However, 
we are told that given the right well field, a well adequate to supply 
the entire Town could be installed for much less than the anticipated 
combined cost of the Memorial, Sherburne and high school wells. 

The engineering firm will complete its study this year. This report 
will be far more meaningful, if it is based on a ;knownwater source. 
For this reason, it is requested that the water appropriation be given 
favorable consideration by the voters. 



Respectfully submitted, 

William T. Hayes, Chairman Robert Fletcher 
David Curran Albert Nolin 

Joseph DeCarolis James Powers 



47 



VITAL STATISTICS 



Births recorded in the Town of Pelham, N.H. for 1971: 



Date 



Place 



S ex Name 



Name of Father 
Maiden Name of Mother 



Jan, 1 Lawrence, Mass. M 

Jan. 3 Lawrence, Mass. M 

Jan. 3 Lowell, Mass. F 

Jan. 5 Lowell, Mass. M 

Jan. 9 Nashua, N.H. M 

Jan. 12 Lowell, Mass. F 

Jan 12 Methuen, Mass. M 

Jan. 13 Methuen, Mass. M 

Jan. 17 Lowell, Mass. F 

Jan. 24 Lowell, Mass. F 

Jan. 24 Lowell, Mass. F 

Jan. 25 Lowell, Mass. M 

Jan. 31 Methuen, Mass. M 

Jan. 31 Methuen, Mass. M 

Feb. 2 Lowell, Mass. F 

Feb. 9 Nashua, N.H. F 

Feb. 9 Lowell, Mass. M 



Feb. 9 Lowell, Mass. M 



Feb. 10 Manchester, N.H. M 
Feb. 14 Lowell, Mass. F 
Feb. 14 Lowell, Mass. M 



^ 



eb. 15 Nashua, N.H. 



F 



Michael Ward Collins Jr. 
Robert Payson Goodwin 
Kristine Lee Therriault 
Paul Emile Martineau 
Todd Michael Danis 
Terri Elizabeth Gleason 
Christopher Scott Grenda 
Robert Steven Hamlin 
Christine Elizabeth Lapo 
Michelle Mary Bastek 
Claudine Anne Leclercq 
Phillip Christopher Apos 
Todd Wendel Ciaciuch 
Peter Michael DiLello 
Cheri Lynne Ploof 
Lynn Marie Hill 
Michael Edmund Marsden 
Todd James Tremblay 
Gerald Edward Tessier Jr 
Kelly Ann Collins 
Michael Paul Shaughnessy 
Linda Ellen Egerton 



Michael Ward Collins 
Sandra Lee Tatro 
Payson Henry Goodwin, Jr. 
Sandra Anne Marroni 
Ronald William Therriault 
Iris Chiasson 
Paul Emile Martineau 
Judith Joyce Helm 
Gerard Joseph Danis 
Nancy Gertrude Ledoux 
Edmund Joseph Gleason 
Mary Claire Clark 
Robert Brien Grenda 
Janice Marie Rogers 
Warren Gardner Hamlin 
Patricia Ann Menna 

int Edmund Lewis Lapoint 
Patricia Anne Edwards 
Edward Joseph Bastek 
June Ann Steiner 
Claude Aramis Leclercq 
Phyllis Anne Stecchi 

tolakos C.P. Apostolakos 
C.A. Sadowski 
Donald Walter Ciaciuch 
Sandra Kay Boulay 
Thomas Peter DiLello 
Jo-Ellen Milinazzo 
Roger Raymond Ploof 
Mary Dorothy Decelle 
Max Garland Hill 
Eileen Madeline Bedard 
Robert Richard Marsden 
Dorothy Ann Donnelly 
James Paul Tremblay 
Stephanie Lucille Jones 
Gerald Edward Tessier Sr. 
Laurel Virginia Andem 
Harold Thomas Collins 
Jaline Ann Cognac 
Paul Vincent Shaughnessy 
Jane Estelle McLaughlin 
James Arthur Egerton 
Linda Marie Floyd 



48 



Births, continued 



Date 



Place 



Sex 



Name 



Name of Father 
Maiden Name of Mother 



Feb. 17 Lowell, Mass. F 

Feb. 18 Lowell, Mass. F 

Feb. 28 Lowell, Mass. M 

Mar. 5 Methuen, Mass. M 

Mar. 8 Lowell, Mass. F 

Mar. 15 Lowell, Mass. F 

Mar. 16 Lawrence, Mass. F 

Mar. 17 Haverhill, Mass. F 

Mar. 19 Methuen, Mass. M 

Mar. 21 Lowell, Mass. F 



Mar, 25 Lowell, Mass. M 



Mar. 26 Lowell, Mass. F 

Mar. 27 Lawrence, Mass. M 

Mar. 28 Lowell, Mass. M 

Mar. 29 Lowell, Mass. F 

Mar. 31 Lowell, Mass. F 

Apr. 1 Nashua, N.H, F 

Apr. 2 Lowell, Mass. F 

Apr. 3 Nashua, N.H. F 

Apr. 8 Lowell, Mass. F 

Apr. 25 Woburn, Mass. M 

Apr. 28 Lowell, Mass. M 

May 8 Beverly, Mass. F 

May 10 Lowell, Mass. F 



Keri Tly McCormack 
Karen Lynne Hanson 
Derek Lloyd Sampson 
Arend Joseph McCabe 



Brian Michael McCormack 
Michele Anne Lor rain 
Herman Lawrence Hanson 
Shirley Mae Butterfield 
Richard Lloyd Sampson 
Gisele Regina Bougie 
John Joseph McCabe 
Nancy Patricia Kelley 

Suzanne Michelle Bilodeau Paul Emile Bilodeau 

Katharina Schwa rz 

Kristen Estelle Coleman Alvin Frederick Coleman 

Kathleen Mary Donnelly 

Amy Jeanne Westcott David Francis Westcott 

Diann Grace Slocombe 

Julie Ann Hamilton Rufus D. Hamilton 

Beth Holbrook 

Brendan Patrick Harrington Kevin Jeremiah Harringtc 

Winifred Connor 
John Louis Reidy 
Donna Maria Dean 
Roderick Oscar Bulmer 
Paulette Jeannie Morin 
Robert Edward Hayes 
Diane Fay DeCarteret 
Harry Rowland Simpson 
Alberta Joan Mansur 

Charles Walter Therriault Jr. C.W. Therriault 

Linda Louise Stevens 
John Walter Zolkos 
Elaine Therese Jubinville 
Frederick Kenneth Rourke 
Joyce Bunny James 
Alfred Louis Levesque 
Carol Ann Mull in 
Nicholas Charles Sarris 
Elizabeth Louise Cate 
Robert Leroy Livingston 
Jo Ann Marie Dancause 
Gerard Arthur Savard 
Mary Rita Mitchell 
R.W, Paste 
Pauline Marie Wright 

John Weldon Sussenberger John Bacot Sussenberger 

Elsie Janet Weigert 

Terri Ann Farrell John Phillip Farrell 

Claire Theresa Soucy 

Renee Debra Boisvert Rene Alphonse Boisvert 

Simonne Gabriel LeDuc 



Lisa Marie Reidy 
Chris Gene Bulmer 
Jennifer Lynne Hayes 
Scott Douglas Simpson 



Darcy Lyn Zolkos 
Tracy Lynn Rourke 
Crystal Lee Levesque 
Nicole Frances Sarris 
Bobbie Jo Livingston 
Karen Ann Savard 
Robert William Paste Jr. 



49 



Births, continued 



Date 



Place 



Sex Name 



Name of Father 
Maiden Name of Mother 



May 10 
May 14 
May 25 
May 29 
May 30 
Jun, 2 
Jun, 4 
Jun. 7 
Jun. 9 
Jun. 14 
Jun. 14 
Jun. 14 
Jun. 16 
Jun. 18 
Jun. 21 
Jun. 23 
Jul. 1 
Jul. 3 
Jul. 4 
Jul. 4 
Jul. 5 

Jul. 10 

I 

Jul. 14 
Jul. 20 



Lowell, Mass. F 

Methuen, Mass. M 

Lowell, Mass. F 

Lowell, Mass. F 

Lowell, Mass. M 

Lawrence, Mass, M 

Lowell, Mass. M 

Lowell, Mass. M 

Methuen, Mass. F 

Methuen, Mass. M 

Methuen, Mass. F 

Lowell, Mass. F 

Lowell, Mass. M 

Nashua, N.H. M 

Lawrence, Mass. F 

Methuen, Mass. M 

Methuen, Mass. M 

Lowell, Mass, F 

Nashua, N.H. M 

Lowell, Mass. M 

Lowell, Mass. M 

Lowell, Mass. M 

Nashua, N.H. F 

Methuen, Mass. F 



Hope Charlotte Christie 
Matthew Charles Wieland 



David Michael Christie 
Cheryl Louise Malburne 
Alfred Charles Wieland 
Darlene Ellen Frigon 
Paul Henry Rourke 
Kathleen Ann Neylon 
Kenneth Maurice Inamorati 
Eileen Mary Gauthier 
David Joseph Parece 
Florence Mae Harring 
Christopher John Williamson John A. Williamson 

Judith Marie Kujansuu 



Erin Rourke 



Sheri Lynn Inamorati 



Kris Paul Parece 



Stephen Daniel Thing 
Kevin James Wilkins 



Michele Denise Mills 



Ra)nnond Bartlett Thing 
Marilyn Louise Quinlan 
Raymond Thomas Wilkins 
Dorothea Marie Ready 
Roger Edward Mills 
Paula Joan Murphy 

Joseph Anthony Formichelli Jr. J. A, Formichelli 

Barbara Ellen Welky 

Erin Victoria Murphy John Leon Murphy 

Marylee Huston 

Nanette Lynn Tuttle Nelson Arthur Tuttle 

Lillian Mary Stone 

George Charles Sarris III George Charles Sarris 

Donna Joanne Gagnon 

Paul Ernest Beauregard Ernest Robert Beauregard 

Virginia Elizabeth Pike 
Edward William Hurrell 
Phyllis Mary Solaqua 
Donald William Koberski 
Judith Ann Mattes 

Richard Hugh Ratcliffe Jr. Richard Hugh Ratcliffe 

Gail May Balfour 



Rachel Ann Hurrell 



William Donald Koberski 



Lori Beth Dozibrin 
Kevin John Barton 
Joseph Trouville 
Richard Phillip Tellier 
Paul Robert Baudette 
Kendall May Bennett 
Dawn Renee Dallaire 



Andrew John Dozibrin 
Linda Jo Couveia 
Albert Thomas Barton 
Marilyn Alice Sturtevant 
Francis J. Trouville Jr. 
Linda Marguerite Gorman 
Richard Paul Tellier 
Joanne McFadden 
David Gaudette 
Barbara Marie Kelley 
James Lester Bennett Jr. 
Daryl Ann Vitale 
George Joseph Dallaire 
Frances Sandra Blaisdell 



50 



Births, continued 



Date 



Place 



S ex Name 



Name of Father 
Maiden Name of Mother 



Jul. 21 Lawrence, Mass, 



Jul. 23 Lowell, Mass. 



Jul, 27 Lowell 



Jul. 27 Lowell 



Aug. 2 
Aug. 4 
Aug. 5 
Aug. 8 



Nashua 



Lowell 



Lowell 



Lowe 1 1 



Aug. 9 Methuen, Mass 



Aug. 18 Lowell 

Aug. 18 Lowell 

Aug. 29 Lowell 

Aug. 30 Lowell 

Sept. 3 Lowell 

Sept. 10 Nashua 

Sept. 10 Nashua 

Sept. 14 Lowell 



Sept. 23 Methuen, Mass 



Sept. 26 Lowell 
Sept. 27 Lowell 
Sept. 27 Lowell 



Oct, 1 Lowell 



Oct. 4 



Nashua 



Mass. 



Mass, 



N.H. 



Mass, 



Mass, 



Mass, 



Mass. 



Mass, 



Mass, 



Mass, 



Mass, 



N.H. 



N.H. 



Mass. 



Mass. 



Mass. 



Mass. 



Mass. 



N.H. 



F Christine Louise Didion 



F Angela Denise Vaillancourt 



M Keith James Hamel 

M Brad Victor Presa 

M Christopher Scot Paquette 

M Leo Richard Creegan Jr. 

F Judi Grace Melton 

F Erica Marie Leclercq 

F Kristin Keslo 

M Matthew Byron Borsa 

F Sandra Jean Murphy 

F Jennifer Lee Nagle 

M Bernard Frances Johnston 

M Barry Joseph Lavoie 

M Keith Patrick Tibbetts 

M Kevin Paul Tibbetts 

M Chad George Beauregard 

F Diane Lise Demers 

F Andronike Neofotistos 

F Katrina Lynn Hartlen 

M kichael Joseph Wagner 

F Brneda Marie Madsen 

M Christopher James Brown 



Robert Sylvester Didion Jr 
Marie Elaine Kearney 
Robert L. Vaillancourt 
Constance Guilbeault 
Arthur Joseph Hamel 
Lilliam Irene Seamans 
Joseph Anthony Presa 
Rosalie Anne Arsenault 
Emile Joseph Paquette Jr. 
Sandra Mary Zaricki 
Leo Richard Creegan 
Judith Ann Walsh 
Monty Teague Melton 
Ingeborg Maria Tauber 
Daniel Joseph Leclercq 
Barbara Jo Quatrino 
Francis John Keslo 
Joyce Agnes Moffit 
Andrew John Borsa 
Margaret Rita Donovan 
Walter Richard Murphy 
Susan Merriel Parrott 
Thomas Paul Nagle 
Mareen Marguerite McCusker 
III Bernard F, Johnston II 
Shirley Doris Smith 
Arthur Joseph Lavoie 
Janet Mary Taylor 
Michael Alden Tibbetts 
Cynthia Joyce Brettell 
Michael Alden Tibbetts 
Cynthia Joyce Brettell 
Robert George Beauregard 
Kathleen Ann Landry 
Jean Guy Demers 
Gisele Therese Desparois 
Paul Louis Neofotistos 
Faith Delazanos 
Blaine A. Hartlen 
Mary Nancy Ingerson 
Charles Francis Wagner Sr 
Anne Marie Power 
George Ronald Madsen 
Patricia Ann Read 
Richard Jeoffrey Brown 
Margaret Mary Walsh 



I 



51 



Births, continued 



Date 



Place 



S ex Name 



Name of Father 
Maiden Name of Mother 



Oct, 4 Lowell, Mass. M 

Oct. 9 Lowell, Mass. F 

Oct. 13 Nashua, N.H. M 

Oct. 15 Lowell, Mass. M 



Oct. 29 

Oct. 30 

Nov. 1 

Nov. 1 

Mov. 31 

Nov. 14 

Nov. 16 

Nov. 18 

Nov. 20 

Nov. 24 

Dec. 2 

Dec, 3 

Dec. 7 



Christopher James Miller 



Tina Louise Mendes 



James Alan Nelson 



Robert James Cullinan 



Oct. 16 Lawrence, Mass. F Elizabeth Lynn Hayes 



Oct. 16 Methuen, Mass. 

Oct. 16 Lowell, Mass. 

Oct, 19 Lowell, Mass. 

Oct, 27 Lowell, Mass, 

Oct, 29 Nashua, N.H. 



M Scott Ray 



Lowell, Mass. 
Derry, N.H. 

Lowell, Mass. 

Lowell, Mass. 

Newton, Mass. 

Nashua, N.H. 

Nashua, N.H, 

Lowell, Mass. 



Tara Anne Travers 



M Michael Lawton Bevens 



F Marie Yvonne Foisy 
F Stephanie Anna Lynde 
M Clint John St. Onge 



M John Paul Gerakines 



M Joseph Kent Brunelle 



F Erica Marie Crofts 



M Stephen Joseph DePaula Jr, 
M Stephen Alan Ferrency 



M John David Sheehan 



Cynthia Therese Mercier 



Haverhill, Mass. F Leah Barbara Souza 



Lowell, Mass, 

Nashua, N.H. 

Lowell, Mass. 

Lowell, Mass. 



M 



Karen Rose Nicolosi 



Rebecca Joy McDevitt 
James Michael Betty 
Kimberley Joy Harris 



George Robert Miller 
Diane Joyce Watson 
Daniel Anthony Mendes 
Lorraine Rita Barsalou 
Stanley Roy Nelson Jr, 
Maureen Regina Grinley 
Robert James Cullinan 
Suzanne Catherine Parent 
William Thomas Hayes 
Judith Ann Flanders 
Robert Andrew Ray 
Joyce Anne Beane 
Arthur Gerald Travers 
Carol Anne McQuaid 
Michael Lawton Bevens 
Beverley Victoria Wallin 
Roger W. Foisy 
Marie E, McQuade 
William Arnold Lynde 
Catherine Ann Ledoux 
Alfred Joseph St, Onge 
Harriet Vlahos 
John Gerakines 
Brenda Joyce Vance 
Donald Henry Brunelle 
Diane Marieanna Martineau 
William Lawrence Crofts 
Barbara Ann Caisse 

Stephen Joseph DePaula 

Nancy Gill 
Stephen Arthur Ferrency 
Jacquelyn Louise Richard 
Donald Sheehan 
Joy Alice Egerton 
Jean Guy Pierre Mercier 
Georgette Marie Levesque 
Joseph M. Souza 
Delia D'Ambrosio 
Carl Dana Nicolosi 
Janice Rose Jozokos 
William John McDevitt 
Joyce Elaine Angley 
Harry Louis Betty 
Sheila Ann Bierotti 
Thomas Edward Harris 
Barbara Louise Brooks 



52 



Births, continued 



Date 



Place 



Sex Name 



Name of Father 
Maiden Name of Mother 



Dec. 9 Lowell, Mass. 
Dec. 23 Lovell, Mass. 



M Troy Douglas Co Hinge 
F Lisa Renee Kennedy- 



Douglas McArthur Co Hinge 
Therese Marie Ferriera 
Timothy Alan Kennedy 
Leslie Marguerite Brashears 




A PAGE from the 1894 Record of Births on file in the 
Town Clerk's office. 



53 



Marriages recorded in the Town of Pelham, N.H. for 1971: 



Date 



Name 



Residence 



Jan. 6 

Jan. 15 

Jan. 20 

Jan. 24 

Feb. 13 

Feb. 14 

Feb. 20 

Feb. 26 

Feb. 26 

Mar. 6 

Mar. 12 

Mar. 27 

Mar. 28 

Apr. 16 

Apr. 17 

Apr. 24 



Daniel Henry Haigh 
Donna Barbara Atwood 



Methuen, Mass. 
Lawrence, Mass. 



Norman Gordon Gosse Jr. Chelmsford, Mass. 
Virginia Caroline Gendreau Lowell, Mass. 



Warren Joseph Brothers 
Eunice Elizabeth Cibene 

Spiros Zousoumas 
Ellen Mary Vivier 

William Joseph Lannon 
Virginia Frances Butora 

Alan Robert Lawrence 
Lynda Carol Keyes 

Paul Albert Cimon 
Arlene Hamel Vass 

Richard Joseph Briere 
Debra Jo Dluant 

William Lawrence Crofts 
Barbara Ann Caisse 

Gerald Gerard Green 
Ann Louise Dougherty 

James Pitts Emerson III 
Brenda Rose Boda 

Anthony Daniel Obdens 
Maureen LaCrosse 

John Waldron Burke 
Virginia LaCourse 

Raymond Edward Hamel 
Norma Ellen Ducharme 

Gerard Roger Labbe 
Floria Priscilla McDuffee 

William Francis Dowling 
Barbara Lee Ducharme 



Tewksbury, Mass. 
Tewksbury, Mass. 

Bedford, Mass, 
Dracut, Mass. 

Some rvi lie, Mass. 
Somervillee Mass. 

Pelham, N.H. 
Salem, N.H, 

Lowell, Mass. 

Fort Lauderdale, Fla, 

Pelham, N.H. 
Nashua, N.H. 

Lowell, Mass. 
Pelham, N.H. 

Dracut, Mass. 
Dracut, Mass. 

Pelham, N.H, 
Windham, N.H, 

Tewksbury, Mass, 
Tewksbury, Mass, 

Billerica, Mass, 
Lowell, Mass, 

Lawrence, Mass, 
Lawrence, Mass, 

Forge Village, Mass. 
Dracut, Mass. 

Pelham, N.H. 
Pelham, N.H. 



54 



Marriages, continued 



Date 



Name 



Residence 



Apr. 


, 24 


May- 


1 


May 


8 


May- 


15 


May 


16 


May 


18 


May 


22 


May 


29 


May 


29 


Jun, 


4 


Jun, 


12 



George Paul Muldoon Lowell, Mass. 
Jacqueline Patricia Willard Lowell, Mass, 



Richard Bisson 

Martha Louise Bergeron 

Richard Allen Scott 
Christine Masella 

Dennis H. Dwire 
Paula J, Latour 

Donald Armand Ayotte 
Pamela Jane Weinhold 

Paul David Dunn 

Margaret Elizabeth Glaude 

Harold Joseph Leclair Jr. 
Mildred Veronica Rice 

Frank Owen Lane 
Sharon Brenda Ward 

Kerry James Stowell 
Cecile Doris Fauvel 



Pelham, N.H. 
Pelham, N.H. 

Lowell, Mass. 
Pelham, N.H. 

Hudson, N.H. 
Pelham, N.H. 

Lawrence, Mass. 
Pelham, N.H. 

Westford, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 

No. Tewksbury, Mass, 
Lowell, Mass. 

Pelham, N.H, 
Nashua, N.H. 

Pelham, N.H, 
Pelham, N.H. 



James Egerton Durling Londonderry, N.H, 

Marion Elizabeth Nicatra Londonderry, N,H. 

Richard Arnold Anderson Lowell, Mass. 

Charlotte Marie Millette Lowell, Mass. 



Jun. 19 



Jun. 19 



Gerald Frederick Anderson 
Mary Elizabeth Campbell 

Donald Arthur Fauvel 
Joan Catherine Maniatis 



Quincy, Mass. 

Newton, Mass, 

Pelham, N,H, 

Lowell, Mass, 



Jun, 22 



John Edwin Cann 
Ida Mae Lapham 



Lowell, Mass, 
Lowell, Mass, 



Jun, 25 



Jun, 25 



John Sinclair Colgan 
Gloria Jean Wilcox 

J, Robert Dubois 
Paula Ann Robinson 



Pelham, N.H, 
Burlington, Mass, 

Lawrence, Mass, 
Pelham, N,H, 



55 



Marriages, continued 



Date 



Name 



Residence 



Jun, 26 

Jun. 26 

Jul. 2 

Jul. 2 

Jul. 2 

Jul. 3 

Jul. 10 

Jul. 11 

Jul. 12 

Jul. 17 

Jul. 23 

Jul. 24 

Jul. 25 

Aug. 1 

Aug. 1 

Aug. 6 

Aug. 7 



Joseph Henry Correia III 
Patricia Irene King 

Paul Arthur Gendron 
Andrea Jean Roulx 

William Herbert Bell 
Juliann Marie Watson 

Alan Stanley Kostka 
Nancy Elizabeth Edwards 



Lowell, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 

Pelham, N.H. 
Belmont, N.H. 

Lynn, Mass. 
Lynn, Mass. 

Lowell, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 



Robert David Totman Woburn, Mass. 
Phyllis Corinne Christie Melrose, Mass. 

Paul Eric Lund Pelham, N.H, 

Antoinette Julienne Desrosiers Nashua, N.H. 



Paul Roger Leduc 
Janet Louise Bouchard 

John Michael DeFusco 
Linda Annis 

Richard Frank Nutile 
Jeannette Mary Messina 

Kevin John Canty 

Doretta Theresa Champagne 

William Charles Weldon 
Leanne Marie Masse 

Leon E. Spaulding 
Donna M. Landry 

Clifton Hayes 

Dorothy Elizabeth Roberto 

George Clarence Hills III 
Louise Jeanne Levesque 

Daniel Anthony Mendes Jr. 
Claudette Marie Stowell 

Richard Edward Young 
Jacalyn Marie Flanders 

Albert Ernest Barton 
Sophie Josephine Currier 



Tyngsboro, Mass. 
Tyngsboro, Mass. 

Lawrence, Mass. 
Pelham, N.H. 

Boston, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 

Nashua, N.H. 
Pelham, N.H. 

Hudson, N.H. 
Pelham, N.H, 

Hudson, N.H. 
Pelham, N.H. 

Pelham, N.Ho 
Pelham, N.H. 

Pelham, N.H. 
Nashua, NoH. 

Pelham, N.H. 
Pelham, N.H. 

Merrimac, Mass. 
Pelham, N.H, 

Pelham, N.H. 
Lawrence, Mass. 



56 



Marriages, continued 



Date 



Name 



Residence 



Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 9 
Aug. 14 
Aug. 14 
Aug. 14 
Aug. 20 
Aug , 2 1 
Aug. 27 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 
Sept. 5 
Sept. 24 
Sept. 26 



John Louis Gagnon 
Theresa Marie Neault 

Robert William Van Putten 
Deborah Anne Novell 

Gerald Donald Boisvert 
Linda Annmarie Gouveia 



Nashua, N.H. 
Pelham, N.H. 

Medford, Mass, 
Pelham, N.H. 

Lowell, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 



Thomas Joseph DiBenedetto Malverne, N.Y. 
Camellia Kathleen Ruggiero Malverne, N.Y. 



Carl Maurice Coulet 
Nancy Louise Lentz 

William Arnold Lynde 
Catherine Ann Ledoux 



Methuen, Mass, 
Pelham, N.H. 

Pelham, N.H. 
Derry, N.H. 



Ernest Alexander Higgins Jr. Plymouth, Mass. 
Mary Frances Kennedy Marshfield, Mass, 

William Joseph Zammikiel Chicago, 111. 
Patricia Ann Masella Chicago, 111. 



David Bruce Cutter 
Deborah Ann Elliott 

Henry J. Bodenrader 
Sheila M. Sutcliffe 

Michael Allen Einsidler 
Ellen Frances White 

Eugene Gerard Musial 
Mary Jeanne McElhinney 

Charles Otis Sheehan 
Winifred Mary Etsell 

Arthur Cemorelis 
Elaine Aldea Dumont 

Francis Joseph Morency 
Charlotte Irene Peach 

Dennis Martin Vieira 
Diane Mary Curtis 



Pelham, N.H. 
Salem, N.H. 

Pelham, N.H. 
Lawrence, Mass. 

Pelham, N.H. 
Boston, Mass. 

Lowell, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 

Marlboro, Mass. 
Marlboro, Mass. 

Lowell, Mass. 
Pelham, N.H. 

No. Billerica, Mass, 
Lowell, Mass. 

Lowell, Mass. 
Dracut, Mass. 



57 



Marriages, continued 



Date 



Name 



Residence 



Sept. 28 

Oct. 1 

Oct. 2 

Oct. 16 

Oct. 23 

Nov. 11 

Nov. 12 

Nov. 13 

Nov. 19 

Nov. 21 

Nov. 27 

Nov. 28 

Nov. 29 

Dec. 4 

Dec. 10 

Dec. 11 



Paul Michael Ryan 
Linda Joyce Lavoie 

Daniel Howard Morrissey 
Theresa Pearl Martin 



Tewksbury, Mass. 
Wilmington, Mass, 

Georgetown, Mass. 
Dracut, Mass. 



Maurice Arthur Tourville Dracut, Mass. 
Theresa Marguerite Lemieux Pelham, N.H, 



William J. Landry 
Irene Y. Montminy 

Robert Leroy Livingston 
JoAnn Marie Pattershall 

James Joseph Crider Jr. 
Doris Janet Pare 

Thomas Roy Neal 
Paula Ruth Hughes 

Joseph Timothy Zelonis 
Carol Ann Fraize 

Paul F. Snell 
Deborah S. Dexter 

Edmond Bis son 
Nina Maria Maglio 

John Richard Lynch 
Martha Sullivan 

William Alan Argie 
Brenda Susan Kelley 

Gary D. Rafferty 
Linda E. Musgrave 

Walter Jules Hamilton 
Kathleen Beatrice Smith 

William Thomas Stewart 
Susan Marie Yagjian 

Robert George Boisvert 
Nancy Jeanne tte Wittemen 



Lowell, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 

Pelham, N.H. 
Pelham, N.H. 

Dracut, Mass. 
Dracut, Mass. 

Forge Village, Mass, 
N. Chelmsford, Mass, 

Pelham, N.H. 
Salem, N.H. 

Hudson, N.H. 
Pelham, N.H. 

Pelham, N.H. 
Pelham, N.H. 

Maiden, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 

Billerica, Mass. 
Pelham, N.H, 

Pelham, N.H» 
Hudson, N.H. 

Tewksbury, Mass. 
Lowell, Mass. 

Pelham, N.H. 
Manchester, N.H, 

Pelham, N,H, 
Pelham, N,H, 



58 



Marriages, continued 



Date 



Name 



Residence 



Dec. 11 



Dec. 17 



Dec. 17 



Dec. 18 



Alan Joseph Dickey 
Helene Mabel Squeglia 



Lowell, Mass. 
Dracut, Mass. 



Thomas Alphonso Edward Quinlan Lowell, Mass. 
Patricia Ann McCartin Lowell, Mass. 

Jerome Norman Spinazola Nashua, N.H. 
Mildred Violet Tetreault Pelham, N.H. 

Norman Bertrum Lawrence Jr Pelham, N.H. 
Ginette Alden Toupin Lowell, Mass. 



Deaths recorded in the Town of Pelham, N.H. for 1971: 



Date of Death Name of Deceased 



Jan. 1 
Jan. 8 
Feb. 2 
Feb. 14 
Feb. 25 
Mar. 3 
Apr. 9 
Apr. 14 
Apr. 19 
Apr. 22 
May 24 
Jun. 2 
Jul. 4 



Maureen Ann Reilly 
George J. LeClair 
Stanley Lipsey 



James P. Christie 



Donna Lee Morin 



Ernest E. Washburn 



Francis L. Kleinotas 



George J. Landry 
George M. Muldoon 



Martha Strain 



Eileen Beaulieu 



Elizabeth Lehmann 



Joseph Trouville 



30 



Lowell, Mass. 



48 Lawrence, Mass. 

83 Pelham, N.H. 

46 Lowell, Mass. 

12 Boston, Mass. 

66 Lawrence, Mass. 
54 Lowell, Mass. 
60 Pelham, N.H, 

91 Pelham, N.H. 

67 Lowell, Mass. 
58 Hudson, N.H. 
72 Derry, N.H, 

2 Hrs. Lowell, Mass. 



59 



Deaths, continued 



Date of Death Name of Deceased 



Age Place of Death 



Jul. 5 

Jul. 8 

Jul. 28 

Aug. 6 

Aug. 7 

Aug. 15 

Aug. 19 

Oct. 10 

Oct. 13 

Oct. 16 

Oct. 27 

Oct. 27 

Nov. 21 

Dec. 22 



William D. Smith 



Joseph A. Dowling 
Mary Zolkos 



92 Nashua, N.H. 
67 Methuen, Mass. 
81 Pelham, N.H. 



Arthur Theodore Tillotson 65 Pelham, N.H. 



Laura Gauthier 



Elzear Joseph Lemieux 



Steven J. Levi 



Melvin John Washburn 



Helen Richardson 



Scott Ray- 



Richard Currier 



Joseph E. Ramos 



Haven A. S trout 



Winfield A. Pickford 



66 Lowell, Mass. 

75 Lawrence, Mass. 

22 Methuen, Mass. 

64 Pelham, N.H. 



85 



Lowell, Mass, 



10 Hrs. Methuen, Mass, 
82 Boston, Mass. 
48 Pelham, N.H. 
67 Lowell, Mass. 
66 Lowell, Mass. 



Bodies Brought to the Town of Pelham, N.H. for Burial for 1971: 



Date of Death Name of Deceased 



Jan. 17 
Jan. 25 
Feb. 27 
Mar. 15 
Apr. 9 



Infant Girl Houle 



Stanley Kapala 



Cecil Gordon Rhodes 



Ernest 0. Smith 



Henry A. Ducharme 



Age From 



9 Min. Nashua, N.H. 



67 



89 



New York 



65 Lawrence, Mass. 



Lowell, Mass, 



58 Nashua, N.H. 



60 



Bodies brought to Pelham, continued 



Apr. 24 
May 4 
May 19 
May 21 
Jun. 1 
Jun, 6 
Jun, 11 
Jun, 17 
Jul, 15 
Sept. 13 
Sept. 28 
Oct, 13 
Oct, 23 
Nov, 30 
Dec, 29 



Elizabeth Rowntree 



Edward John Gawlowicz 



Fred R, Tillotson 



Gertrude M, White 



Sophie (Hebert) O'Connor 



Ina Cochran 



Martin Mathew Sopel 
Albert J, Byrne 
Anne B, Landry 



Cheri Lee Guerin 



Albert W. Such 



Alfred E. Fox 



Lydia M. Jubinville 



Talbert Aaron Buttrick 



Frances (Hobbs) McLucas 



76 Lowell, Mass, 



53 California 



71 Maine 



73 Dracut, Mass. 

64 Holyoke, Mass. 

94 Haverhill, Mass, 

75 Nashua, N,H. 

80 Lowell, Mass. 



71 Salem, N.H. 



2 Mo. Cambridge, Mass, 



80 California 



87 Dracut, Mass. 

86 Michigan 

98 Londonderry, N.H< 



82 Newton, Mass, 



61 



TRUST FUNDS 



COMMON TB 


.UST "A" 
Name 


P 


RINCIPAL 






INCOME 






Date 


Bal. 


Capital 


Balance 


Bal. 


Income 


Spent 


Bal. 


of 


of 


Beg. 


Gain 


End 


Beg. 


During 


During 


End 


Creation 


Fund 


Year 


Div. 


Year 


Year 


Year 


Year 


Year 


8/15/47 


Atwood, D. $ 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


5/6/54 


Atwood, D.P. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


5/6/54 


Atwood, J. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


10/7/43 


Atwood, J.M. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


5/1/97 


Barker, S. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


8/29/56 


Barr, E. 


539.72 


4.72 


544.44 


31.67 


31.74 


31.67 


31.74 


3/14/49 


Bassett, F. 


539.72 


4.72 


544.44 


31.67 


31.74 


31.67 


31.74 


8/13/48 


Bassett, F. 


539.72 


4.72 


544.44 


31.67 


31.74 


31.67 


31.74 


5/30/19 


Batchelder, A 


134.93 


1.18 


136.11 


7.91 


7.93 


7.91 


7.93 


8/10/10 


Bayley, J. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


4/21/60 


Beauchesne, N. 


404.79 


3.54 


408.33 


23.80 


23.77 


23.80 


23.77 


7/29/39 


Berube, J. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


5/30/51 


Bigelow, B. 


404.79 


3.54 


408.33 


23.80 


23.77 


23.80 


23.77 


5/20/42 


Blodgett-E. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


9/9/00 


Boardman, C. 


134.93 


1.18 


136.11 


7.91 


7.93 


7.91 


7.93 


9/2/38 


Brown, H. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


12/10/26 


Bums, N. 


134.93 


1.18 


136.11 


7.91 


7.93 


7.91 


7.93 


9/1/59 


Burtt, M. 


539.72 


4.72 


544.44 


31.67 


31.74 


31.67 


31.74 


4/15/25 


Butler, A. 


134.93 


1.18 


136.11 


7.91 


7.93 


7.91 


7.93 


5/14/24 


Butler, D. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


7/31/56 


Butler, R. 


539.72 


4.72 


544.44 


31.67 


31.74 


31.67 


31.74 


5/29/39 


Butler, W. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


6/25/12 


Buttrick, I. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


5/25/24 


Carleton, A. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


6/6/38 


Carter, C. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


4/4/49 


Christian, S. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


8/31/28 


Clarke, J, 


539.72 


4.72 


544.44 


31.67 


31.74 


31.67 


31.74 


10/25/22 


Cloyd, A. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


7/23/18 


Cobum, G. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


1/27/08 


Cobum, J, 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


6/25/22 


Colburn, C, 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


1/10/57 


Colman, J, 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


9/5/46 


Cundall, A. L. 


539.72 


4.72 


544.44 


31.67 


31.74 


31.67 


31.74 


5/6/54 


Currier, H. M. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


5/3/19 


Cutter, A. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


10/25/22 


Cutter, C. 


539.72 


4.72 


544.44 


31.67 


31.74 


31.67 


31.74 


12/4/25 


Currer, F. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


6/1/37 


Day, B. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


3/15/29 


Doherty, J, 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


6/2/41 


Dutton, L.H, 


404.79 


3.54 


408.33 


23.80 


23.77 


23.80 


23.77 


5/23/28 


Foss-C. 


539.72 


4.72 


544.44 


31.67 


31.74 


31.67 


31.74 


6/30/56 


Foster, J, 


539.72 


4.72 


544.44 


31.67 


31.74 


31.67 


31.74 



62 







PRINCIPAL 






INCOME 






Date 


Name 


Bal. 


Capital 


Balance 


Bal. 


Income 


Spent 


Bal. 


of 


of 


Beg. 


Gain 


End 


Beg. 


During 


During 


End 


Creation 


Fund 


Year 


Div. 


Year 


Year 


Year 


Year 


Year 


6/3/35 


Fox, A.&C. $ 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.88215.87 


15.82 


15.87 


1/25/23 


Fox, D.&R. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


6/5/29 


Fox, D. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


1/8/47 


Fox, F. 


809.58 


7.04 


816.62 


47.51 


45.61 


47.51 


45.61 


6/5/39 


Fox, H, 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


2/5/53 


Fox, N. 


269.86 


2.36 


272,22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


6/3/57 


Freeman-W. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.89 


15.87 


^Pf^l 


Frost-S. 


134.93 


1.18 


136.11 


7.9i 


7.93 


7.91 


7.93 


2/15/15 


Gage, A. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 1 15.82 


15.87 


2/15/17 


Gage, A. 


404.79 


3.54 


408.33 


23.80 


23.77 


23.80 


23.77 


12/4/25 


Gage, D. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


12/5/08 


Gage, D.T. 


127.87 


1.12 


128.99 


7.80 


7.53 


7.80 


7.53 


10/15/12 


Gage, J. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


51.82 


15.87 


5/11/26 


Gage, J.B. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


4/15/25 


Gage, S. 


539.72 


4.72 


544.44 


31.67 


31.74 


31.67 


31.74 


6/3/35 


Geiimiell-C. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


1/4/15 


Gibson-M. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


2/15/05 


Gorrall, E. 


256.04 


2.24 


258.28 


15.00 


14.57 


15.00 


14.57 


2/28/18 


Gould, D. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


11.87 


15.82 


15.87 


5/8/49 


Greeley, A, 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


4/21/53 


Greeley, F. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


5/3/08 


Griffin, J. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


3/1/18 


Griffin Bros. 


134.93 


1.18 


136.11 


7.91 


7.93 


7.91 


7.93 


9/28/45 


Grondin, J, 


404.79 


3.54 


408.33 


23.80 


23.77 


23.80 


23.77 


1/4/26 


Hamblett, C. 


134.93 


1.18 


136.11 


7.91 


7.93 


7.91 


7.93 


12/8/47 


Hardy, C. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


7/15/11 


Harlow-R. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


11/21/41 


Harris, J. 


404.79 


3.54 


408.33 


23.80 


23.77 


23.80 


23.77 


1/3/18 


Harris, H. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


5/2/39 


Hennessey, L. 


134.93 


1.18 


166.11 


7.91 


7.93 


7.91 


7.93 


12/15/60 


Herbert, C. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


10/27/36 


Hillman, R, 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


7/18/31 


Hobbs-D. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


4/15/27 


Hobbs, J, 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


6/7/41 


Hobbs, S. 


539.72 


4.72 


544.44 


31.67 


31.74 


31.67 


31.74 


4/7/55 


Horskin, S. 


404.79 


3.5^ 


408.33 


23.80 


23.77 


23.80 


23.77 


7/30/37 


Hubley-S. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


9/21/41 


Hyde- P. 


134.93 


1.18 


136.11 


7.91 


7.93 


7.91 


7.93 


8/15/28 


Jackman, A. 


404.79 


3.54 


408.33 


23.80 


23.77 


23.80 


23.77 


11/2/38 


Jackman, N. 


134.93 


1.18 


136.11 


7.91 


7.93 


7.91 


7.93 


7/1/98 


Jackman, lo 


134.93 


1.18 


136.11 


7,91 


7.93 


7.91 


7.93 


10/15/41 


Johnson, I. 


404.79 


3.54 


408.33 


23.88 


23.77 


23.80 


23.77 


11/26/37 


Jones, M. 


134.93 


1.18 


136.11 


7.91 


7.93 


7.91 


7.93 


7/8/31 


Kelley, S. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


9/1/55 


Kelley, S. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


6/8/44 


Kent, C. 


201.88 


1.77 


203.65 


11.86 


11.67 


11.86 


11.67 


5/3/19 


Keyes, M. 


134.93 


1.18 


136.11 


7.91 


7.93 


7.91 


7.93 


10/5/44 


Kittredge, A. 


134.93 


1.18 


136.11 


7.91 


7.93 


7.91 


7.93 


8/8/47 


Lane, F. 


539.72 


4.72 


544.44 


31.67 


31.74 


3L .67 


31.74 



63 







PRINCIPAL 






INCOME 






Date 


Name 


Bal. 


Capital 


Balance 


Bal. 


Income 


Spent 


Bal. 


of 


of 


Beg. 


Gain 


End 


Beg. 


During 


During 


End 


Creation 


Fund 


Year 


Div. 


Year 


Year 


Year 


Year 


Year 


9/12/41 


Lewis, G, $ 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


10/25/32 


Lovell, C. 


134.93 


1.18 


136.11 


7.91 


7.93 


7.91 


7.93 


3/18/33 


Lyons , M, 


404.79 


3.54 


408.33 


23.80 


23.77 


23.80 


23.77 


4/15/24 


Marsh, E. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


11.87 


15.82 


15.87 


5/23/18 


Marsh, E. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


5/6/33 


Marsh, J. 


539.72 


4.72 


544.44 


31.67 


31.74 


31.67 


31.74 


2/5/09 


Marsh, M. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


7/1/08 


Marshall, D. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


1/15/lZ 


Marshall, I. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


12/3/59 


McCann, T. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


8/15/36 


McClure, M. 


539.72 


4.72 


544.44 


31.67 


31.74 


31.67 


31.74 


5/28/28 


Merrill, H. 


134.93 


1.18 


136.11 


7.91 


7.93 


7.91 


7.93 


5n/l(> 


Moore, E. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


8/15/24 


Moore, N. 


269.86 


S.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


8/15/24 


Moore, 0. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


8/22/55 


Muldoon, C.&G. 


539.72 


4.72 


544.44 


31.67 


31.74 


31.67 


31.73 


1/20/43 


Palmer, S. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


2/15/17 


Proctor, S. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


5/28/59 


Raymond, J.&M. 


269.86 


2,36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


8/15/15 


Richardson, B, 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


8/20/29 


Richardson, C. 


134.93 


1.18 


136.11 


7.91 


7.93 


7.91 


7.93 


10/18/46 


Richardson, E. 


404.79 


3.54 


408.33 


23.80 


23.77 


23.80 


23.77 


9/11/i^h 


Richardson, G. 


539.72 


4.72 


544.44 


31.67 


31.74 


31.67 


31.74 


2/6/30 


Richardson, 0. 


134.93 


1.18 


136.11 


7.91 


7.93 


7.91 


7.93 


7/23/31 


Richardson, J. 


539.72 


4.72 


544.44 


31.67 


31.74 


31.67 


31.74 


7/23/21 


Richardson, R. 


134.93 


1.18 


136.11 


7.91 


7.93 


7.91 


7.93 


6/23/21 


Richardson-H, 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


10/31/38 


Ross, H, 


404.79 


3.54 


408.33 


23.80 


23.77 


23.80 


23.77 


4/1/46 


Scott, C. 


404.79 


3.54 


408.33 


23.80 


23.77 


23.80 


23.77 


4/15/30 


Scruton, G. 


134.93 


1.18 


136.11 


7.91 


7.93 


7.91 


7.93 


5/3/49 


Seavey, C. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


8/3/98 


Seaman, E. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


2/5/07 


Shufelt, G. 


1349.30 


11.70 


1361.00 


79.17 


76.46 


79.17 


76.46 


2/15/09 


Shufelt, G. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


5/6/23 


Simpson, D. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


5/28/18 


Sleeper, I. 


134.93 


1.18 


136.11 


7.91 


7.93 


7.91 


7.93 


8/3/98 


Spear, B. 


404.79 


3.54 


408.33 


23.80 


23.77 


23.80 


23.77 


6/5/36 


Spear, C. 


539.72 


4.72 


544.44 


31.67 


31.74 


31.67 


31.74 


12/14/32 


Spear, E. 


134.93 


1.18 


136.11 


7.91 


7.93 


7.91 


7.93 


10/15/26 


Stickney, C. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


11/10/10 


Stickney-S. 


539.72 


4.72 


544.44 


31.67 


31.73 


31.67 


31.73 


8/15/38 


S towel 1, A. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


9/15/12 


Swan, E. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


1/30/36 


Tenney, C. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


7/7/43 


Tit comb, I. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.32 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


7/2/40 


Titcomb, J. 


404.79 


3.54 


408.33 


23.80 


23.77 


23.80 


23.77 


3/25/23 


Titcomb, W. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


8/15/12 


Tyler, M. 


269.86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 



64 



PRINCIPAL 



INCOME 



Date 


Name 


of 


of 


Creation 


Fund 



Bal. Capital Balance 
Beg, Gain End 
Year Div. Year 



Bal, Income Spent Bal, 
Beg, Euring During End 
Year Year Year Year 



8/15/12 


Tyler, J. 


269.86 


2,36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


6/1/17 


Wattj L, 


269,86 


2.36 


272/22 


15.82 


15,87 


15,82 


15.87 


6/15/36 


Webster, B, 


269,86 


2,36 


272,22 


15.82 


15,87 


15,82 


15.87 


4/15/30 


Webster, M, 


269,86 


2.36 


272,22 


15,82 


15,87 


15,82 


15.87 


1/14/15 


Wheeler, C, 


269,86 


2,36 


272,22 


15,82 


15,87 


15.82 


15.77 


9/9/22 


White, C, 


134.93 


1,18 


136,11 


7.91 


7,93 


7.91 


7.93 


1/17/22 


Wilson, J, 


269,86 


2,36 


272,22 


15,82 


15,87 


15.82 


15.87 


5/6/54 


Woodbury-E, 


269.86 


2,36 


272.22 


15,82 


15,87 


15.82 


15.87 


5/6/54 


Woodbury-M. 


539,72 


4,72 


544.44 


31.67 


31,74 


31.67 


31.74 


8/10/28 


Woodbury-H, 


269,86 


2,36 


272.22 


15.82 


15,87 


15.82 


15.87 


2/15/15 


Woodman, J, 


269,86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


5/13/13 


Wyman-T, 


269,86 


2.36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.82 


15.87 


5/23/19 


Young, E, _ 


269,86 


2,36 


272.22 


15.82 


15.87 


15.88 


15.87 



Total 



$ 47,001.71 410.91 47,403.62 2757.05 2757.74 2757.05 2757.7 



COMMON TRUST FUND "B' 



5/1/68 


Allard, D. 


241,10 


2.18 


243.28 


11.46 


9.72 


11.46 


9.72 


4/Z5/61 


Atwood, H, 


241.10 


2.18 


243.28 


11.46 


9.72 


11.46 


9.72 


3/19/63 


Burrows, E. 


120.55 


1.07 


121.62 


5.73 


4.86 


5.73 


4.86 


3/23/68 


Carleton, D, 


120.55 


1.07 


121.62 


5.73 


4.86 


5.73 


4.86 


11/17/69 


Carleton, S, 


120.55 


1.07 


121.62 


5.73 


4.86 


5.73 


4.86 


11/23/70 


Clark, J. 


100.00 


1.07 


101.07 




4.86 




4.86 


9/9/65 


Currier, R, 


120.55 


1.07 


121.62 


5.73 


4.86 


5.73 


4.86 


11/2/70 


Daigle, E, 


200.00 


2.18 


202.18 




9.72 




9.72 


4/1/63 


Dunn, R.&J. 


120.55 


1.07 


121.62 


5.73 


4.86 


5.73 


4.86 


4/25/62 


Garland, F, 


241.10 


2.18 


243.28 


11.46 


9.72 


11.46 


9.72 


11/21/61 


Goddard, C, 


120,55 


1.07 


121.62 


5.73 


4.86 


5.73 


4.86 


4/11/68 


Goodwin, E,&A, 


241,10 


2.18 


243,28 


11.46 


9.72 


11.46 


9.72 


4/4/69 


Goudreau, L. 


120,55 


1.07 


121,62 


5.73 


4.86 


5.73 


4.86 


3/4/63 


Greenwood, E, 


120,55 


1.07 


121.62 


5.73 


4.86 


5.73 


4.86 


3/1/66 


Harris, G. 


211,03 


1.87 


212.90 


9.95 


8.56 


9.95 


8.56 


6/15/64 


Healey, P. 


120,55 


1.07 


121.62 


5.73 


4.86 


5.73 


4.86 


12/30/63 


Herkomer, G. 


120,55 


1.07 


121.62 


5.73 


4.86 


5.73 


4.86 


9/24/68 


Hobbs, C. 


120,55 


1.07 


121.62 


5.73 


4.86 


5.73 


4.86 


9/1/66 


Hunt, C. 


120.55 


1.07 


121.52 


5.73 


4.86 


5.73 


4.86 


12/30/63 


Jarosky, A. 


120.55 


1.07 


121,62 


5.73 


4.86 


5.73 


4.86 


8/25/69 


Kennedy, H, 


120,55 


1.07 


121,52 


5.73 


4.86 


5.73 


4.86 


3/23/65 


Langworthy, H. 


120,55 


1.07 


121.52 


5.73 


4.86 


5.73 


4,86 


4/11/68 


McCann, B, 


241,10 


2.18 


243.28 


11.46 


9,72 


11.46 


9,72 


2/25/63 


Merrill, P.&B. 


241,10 


2.18 


243.28 


11.46 


9,72 


11.46 


9.72 


11/23/63 


Mills, E. 


241.10 


2.18 


243.28 


11.46 


9.72 


11.46 


9.72 



65 







PRINCIPAL 






INCOME 






Date 


Name 


Bal. 


Capital 


Balance 


Bal. 


Income 


Spent 


Bal. 


of 


of 


Beg. 


Gain 


End 


Beg, 


During During 


End 


Creation 


Fund 
Nickerson, L.$ 


Year 


Div. 


Year 


Year 
11.46 


Year 
9.72 


Year 
11.46 


Year 


3/25/63 


241.10 


2.18 


243.28 


9.42 


4/16/62 


Paquette, A, 


241.10 


2.18 


243.28 


11.46 


9.72 


11.46 


9.72 


5/1/68 


Patenaude, L. 


120.55 


1.07 


121.62 


5.73 


4.86 


5.73 


4.86 


10/25/64 


Quigley, J. 


180.88 


1.60 


182.48 


8.52 


7.34 


8.52 


7.34 


10/24/63 


Regan, J.&M. 


241.10 


2.18 


243.28 


5.73 


4.86 


5.73 


4.86 


3/23/68 


Richardson, R. 


120.55 


1.07 


121.62 


5.73 


4.86 


5.73 


4.86 


10/5/70 


Searles, C.&E. 


100.00 


1.07 


101.07 




4.86 


5.73 


4.86 


l/l/(>3 


Stott, T.&G. 


120.55 


1.07 


121.62 


5.73 


4.86 


5.73 


4.86 


6/2/64 


Sylvia, W. 


120.55 


1.07 


121.62 


5.73 


4.86 


5.73 


4.86 


11/15/68 


Tallant, A.&M. 


120.55 


1.07 


121.62 


5.73 


4.86 


5.73 


4.86 


9/1/63 


Whitman, J. 


120.55 


1.07 


121.62 


5.73 


4.86 


5.73 


4.86 


12/1/63 


Edwards, H. 


120.55 


1.07 


121.62 


5.73 


4.86 


5.73 


4.86 


7/16/71 


Momeau, F. 


100.00 


100.00 










7/16/71 


Wade, F.&C. 


100.00 


100.00 










7/16/71 


Nourse-Hill 
Wormald, J.&E. 


400.00 
100.00 


400.00 
100.00 










12/6/71 











Total 



$5855.01 753.12 6608.13 259.13 239.46 259.13 239.46 



LIBRARY COMMON TRUST 



4/4/60 
4/4/60 

Total 



Woodbury, F, 
Hobbs, S. 



6638.39 94.32 
6638.39 94.33 



6732.71 
6732.72 



268.36 284.76 293.46 259.66 
268.36 284.76 293.46 259.66 



$ 13,276.78 188.65 13,465.43 536.72 569.52 586.92 519.32 



NOT COMMON TRUST 

!)?!&?$# Currier, H. (Cem.)lOO.OO 
9/16/57 Koehler-Cahill (C)200.00 
10/2/53 Raymond, E.&A. (C) 225.00 
1940 Gage, M. (Lib.) 1000.00 
1922 Seavey, C. (Lib. ) 1000.00 
4/13/59 Capital Res. 

Fire Truck 12,709.42 4111.98 16,821.40 1337.02 718.37 
4/25/69 Capital Res. 

Safety Bldg. 40,000.00 40,000.00 1490.80 2162.60 3653.40 
4/18/59 Capital Res. 

Recreation 2,201.25 



100.00 


5.00 






5.00 


200.00 


19.61 11.23 






30.84 


225.00 


21.68 12.61 






34.29 


000.00 


50.20 






50.20 


000.00 


41.14 


41. 


,14 





2055.39 



2,201.25 312.52 128.59 441.11 



Total 

GRAND TOTAL 
ALL TRUSTS 



$ 57,435.67 4111.98 61,547.65 3181.63 3129.74 41.14 6270.23 



$ 123,569.17 5464.66 129,033.83 6734.53 6696.46 3644.24 9786.75 



66 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 
TAX COMMISSION 



February 7, 1972 



SUMMARY OF FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 



Board of Selectmen 
Pelham, New Hampshire 

Gentlemen: 

Submitted herewith is the report of the annual examination and audit of 
the accounts of the Town of Pelham for the fiscal year ended December 31, 1971, 
which was made ab this Division in accordance with the vote of the Town. 
Exhibits as hereafter listed are included as part of the report. 

One of these audit reports must be given to the Town Clerk for retention 
as part of the permanent Town records. 

SCOPE OF AUDIT 

Included in the examination and audit were the accounts and records of 
the Board of Selectmen, Treasurer, Tax Collector, Town Clerk, Cemetery 
Trustees, Public Library Trustees, Municipal Court and Trustees of Trust 
Funds. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 

General Fund: Comparative Balance Sheets - General Fund - as of December 31, 
1970 and December 31, 1971, are presented in Exhibit A-1. As indicated 
therein, the Surplus of the Town increased by >4,453.68 in 1971, from 
$21,135.63 to $25,589.31. 

Analysis of Change in Financial Condition: An analysis of change in current 
financial condition of the Town during the year is made in Exhibit A-2, with 
the factor which caused the change indicated therein. It was as follows: 
Increase in Current Surplus: Net Budget Surplus (Exhibit A-4) $4,453.68. 

Comparative statements of general fund appropriations and expenditures - 
estimated and actual revenues for the fiscal year ended December 31, 1971, are 
presented in Exhibits A-3 and A-4. As indicated by the Budget Summary, a 
revenue surplus of $26,201.05 less a net overdraft of appropriations of 
$21,747.37 resulted in a net budget surplus of $4,453.68, 



67 



A Balance Sheet of the Capital Projects Fund as of December 31, 1971, 
is contained in Exhibit A-5. 

A comparative statement of capital projects fund appropriations and 
expenditures is included in the above Exhibit, As indicated therein, unex- 
pended balances of these appropriations at December 31, 1971, amounted to 
$115,600.00, and consisted of (1) unexpended balances of Fire-Policee 
Station Construction Fund of $98,600.00, and (2) unexpended balance of Purchase 
of Fire Truck Fund of $17,000.00 

As indicated in Exhibit A- 7, the amount of outstanding long term in- 
debtedness at December 31, 1971, was $59,500.00, and consisted of long 
term notes of like amount, which were issued during 1971, in accordance 
with a vote of the Town. 

A statement of debt service requirements of the Town, showing annual 
maturities of principal and interest, is contained in Exhibit A-8. 

TREASURER 

A summary statement of general fund receipts and expenditures for the 
fiscal year ended December 31, 1971, made up in accordance with the uniform 
classification of accounts, is included in Exhibit B-1. Proof of the 
Treasurer's balance as of December 31, 1971, is indicated in Exhibit B-2. 

The books and records maintained by the Treasurer for the Fire-Police 
Station Building Fund and the Emergeftcy Employment Act Fund were examined. 
Receipts were checked by source and were traced to bank deposits. All checks 
cancelled during the year were compared with cash disbursement records. Bank 
balances as indicated by bank statements in the Treasurer's custody were re- 
conciled with book balances at the close of the fiscal year. Vouchers 
supporting payments made during the year were reviewed for propriety. 

The books and records of the Cemetery Trustees, Cemetery Lumber Fund, 
the Public Library, and the Municipal Court were examined during the course of 
the audit. Receipts were checked by source insofar as possible and were 
traced to bank deposits. All checks cancelled during the year were compared 
with cash disbursement records. Book balances at the close of the year were 
reconciled with bank balances shown by statements in the hands of the 
Tressurer. Vouchers supporting payments were reviewed for propriety. 

AUDIT PROCEDURE 

The accounts and records of all town officials charged with the custody, 
receipt and disbursement of public funds were examined and audited in accor- 
dance with generally accepted auditing standards, and accordingly included 
such tests of the accounting records and such other auditing procedures 
as were considered necessary in the circumstances. 

Verification of uncollected and unredeemed taxes was made by mailing 
notices to delinquent taxpayers as indicated by the Collector's records. The 
amounts of uncollected and unredeemed taxes as indicated in this report are 
therefore subject to any changes which may be necessitated by the return of 
verification notices. 



68 



GENERAL COMMENTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 

Inasmuch as the Town of Pelham has adopted the provisions of the Municipal 
Budget Law, the Selectmen are prohibited from making expenditures or incurring 
liabilities in excess of the total amount appropriated for all purposes by 
the Town meeting, or for purposes for which money has not been appropriated; 
provided, however, that when circumstances arise during the year which make 
it necessary to expend money in excess of town appropriations, or for purposes 
for which appropriations have not been made, the Selectmen upon application to 
the Tax Commission, may be given authority to make such expenditures. The 
granting of such authority is conditioned upon prior written approval by a 
majority of the Budget Committee, 

During 1971, budgetary expenditures subject to the provisions of the 
Municipal Budget Law resulted in a net overdraft of appropriations of 
$23,394.32, as indicated herewith: 

Total Overdrafts of Budetary Appropriations $32,713.60 
Total Unexpended Balances of Budetary Appropriations 9,319.28 

Net Overdraft of Appropriations Voted by Town $23,394.32 

As indicated in Exhibit A-3, because "Overlay" (Provision for Abatements 
and Refunds) is fixed by the Board of Selectmen, rather than voted by the Town 
meeting, expenditures for this purpose are not subject to the provisions of 
the Municiapl Budget Act and therefore, are not included in the computation 
of the net overdraft of appropriations shown above. 

In connection with this overdraft, the records of the Tax Commission 
indicate that a request by the Board of Selectmen to exceed 1971 town appro- i 
priations by $21,800.00 was duly approved by the Tax Commission on December 
30, 1971, pursuant to the provisions of Section 10-a, of the Municipal 
Budget Law (R.S.A. Chapter 32). 

As indicated previously, however, the actual net overdraft of appropriations 
in 1971 totaled $23,394,32. Consequently, unauthorized expenditures of 
$ 1,594.32 were incurred during the fiscal year. This resulted in a violation 
of Section 10 of the Municipal Budget Law. 

The purpose of the Municipal Budget Law is to control the appropriation 
and expenditure of money in municipalities. The law becomes ineffectual when 
its provisions are not adhered to. 

It should also be noted that Section 10-a of the Municipal Budget Law 
stipulates that "application shall be made prior to the making of such 
expenditures", except in the case of a sudden or unexpected emergency. 

Presented below is a schedule showing the amount of the net overdraft of 
budgetary appropriations for the past three years. 



69 



Fiscal Year Ended 



Net Overdraft 



December 31, 1969 
December 31, 1970 
December 31, 1971 



$13,416.76 
10,781.62 
23,394.32 



Expenditures for town highway maintenance and town poor appear to have 
been the major factors contributing to the overdrafts in those years. 
Perhaps appropriations for these purposes have not been adequate. It is 
suggested that requested appropriations for these functions in ensuing 
budgets be scrutinized very carefully to the end that allocations will be 
sufficient to meet the needs of the Town. 

As indicated in the statement of the Municipal Court account, there 
were unrecorded receipts of $77.66 in 1971. That is, that amount of money 
was deposited into the checking account maintained by the court, but was 
not recorded in the court records. In this regard, our examination revealed 
that the Clerk did not reconcile cash balances shown on the monthly bank 
statements with his records during the year. 

We have instructed the Clerk to record all monies received from fines, 
forfeitures, restitution, etc., as required, and to reconcile the amounts 
recorded to the bank statements on a monthly basis. In this way, discrepancies 
will be detected and corrected on a current basis. 

We were advised by the incumbent Treasurer of the Recreation Commission 
that there were no formal records of receipts and expenditures maintained in 
1971. We understand that this situation will be corrected in 1972. 

Your attention is directed to the provisions of R.S.A. 41:29 which 
stipulates that the treasurer of the town shall have custody of all moneys 
belonging to the town and shall pay out the same only upon orders of the 
selectmen All revenues derived from activities budgeted in the recreation 
commission budget should be paid to the Town Treasurer. 

The provisions of Chapter 71, Section 27-a, of the Revised Statutes 
Annotated, require that this report or the summary of findings and recommenda- 
tions (letter of transmittal) shall be published in the next annual report of 
the Town. 

We extend our thanks to the officials of the Town of Pelham for their 
assistance during the course of the audit. 

Yours very truly, 



THE COMPLETE AUDIT REPORT IS 
AVAILABLE FOR INSPECTION AT THE 
SELECTMEN'S OFFICE. 



Frederick E, Laplante, Director 
Division of Municipal Accountint 
STATE TAX COMMISSION 



70 



TOWN OF PELHAM 



THE STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



WARRANT 



1972 TOWN MEETING 



To the inhabitants of the Town of Pelham, in the County of Hillsborough 
and State of New Hampshire, qualified to vote in town affairs: 

You are hereby notified that the annual meeting of the Town of Pelham 
will be held at the Memorial School on Marsh Road in said Pelham on Tuesday, 
March 7, 1972 at 10:00 o'clock in the forenoon for the choice of town officers 
elected by an official ballot and other action required to be inserted on 
said official ballot. The polls for the election of town officers and other 
action required to be inserted on said ballot will open on said date at 10:00 
o'clock in the forenoon and will close not earlier than 8:00 o'clock in the 
evening. 

You are hereby notified that the second session of the annual meeting of 
the Town of Pelham will be held at the Memorial School on Marsh Road in said 
Pelham on Thursday, March 9, 1972 at 7:30 o'clock in the evening to act on the 
matters not to be voted upon by official ballot. 



1. To choose all necessary town officers f or , the year ensuing. (By ballot). 

2. To hear the reports of auditors, agents, and other committees heretofore 
chosen and pass any votes relating thereto. 

3. To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen and Town Treasurer 
to borrow, in anticipation of taxes, such sums as are necessary for the 
operation of the Town. 

4. To raise such sums of money as may be necessary to defray Town charges 
and expenses for the ensuing year and make appropriations for the same; that 
is, to see if the Town will vote to accept the Town Budget as prepared by 

the Budget Committee and take action thereon. (See budget detail). 



5. To see of the Town will vote to adopt a plan for extending to 
employees of the Town the benefits of Title II of the Federal Social Security 
(Old Age Survivors, Disability and Health Insurance) as authorized by Chapter 
101 of the Revised Statutes Annotated as amended, 

6. To see if the Town wishes to exclude from the plan services in any 
class or classes of positions filled by popular election. 

7. To see if the Town wishes to exclude from the plan services in any 
class or classes of positions the compensation for which is on a fee basis. 

8. To see if the Town wishes to exclude from the plan service in any class 
or classes of positions of election officials or election workers for a cal- 
endar quarter in which the remuneration paid for each service is less than $50.00,] 

9. If a plan for Social Security coverage is adopted, to see if the Town 
will authorize the selectmen to execute on behalf of the Town the necessary 
agreement with the State of New Hampshire to carry into effect the plan and 
to see if the Town will designate the selectmen as the officers to be res- 
ponsible for the administration of the plan. 

10, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$ 5,076.36 to defray the Town's share of costs for Social Security for the 
period April 1 - December 31, 1972. (Submitted by the Budget Committee 
without recommendation), 

11, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$ 399,00 for the purpose of purchasing a mimeograph printing machine for the 
use of all Town departments and offices, or take any other action relative 
thereto, (Approved by the Budget Committee), 

12, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$ 200.00 for the purpose of microfilming town records in accordance with the 
provisions of New Hampshire Revised Statutes Annotated, Chapter 33-A, as 
amended, and as voted at the 1971 annual Town Meeting, or take any other action 
relative thereto. (Approved by the Budget Committee), 

13, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$ 2,800.00 for the purpose of remodeling the Town Hall, or take any other action 
relative thereto. (Disapproved by the Budget Committee), 

14, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$ 1,000.00 for the purpose of purchasing office equipment for use in the 
Selectmen's office, or take any other action relative thereto. (Approved 
by the Budget Committee), 

15, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$ 1,700,00 for the purpose of completing maintenance projects in the Town 
Hall, or take any other action relative thereto. (Approved by the Budget 
Committee) , 

16, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$ 2,500,00 to secure an architect to design a new municipal building, (Ap- 
proved by the Budget Committee). 



17. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Tax Collector 
to appoint a Deputy Tax Collector as authorized by New Hampshire Revised 
Statutes Annotated, Chapter 41, Section 38. 

18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$ 1,294,70 for the purpose of bringing about the completion of the Soils 
Study Map for the Town of Pelham by the U.S. Soil Conservation Service under 
a matching grant program. (Approved by the Budget Comm8ttee), 

19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 

$ 12,000.00 to purchase twenty-six (26) acres of land, more or less, located 
east of Windham Road, from John and Leslie Preston. (Approved by the Budget 
Committee) . 

20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$ 2,500.00 to purchase five acres of land, more or less, located east of 
Windham Road, from Normand and Janyn Provencal. (Approved by the Budget 
Committee) . 

21. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the $ 6,000.00 raised 

at the 1971 annual Town Meeting for the purchase of land for the combination 
fire/police station building into the General Fund. 

22. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the expenditure of the sum 
of $ 3,000.00 from the unexpended proceeds and interest of the 1971 fire/police 
station note issue for the purpose of equipping and furnishing the new 
combination fire/police station building. (Approved by the Budget Committee). 
(A two- thirds vote is required to pass this article). 

23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 

$ 1,500.00 for the purpose of purchasing a police radar unit under a matching 
funds program administered by the New Hampshire Safety Agency. (Submitted 
by the Budget Committee without recommendation). 

24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 

$ 2,500.00 for the purpose of installing the necessary communications equip- 
ment in the new fire/police station building, under a matching funds program, 
or take any other action relative thereto. (Approved by the Budget Committee). 

25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 

$ 500.00 to be used as a contingency fund by the Town police department solely 
for the purpose of participating in Federal programs requiring local matching 
funds, or take any other action relative thereto. (Disapproved by the 
Budget Committee). 

26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$ 15,837.00 for the purpose of operating a full-time local police dispatch 
service under a matching fund program of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe 
Streets Act of 1968 (P.L, 90-351) as amended, or take any other action relative 
thereto. (Approved by the Budget Committee). 



27, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 

$ 6,050,00 for the purpose of purchasing capital equipment for use by the Town 
Fire Department, or take any other action relative thereto. (Approved by 
the Budget Committee). 

28, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 

$ 5,000,00 to add to the Capital Reserve Fund established for the purpose of 
purchasing a fire truck, or take any other action relative thereto. (Ap- 
proved by the Budget Committee). 

29, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 

$ 1,200.00 for the purpose of purchasing capital equipment for use by the Town 
Civil Defense Agency or take any other action relative thereto. (Approved 
by the Budget Committee). 

30, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$.25 per capita, or a total of $ 1,515.25 for support of the Nashua Regional 
Planning Agency, as authorized by New Hampshire Revised Statutes Annotated, 
Chapter 36, Section 49, (Approved by the Budget Committee), 

31, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$ 3,300,00 for the purpose of assisting the Greater Salem Mental Health 
Association as authorized by New Hampshire Revised Statutes Annotated, Chapter 
126-B, as amended, or take any other action relative thereto, (Approved by 
the Budget Committee), 

32, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$ 2,500,00 for the purpose of aiding the Merimack Valley Home Health Care 
Association as authorized by New Hampshire Revised Statutes Annotated, Chapter 
31, as amended, or take any other action relative thereto, (Approved by 

the Budget Committee), 

33, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$ 1,119,44 as the Town's share of Town Road Aid, the State to contribute 

$ 7,462,91 as the State's share as provided by law, (Approved by the Budget 
Committee) . 

34, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 

$ 3,200,00 for the purpose of purchasing a new snow plow, or take any other 
action relative thereto, (Submitted by the Budget Committee without recommenda- 
tion) , 

35, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 

$ 9,000,00 for the purpose of making necessary repairs to the Willow Street 
bridges, or take any other action relative thereto, (Approved by the Budget 
Committee), 

36, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 

$ 7,000.00 for the purpose of repairing, to the extent possible, town bridges 
according to state standards, or take any other action relative thereto. 
Disapproved by the Budget Committee), 

37, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 

$ 39,995,00, this sum to be partially reimbursed under a Federal program, for 
the purpose of renovating the Town library, or take any other action relative 
thereto, (Submitted by the Budget Committee without recommendation). 



38, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$ 3,286,00 for the purpose of completing the first phase of a three-phase 
renovation of the Town library, or take any other action relative thereto, 
(Approved by the Budget Committee), 

39, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 

$ 2,100,00 for the purpose of purchasing engineering office and field equip- 
ment for use by the Town Engineer, or take any other action relative thereto, 
(Approved by the Budget Committte), 

40, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 

$ 5,600,00 for the purpose of sponsoring and conducting programs and activ- 
ities for the teenagers of the Town, or take any other action relative thereto, 
(Approved by the Budget Committee), 

41, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 

$ 7,500,00 to be expended by the selectmen for the purposes of (1) conducting 
well tests; (2) making land surveys of well and reservoir sites; (3) making 
title searches of well and reservoir sites; (4) taking options on well and 
reservoir sites; (5) purchasing land for well and reservoir sites; (6) ob- 
taining engineering plans for a town water system; and (7) preparing and sub- 
mitting an application to the appropriate state and federal agencies for a 
town water system construction grant, (Approved by the Budget Committee), 

42, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 

$ 15,000,00 for the purposes of (1) preparing an accurate total valuation of 
all property belonging to Granite State Electric Company and New England 
Power Company within the Town; and (2) determining, through professional 
electrical engineering consultants, the feasibility of acquiring, through 
purchase, the Granite State Electric Company franchise and property in Town, 
(Approved by the Budget Committee), 

43, To see if the Town will vote to place the balance of the F972 
Fire Department appropriation in the Capital Reserve Fund established for 
the purpose of purchasing a fire truck, 

44, To take the sense of the qualified voters whether the amendments of 
the Constitution proposed by the 1971 session of the General Court shall be 
approved. (By ballot), 

45, To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to apply 
for, negotiate, and do all things necessary to obtain any Federal funds that 
are available, and to expend the same, 

46, To see if the Town will vote to sell a certain parcel of land 
located on Mammoth Road, containing approximately three acres for the sum 
of not less than $ 6,000,00, said land having been deeded to the Town in 
1965 by the Tax Collector as recorded in Volume 1819, page 179 in the Hills- 
borough County Registry of Deeds, and authorize the Selectmen to execute a 
deed conveying the Town's interest in said lot to the buyer. 



^7,' To see if the Town will vote to adopt the following ordinance, as 
provided in the Revised Statutes Annotated, Chapter 31, Section 41-b: 



HAZARDOUS PITS 



I. The removal of earth, including soil, fill, loam, sand, gravel, 
clay, stone, quarried rock and other sub-surface products, from land in the 
Town of Pelham, including new earth removal operations and/or the extention of 
existing earth removal operations, may be permitted upon grant of a license 

by the Board of Selectmen, 

II. No person shall engage in earth removal operations without a 
license from the Board of Selectmen. 

III. An application fee of twenty-five dollars ($ 25.00) shall 
accompany the application for license. 

IV. The Selectmen shall determine the form of the license and the 
requisite information to be submitted with the license. 

V. The Selectmen shall grant a license for earth removal operations 
only if they determine that the proposed earth removal operations will not 
affect the health and/or safety of the public, 

VI. In determining whether or not the health or safety of the public 
will be affected the Selectmen shall consider the following factors and such 
other factors as they consider relevant: 

(a) The location from which it is proposed to remove such 
earth; 

(b) The topography of such location; 

(c) The proximity of such location to highways, residential, 
commercial or industrial locations; and 

(d) The amount of noise, dust, and vibration that can be 
expected from such earth removal. 

VII. If the Board of Selectmen shall decide to grant a license for 
earth removal, it shall impose such reasonable restrictions and conditions 
on the exercise of the license as it deems to be in the public interest 
including but not being limited to the following: 

(a) The duration of time during which the license may be 
exercised; 

(b) The extent, depth and contour of the area of removal; 

(c) The grade of the slope of the banks of the area of 
removal; 



(d) The proximity of such removal to any public way and/or 
improved property, 

VIII, A bond or escrow agreement shall be required in an amount 
sufficient to provide recovering the area of removal with one of the following: 

(a) An area where loam has been removed shall be regraded 
with a minimum of two inches (2") of loam; seeded or 
hay-mulched, 

(b) Re-forested, 

(c) Hay- mulched, 

(d) Other appropriate action, 

IXX A license fee shall be charged by the Board of Selectmen predicated 
upon the length of time that the operations are to continue and the amount of 
earth to be removed. Such license fee shall be in an amount sufficient to 
reasonably reimburse the Town for its direct and indirect costs relative to 
the inspection and enforcement of this Ordinance with respect to the license in 
question, 

X, Each separate offense to this Ordinance shall be punishable by 
a fine not to exceed fifty dollars ($ 50,00), 

XI, This ordinance shall not apply to the removal of soil, losim, 
sand, gravel, clay, stone, quarried rock or other sub-surface products when 
indidental to and reasonably tequired in connection with the construction on 
the premises of any building for which a permit has been issued by the Building 
Inspector, 

XII, A, The Pelham Board of Adjustment shall be vested with the 
power by vote of a majority of its members, upon an appeal filed with it by 
any person aggrieved by a decision of the Selectmen under this ordinance to 
modify or reverse the Selectmen's decision, when in the Board's opinion, such 
decision would do manifest injustice and would be contrary to the spirit and 
purpose of this Ordinance, 

B, Any such appeal to the Board of Adjustment shall be taken 
within ten (10) days from receipt of notice of the Board of Selectmen's 
action on an application, 

XIII, The Board of Selectmen may appoint an administrative officer to 
make investigations in connection with the matters referred to in this or- 
dinance and to make recommendations thereon. Such administrative officer may 
also receive the applications referred to above, 

XIV, The invalidity of any section or provision of this Ordinance 
shall not invalidate any other section *or provision thereof, 

XV, This Ordinance shall become effective upon adoption. 



48. To see if the Town will vote to allow the Selectmen to abolish the 
current practice of mailing the annual town report to each R.F.D, Box Holder 
and Post Office Box Holder in the Town beginning with the 1972 annual town 
report, said annual town reports from 1972 forward to be available at the 
Town Hall, and at the annual Town Meeting, 

49. To see if the Town will vote to approve a minimum of three (3) 

hours pay to a police officer who is required to appear in the Pelham Municipal 
Court to offer testimony relative to a case pending before said court. (By 
petition of Albert J, Maki, James P. Stadmiller, Constance M. Edwards, 
Russell Leonard, Albert R, Cote, Louis E. Jacques, Richard L. Jacques, Timothy 
Zelonis, Joseph H, Stevens and William A, Melanson). 

50* To see if the Town will vote to allow the International Brotherhood 
of Police Officers to act as bargaining agents for the police officers of the 
Town of Pelham, New Hampshire. (By petition of Albert J. Maki, James P. 
Stadtmiller, Constance M. Edwards, Albert R. Cote, Louis E. Jacques, Richard 
L. Jacques, Timothy Zelonis, Joseph H. Stevens, Richard S. Melanson, and 
Charles L. Therriault), 

"il. Are you in favor of adoption of a five-member board of selectmen to 
administer the affairs of the Town, beginning with the 1973 annual Town Meeting, 
as provided in New Hampsliire Revised Statutes Annotated, Chapter 41, as 
amended? (By ballot). 

52- A petition by voters of the Town of Pelham to amend the existing 
zoning ordinance for the Town of Pelham, New Hampshire as follows: 

"To add onto Article lA Section b. at the end thereof the words 
"From a point at the corner of Jericho Road on the Easterly side of and at 
Bridge Street (Route 38) along said Bridge Street (Route 38) to Highland 
Avenue thence in an easterly direction along Highland Avenue Two Hundred 
feet (200 ft.) thence in a southerly direction back to Jericho Road along a 
line parallel with Bridge Street (Route 38). Thence in a Westerly direction 
Two Hundred feet (200 ft.) along Jericho Road to the point of beginning." 
(Bv petition of Robert S. Edwards, Edward L. Potter, Walter H. Wood, Stanley 
Neskey, Theresa M. Neskey, Paul Fisher Jr., John Maiocchi, Rajmiond T. Wil- 
kins, Dorothea M. Wilkins, Edward P. Boyd, Patricia Boyd, Norman H. Carpen- 
tier, Dora A. Carpentier, Richard E. Cumming, Ruth Cumming, William J. 
Azimopoulos, Helen Azimopolous, Edward W. Kiluk, Irene D. Kiluk, Judith A. 
Boutwell, Alfred C. Ilg, Robert A, Blanchette, Leonard Philbrick, Charles 
Therriault, Payson A. Goodwin Jr., Leo M. Rush, Richard J. Pendergast, 
Doris I« Pendergast, James H. Pendergast, Albert J. Cote, Albert R. Cote, 
Thomas Provencal, Nathan C. Boutwell, Robert M. Edwards, Diane F. Hayes, 
James P. Stadtmiller, Ann R. Stadtmiller, James P. Stadtmiller Jr., Frederic 
W. Grant, Robert T. Horgan, Maurice D. Bisson, Edmond Bisson, Daniel E. 
Harvey, Robert L. Harvey Jr., Patricia A. Hartwell, Harold W. Hartwell, 
Henry J. Seamans Jr., George M. Neskey, Normand Albert, Leonard J. McGee, 
Carole A. McGee, Walter E. Kaczynski, Raymond A. Roussell, Mae E. Stevens, 
Joseph H. Stevens, Rita St. Onge, Elizabeth J. Gendron, Judith A. Wojcik, 
Frederick Gendron, Robert Lafontaine, Phyllis Lafontaine, Wilbrod Gendron, 
Sandra M. Campbell, George W. Harris Jr., Betsy C. Harris, Gladys L. Hayes, 
Robert D. Pendergast, Titus Plomaritis, Claire A. Plomaritis, Norman D. 
Paquette, Femand P. Marcoux, James A. Rowntree, Maureen Rowntree), (By ballot) 



8 



53. A petition by voters of the Town of Pelham for an article in the 1972 
Town Meeting Warrant as provided by RSA 36:19a: 

"To see if the Town will vote to empower the Planning Board to review, 
and approve or disapprove site plans for the development of tracts for non- 
residential uses." (By petition of Marianne H. Thompson, Churchill G. Rood, 
Dow L Case, Sara S. Reynolds, John C, Lavallee, Mary E, Lavallee, Richard L. 
Sampson, Gisele R, Sampson, Antoinette S. Chapman, Mauro A. Accomazzo, 
Janet L. Accomazzo, Richard D, Craven, Roger R, Stork, Sandra J. Stork, 
Larry N, Ormsby, James J. White, Donald E, Brock, Philip J, Labranch, Cornelius 
F. Ives, Anne S. Hince, Sandra M. Corbin, June A, Groele, Gertrude C. Tuttle, 
Elaine Hombeck, Suzanne J. Rood, Joanne L. Hamblett, Caren D. Estey, Ann 
S. Hales, Nellie N. Leavy). (By ballot). 

54, A petition by voters of the Town of Pelham for an article in the 
1972 Town Meeting Warrant as provided by RSA 31:63b: 

"To amend Article lA Districts by adding after Section d. a new 
section e., as follows: 

e. The low density residential district shall consist of the following 
areas: 

Beginning at a point on the Massachusetts-New Hampshire state line, 
said point being five hundred (500) feet west of the west line of Mammoth 
Road (New Hampshire Route 128) thence northerly along a line at a distance of 
five hundred (500) feet from and parallel to said Mammoth Road to the south 
line of Gumpas Pond Road, thence easterly along the south line of Gumpas Pond 
Road to the west line of Mammoth Road, thence northerly along the west line 
of Mammoth Road to the Pelham- Windham town line, thence westerly along the 
Pelham- Windham town line to the Pelham-Hudson town line, thence southerly along 
the Pelham-Hudson town line to the Massachusetts-New Hampshire state line 
thence easterly along said state line to the point of beginning. 

Beginning at a point on the Pelham-Salem town line one 
thousand (1000) feet easterly along said town line from the east line of Gage 
Hill Road (New Hampshire Route 38) said point being the easterly comer of the 
industrial district, thence southerly along said industrial district to the 
east line of Youngs Crossing Road, thence southerly and westerly along a 
line parallel to and at a distance of one thousand (1000) feet from said 
Gage Hill Road to the westerly line of Old Lawrence Road, thence southerly 
along the westerly line of Old Lawrence Road to a point three thousand five 
hundred (3500) feet east of the east line of Bridge Street (New Hampshire Route 
38) thence southerly along a line parallel to and at a distance of three thou- 
sand five hundred (3500) feet from said Bridge Street to the New Hampshire- 
Massachusetts state line, thence easterly and northerly along said state 
line to the Pelham-Salem town line, thence northerly and westerly along 
said town line to the point of beginning." (By petition of Marianne H. 
Thompson, Churchill G. Rood, Dow L. Case, Sara S. Reynolds, John C. Lavallee, 
Mary E. Lavallee, Richard L. Sampson, Gisele R. Sampson, Antoinette S, 
Chapman, Sandra M. Corbin, Mauro C. Accomazzo, Richard D. Craven, Roger S, 
Stork, Sandra J. Stork, Larry N. Ormsby, James J. White, Donald E. Brock, 
Philip J. Labranch, Cornelius F. Ives, Anne S, Hince, June A. Groele, Gertrude 
C. Tuttle, Suzanne J, Rood, Joanne L, Hamblett, Caren D. Estey, Ann S, Hales, 
Nellie M. Leavy). (By ballot). 



9 



55. A petition by voters of the Town of Pelham, New Hampshire, for an 
article in the 1972 Town Meeting Warrant as provided by RSA 31:63b: 

a) "To amend Article II by adding after paragraph 10 three new 
paragraphs, as follows: 

11, Height of a building means the vertical distance from grade 
to the average elevation of the roof of the highest story. 

12, Side yard setback means the distance from the extreme side 
of any building to the nearest point on any side lot line. 

13, Rear yard setback means the distance from the extreme rear 
of any building to the nearest point on any rear lot line." 

b) "To amend Article III paragraph 1 by striking out said paragraph 
1 and substituting in its place the following: 

1, Set back. There shall be between the nearest right-of-way 
and the extreme front of a single or two-family dwelling a yard having a 
minimum depth of thirty (30) feet; for single or two family dwellings there 
shall be provided a side yard of not less than fifteen feet. There shall be 
between the nearest right-of-way and the extreme front of any multi-residential, 
commercial, or industrial building a distance equal to not less than two and 
one- half (2-h) times the height of the building, but not less than forty 

(40) feet. For multi-residential, commercial, or industrial buildings there 
shall be provided side yerd and rear yard setbacks of not less than two (2) 
times the height of the building, but not less than thirty (30) feet," 

c) "To amend Article III paragraph 2 to read as follows: 

2, Frontage, No lot shall have less than two hundred (200) 
feet of frontage. No lot for the use of a multiple dwelling shall have less 
than two hundred (200) feet of frontage; not less than fifty (50) feet of 
additional frontage shall be provided for each family unit in excess of four," 

d) "To amend Article III paragraph 3, as amended September 18, 
1964, by striking out said paragraph 3 and substituting in its place the fol- 
lowing : 

3, Minimum land area, 

a. No lot for the use of a one family dwelling shall be 
less than one (1) acre in size, except that in the low density residential 
district no lot for use of a single family dwelling shall be less than two 
(2) acres in size. 

b. No lot for the use of a two family dwelling, commer- 
cial, or industrial building shall be less than two (2) acres in size, 

c. No lot for the use of a three or four family unit 
multiple dwelling shall be less than three (3) acres in size. Not less than 
one-half (^) acre of additional lot size shall be provided for each family 
unit in excess of four," 

e) "To amend Article IIIB paragraph 2 by striking out said para- 
graph 2, and inserting in its place the following: 

2, Lodging houses, apartment houses not to exceed twelve (12) 
family units, hotels, motels, tourist cabins or courts, including such retail 
business within these permitted buildings as are conducted for the convenience 
of residents or guests," 



10 



f) ^'To amend Article IIIB paragraph 7 by adding after said para- 
graph 7 the following: 

For multi-residential buildings there shall be provided not less 
than one and one-half (l-h) all-weather parking spaces per family unit. For 
commercial buildings there shall be provided not less than one (1) all-weather 
parking space for each one hundred fifty (150) square feet of building space 
devoted to customer service. (By petition of Marianne H. Thompson, Churchill 
G. Rood, Dow L. Case, Sara S. Re3molds, John C. Lavallee, Mary E. Lavallee, 
Richard L, Sampson, Antoinette S, Chapman, Mauro C, Accomazzo, Janet L. 
Accomazzo, Richard D. Craven, Roger R, Stock, Sandra J. Stork, Larry N, 
Ormsby, James J. White, Donald Brock, Philip J, Labrance, Cornelius F, Ives, 
Anne S, Hince, Sandra M. Corbin, June A. Groele, Gertrude C, Tuttle, Suzanne 
J. Rood, Joanne L, Hamblett, Caren D, Estey). (By ballot). 

56. A petition by voters of the Town of Pelham, New Hampshire for an 
article in the 1972 Town Meeting Warrant as provided by RSA 31:63b. 

"Every person, persons, firm or corporation violating any of the 
provisions of this Ordinance shall be fined not more than fifty (50) dollars 
upon conviction for each day such violation may exist." (By pptition of 
Marianne H. Thompson, Churchill G. Rood, Dow L. Case, Sara S. Reynolds, 
John C. Lavallee, Mary E. Lavallee, Richard L. Sampson, Gisele R. Sampson, 
Antoinette S. Chapman, Mauro C, Accomazzo, Janet L. Accomazzo, Richard D, 
Craven, Roger R. Stork, Sandra J. Stork, Larry N. Ormsby, James J. White, 
Donald E. Brock, Philip Labranch, Cornelius F. Ives, Anne S. Hince, Sandra 
M. Corbin, June A, Groele, Gertrude C. Tuttle, Elaine Hombeck, Suzanne J, 
Rood, Joanne L. Hamblett, Caren D. Estey, Ann S. Hales, Nellie N. Leavy). 
(By ballot). 

57, To see if the Town will vote to adopt the following Building Code: 

Section 1, 

There is hereby adopted by the Town of Pelham, New Hampshire for the 
purpose of establishing rules and regulations for the construction, alteration, 
removal, demolition, equipment, use and occupancy, location and maintenance of 
buildings and structures, including permits and penalties, that certain building 
code known as the National Building Code recommended by the American Insurance 
Association, successors to the National Board of Fire Underwriters, being 
particularly the 1967 edition thereof and the whole thereof, save and except 
such portions as are hereinafter deleted, modified or amended, of which not 
less than three (3) copies have been and now are filed in the office of the 
Town Clerk, three copies (3) in the office of the Board of Selectmen and three 
(3) in the office of the Building Inspector, and the same are hereby adopted 
and incorporated as fully as if set out at length herein, and from the date on 
which this ordinance shall take effect, the provisions thereof shall be con- 
trolling in the construction of all buildings and structures therein contained 
within the corporate limits of the Town of Pelham. 

Section 2. ESTABLISHMENT OF OFFICE OF BUILDING INSPECTOR 

(a) The office of Building Inspector is hereby created and the executive 
official in charge shall be known as the Building Inspector, 



11 



(b) The building inspector shall be appointed by the Board of 
Selectmen. His appointment shall continue during good behavior and satis- 
factory service. He shall not be removed from office except for cause after 
full opportunity has been given him to be heard on specific charges. 

(c) The Board of Selectmen may also appoint assistant inspectors whose tenure 
shall be subject to the same terms and oonditions as set forth above for the 
Building Inspector. 

Section 3. QUALIFICATIONS OF BUILDING INSPECTOR 

To be eligible to appointment to the positions created in Section 
2, the candidate shall have had experience as an architect, structural 
engineer, builder, building inspector or superintendent of building construc- 
tion. He shall be in good health, physically capable of making the neces- 
sary examinations and inspections. He shall not have any interest whatever, 
directly or indirectly, in the sale or manufacture of any material, process 
or device entering into or used in or in connection with building, construc- 
tion, alterations, removal or demolition. 

Section 4. DUTIES OF BUILDING INSPECTOR 

(a) The Building Inspector shall be available during the normal 
business day to attend to the duties of his office. He shall receive ap- 
plications required by this code, issue permits and furnish the prescribed 
certificates. He shall examine premises for which permits have been issued 
and shall make necessary inspections to see that the provisions of law are 
complied with and that construction is prosecuted safely. He shall enforce all 
provisions of the building code. He shall, when requested by proper authority, 
or when the public interest so requires, make investigations in connection 
with matters referred to in the building code and render written reports on 
the same. To enforce compliance with law, to remove illegal or unsafe con- 
ditions to secure the necessary safeguards during construction, or to require 
adequate exit facilities in buildings and structures, he shall issue such 
notices or orders as may be necessary. 

(b) Inspections required under the provisions of the building code 
shall be made by the Building Inspector or his duly appointed assistant. 
The Building Inspector may accept reports of inspectors of recognized in- 
spection services, after investigation of their qualifications and relia- 
bility. No certificate called for by any provision of the building code 
shall be issued on such reports unless the same are in writing and certified 
to by a responsible officer of such service. 

(c) The Building Inspector shall keep comprehensive records of 
applications, of permits issued, of certificates issued, of inspections made, 
of reports rendered, and of notices or orders issued. He shall retain on 
file copies of required plans and all documents relating to building work 

so long as any part of the building or structure to which they relate may 
be in existence, 

(d) All such records shall be open to public inspection for good 
and sufficient reasons at the stated office hours, but shall not be removed 
from the office of the Building Inspector without his wriiten consent. 



12 



(e) The Building Inspector shall make written reports to the Board 
of Selectmen once each week, or oftener if requested, including statements 
of permits and certificates issued, and orders promulgated. 

Section 5. LIABILITY OF BUILDING INSPECTOR 

The Building Inspector or any employee charged with the enforcement 
of this Code, acting in good faith and without malice for the town in the 
discharge of his duties, shall not thereby render himself liable personally 
and he is hereby relieved from all personal liability for any damage that may 
accrue to persons or property as a result of any act required or by reason 
of any act or omission in the discharge of his duties. Any suit brought 
against the Building Inspector or employee, because of such act or omission 
performed by him in the enforcement of any provisions of this code, shall be 
defended by corporation counsel of the town until final termination of the 
proceedings. 

Section 6. COOPERATION OF OTHER OFFICIALS 

The Building Inspector may request and shall receive so far as may 
be necessary, in the discharge of his duties, the assistance and cooperation 
of other officials of the municipality. 

Section 7. DEFINITIONS 

(a) Wherever the word "Municipality" is used in the building code, 
it shall be held to mean the Town of Pelham. s 

(b) Wherever the term "Corporation Counsel" is used in the building 
code, it shall be held to mean the attorney for the Town of Pelham. Jtivr 

■ o -> **< ^ -x J. ^it- ^i ^ J 
Section 8. FEES 

(a) No permit as required by the Building Code shall be issued until 
the fee prescribed in this ordinance shall have been paid. Nor shall an amend- 
ment to a permit be approved until the additional fee, if any, due to an 
increase in the estimated cost of the building or structure, shall have been 
paid. 

(b) For a permit for the construction or alteration of a building 
or structure, the fee shall be at the rate of $ 3,00 per thousand dollars of 
the estimated cost up to $ 15,000.00 (Fifteen thousand dollars), plus $ 2.00 
per thousand dollars of the estimated cost in excess of $ 15,000.00 (Fifteen 
thousand dollars); but not less than $ 15.00 n any case; provided that no 
fee shall be required when the estimated cost does not exceed $ 100.00 

(One hundred dollars). 

(c) For a permit for the removal of a building or structure from 

one lot to another, the fee shall be at the rate of $ 3.00 per thousand dollars 
of the estimated value of the building or structure in its completed condition 
after removal. 

(d) For a permit for the removal of a building or structure to a 



13 



to a new location within the same lot, the fee shall be at the rate of $ 3,00 
per thousand dollars of the estimated cost of moving of new foundations and of 
work necessary to put the building or structure in usable condition in its 
new location. 

(e) For a permit for the demolition of a building or structure 
the fee shall be ? 15.00 (Fifteen dollars). 

(f) In case of abandonment or discontinuance, the cost of work per- 
formed under a permit may be estimated, an adjustment of the fee made and 
the portion of the fee for uncompleted work returned to the permit holder, 
provided that no refund of a prescribed minimum fee shall be made. If such 
discontinuance is due to revocation of permit, a similar adjustment and return 
may be made; provided that no refund shall be made until all penalties 
incurred or imposed by due authority have been collected. After such a 
refund has been made no work shall be resumed until a new application has 
been made and a new permit has been issued. 

(g) The term "estimated cost" as used in this section, means the 
reasonable value of all services, labor, materials, and use of scaffolding 

and other applicances or devices entering into and necessary to the prosecution 
and completion of the work ready for occupancy; provided that the cost of 
excavation or grading, and of painting, decorating or other work that is 
merely for embellishment or not necessary for the safe and lawful use of the 
building or structure, is not deemed a part of such estimated cost. 

Section 9. SAVING CLAUSE 

Nothing in this ordinance or in the building code hereby adopted 
shall be construed to affect any suit or proceeding now pending in any court, 
or any rights acnuirea, or liability incurred, nor any cause or causes of 
action accrued or existing, under any act or ordinance repealed hereby. 
Nor shall any right or remedy of any character be lost, impaired or affected 
by this ordinance. i J 

Section 10. VALIDITY j 

The invalidity of any section or provision of this ordinance or 
of the building code hereby adopted shall not invalidate other sections or f 
provisions thereof. 

Section 11. INCONSISTENT ORDINANCES REPEALED 

Ordinances or parts thereof in force at the time that this cordinance 
shall take effect and inconsistent herewith, are hereby repealed as of the 
date of the effect of this ordinance. 

Section 12. AMENDMENTS MADE IN SAID CODE 

Said code is amended and changed in the following respects: 



14 



(A) Section 102.16 is amended to read as follows: 
"102.16. Expiration of permit. 

(a) A .permit under which no work is commenced within 90 (ninety) 
days after issuance shall expire by limitation and a new permit shall be 
secured before work is started. 

(b) Any building or construction authorized by the issuance of a 
permit must be completed, as authorizee by the permit, within one year from 
the date of issuance of the permit. A new permit shall be secured if the 
work as authorized is not completed within the one year period. 

(B) Section 106.1 is amended as follows: 

The last sentence of Section 106.1 is deleted and the following 
sentences inserted in place thereof: 

"Each such person shall be deemed guilty of a separate offense for 
each and every day or portion thereof during which any violation of any pro- 
vision of this code is committeedor continued and upon conviction of such" 
violation each such person shall be punished by a fine of not more than 
Fifty Dollars ($ 50.00) for each separate offense. In addition, the Building 
Inspector shall, upon written receipt from the Board of Selectmen of a stop- 
work order issued to a builder of a structure in an approved subdivision, 
suspend all building permits issued to that same builder for construction in 
that same dubdivision, until the Building Inspector can determine whether the 
above-mentioned builder has committeedsimilar violations on any other struc- 
tures in the above mentioned subdivision. This determination on the part of 
the Building Inspector shall require no longer than forty-eight (48) hours 
from receipt by hom of the stop-work order." 

(C) Section 107, BOARD OF APPEAL is deleted and the following inserted 
in place thereof: 

"Section 107. BOARD OF APPEAL 

The Pelham Board of Adjustment shall be vested with the power of 
granting variances to any person aggrieved by a decision of the Building 
Inspector's office, or to vary the application of any of the provisions of 
this Code upon such terms and conditions as the Board of Adjustment grants 
variances under the Pelham zoning ordinances." 

(D) Section 400. RESTRICTIONS ON CONSTRUCTION WITHIN THE FIRE 
LIMITS is hereby deleted in its entirety. 

(E) Section 401. HEIGHT AND AREA RESTRICTIONS is hereby deleted in 
its entirety. 

(F) The following Articles and Appendixes are deleted in their 
entirety: 



15 



,~.A. ;:. 



ARTICLE XV. Electrical installations. 



APPENDIX J, Earthquake Resisting Construction. 



APPENDIX Q. 



Section 13. DATE OF EFFECT. 

This ordinance shall take effect upon adoption. (By petition of 
Churchill G. Rood, Dow L. Case, Sara S. Reynolds, John C. Lavallee, Mary E, 
Lavallee, Richard L. Sampson, Gisele R. Sampson, Antoinette S. Chapman, 
Mauro C. Accomazzo, Janet L. Accomazzo, Richard D. Craven, Sandra J. Stork, 
Roger R, Stork, Larry N. Ormsby, Marianne H, Thompson, James J. White, 
Donald E. Brock, Cornelius F. Ives, Philip J. Labranch, Anne S. Hince, 
Sandra M, Corbin, June A, Groele, Gertrude C. Tuttle, Elaine Hombeck, 
Suzanne J. Rood, Joanne L. Hamblett, Caren D, Estey, Ann S. Hales, Nellie 
N. Leavy). (By ballot). 



Given under our hands and seals this eighteenth day of February, in the 
year of our Lord Nineteen Hundred and Seventy- Two. 




Melvin R. Strawbridge 





'^i^Z^^^e^e.^ 



John C. Lavallee 




James P. Emerson 



SELECTMEN OF 

PELHAM, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



16 



A true copy of Warrant - Attest: 





auJ'f^ 




^ 



Melvin Rr Strawbridge 





ax^aJX^^-ji-^ 



John C. Laval lee 




James P. Emerson 



SELECTMEN OF 

PELHAM, NEW AHMPSHIRE 



17 




en Pi 




PQ pd 



CO 




C 




<u 


4J 


g 


W 


4J 


<U CNI 


o 


3 1^ 


<D 


croN 


-4 


(U .-1 


0) 
C/D 


orf 



1-:) 


•o 






M 


<u 






<J 


TJ 






H 


C 




i-< 


u 


(U 




r- 


Q 


CX 




0^ 




X 




•-I 


H 


w 






M 
















Q 








^ 








P3 


1 

•H 






es 


)-i 






r>- 


O. 






o 


o 


c 




1-1 


u 


o 


.-1 




a, 


•H 


r^ 




cu •»-> 


ON 




<: 


CO 


I— 1 



</> 



o o 
o o 

• • 

o o 
o o 

ON 00 



o o o o 

o o o o 

• • • • 

o o o o 

o o o o 

00 lO CO 00 

CNJ 



■co- 



o o 
o o 

• • 

o o 
o o 

ON 00 



o o o o 
o o o o 

• • • • 

o o o o 
o o o o 
00 m CO 00 



■</> 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 



vO 



<o- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 



vO 



<o- 



o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


o 


o 


in 


in 


o 


o 


m 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


I^ 


o 


in 


00 


o 


CM 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


00 


00 




in 


I-l 


eg 


\D 


m 


m 



o 
o 


o 
o 




CO 

00 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


csi 

ON 


o 
o 


in 

f-i 


m 


in 

CM 


o 

CO 


m 
1—1 


CM 


o 
o 

00 


o 
o 


1— 1 

ON 

CM 


o 

CM 

CO 


o 
o 

CM 

«^ 
1-1 


o 
o 

CO 


o 
o 


CM 


o 
o 






ON 

o 

CM 


CsJ 




ON 

CO 
CM 

ON 


•CO- 




























•CO- 



o o 

o o 

• • 

o o 

o o 

ON 00 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 



o o 

o o 

• • 

o o 

o o 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 



00 m CO 00 



Csl 



</> 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 



vO 



</> 



m 1-1 f-i CM 



</> 



ooooooooo o 

ooooooooo o 

• •••••••• • 

oommmomoo o 

cor^oinr^ocMoo o 

cooooo vDi— icMvoin m 

m 1-1 t-i CM 



<n- 



oooo<fONvo<fr>»>d-«* 
oooNvomocoocooNCM 

Oi-linOCMCMcOCMOOONCO 
^^ONi-lOOO-CtONOOOOOON 

O'^ooiHin i-icMco vo 

m •-< r-t CM 



■CO- 

ooooooo-d-o o 

OOOOOOOCJNO o 

• •••••••• • 

oovoomomr^o o 

vDO0Nor»or^r--O O 

ommi-^^i-icMCMcM r-t 

m 1-1 1-1 CM 



■CO- 



CO 


























CO 






4J 

i 












u 










o 












1-1 




M 






•H 




(0 








M 










I^ 












1^ 




£5 






3 




-o 








1^ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


ON 




t-) 


l-< 


r-4 


1-1 


C3N 




5Z 






cr 




•H to 








< 


r^ 


r-- 


r^ 


r-- 


r-\ O 




r^ 


r^ 


1^ 


t^ 


1-) r-\ 




W 




(U 


<u 




PQ <U 


CO 






hJ 


o 


ON 


ON 


o 


I^ 


O 


ON 


ON 


C3N 


CJN 


r^ 


1-1 


EU 




o 






bO 


(U 






<: 


1-1 


1-1 


1—1 


1-1 


•\ On 


r-- 


t-1 


1-1 


1-1 


r-\ 


•k ON 


1^ 


X 




•H 


(U 




^ CO 


3 






CO 










H 1-1 


c:^ 










}-l 1-4 


ON 


U 




«4-4 


o 




(0 bO O 




J-) 




1-1 


CM 


CO 


CO 


O 


1-1 


I— 1 


CM 


CM 


CO 


O 


1-4 






<+H 


•H 




CU -M 






Hi 


CO 


=»= 


=st= 


=st= 


=S= 


u ^ 




=t!= 


=«= 


=*: 


=ss= 


4J «. 




CO 


Cu 


O 


4-1 




O M 


C 




(U 4-> 


cc; 










o ^ 


A 










O ^ 


«k 


Pi 


1-1 




»4-4 




•H O 


O 




6 !-• 


w 


a 


C 


c 


C 


a> >.( 


u 


C 


c 


P! 


c 


CU M 


u 


M 


fc-:S 


•k 


O 


cu 


•u S 


•H 




Cu O 


CJ 


<u 


cu 


0) 


<u 


1-1 dj 


(U 


(U 


QJ 


(U 


(U 


1-1 0) 


(U 


CJ 


CO 







o 


J-> 




•H ex 


M 


s 


g 


s 


g 


i-t 1-4 


n 


6 


6 


s 


a 


1-1 1-1 


!-i 


M 


CO 


cu 


^ 


o 


c c^ej 


CO 




p <u 


fa 


+j 


Jj 


is 


4J 


O CJ 


3 


5 


.0 


4J 


ij 


O CJ 


3 


fa 


+j a» 


•H 


!-i 


.jC 




•H 




crpi 


fa 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


u 


w 


fa 


o o 


1-1 


•H 


04 


1-1 CO 


O 


j-> 


u 


o 


0) 


0) 


(U 


Q> 




CO 


<u 


<u 


(U 


(U 




CO 


O 


l-l -H 


a 


CO 


(U 


CO -O 


o 


•H 


cj 




1-4 


l-< 


1-1 


1-1 


X i 


(U 


1-1 


1-1 


rH 


1-1 


X § 


(U 




O 14-1 


CX4 


Cu 1—1 


60 <U 


CO 


■TJ 


15 5 


^z. 


0) 


(U 


<u 


<U 


CO o 


M 


(U 


o 


0) 


(U 


CO O 


^■4 


21 


(U «4-l 


3 


a> 


<u 


<U" CU 


CO 


P 


cu o 


^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


H H 


E-" 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


H H 


H 


^ 


CO o 


CO 


Pd 


H 


hJ p 


<: <: 


Z H 


o 


























o 


















H 


o 
























H 


1-1 o 

O CM 


CM 

o 


CO 

o 


in 

o 


m vD 


1-1 


OS 
CM 


CM CO 
CO CO 


O 


1 
o 
















18 








I 
1-1 


1 
1-1 
















o 


o 
























O 


o 

















o 
o 

• 

o 

o 
m 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
m 



■CO- 



■CO- 



o o o 

o o o 

• • • 

o o o 

o o o 

t-l O c^ 



•CO- 



o 
o 

• 

m 

vD 



■co- 



o o 

o o 

• • 

o o 

o o 

in cNj 

•k 
in 



■co- 



o o o o 

o o o o 

• • • • 

■-I o o o 

i-i t-t in o 



o 
o 



ON 

m 



■CO- 



o o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 


• • 


• 


• 


o in 


o 


m 


in cjN 


m 




a» CO 


i-i 





o o 
o o 

• • 

o o 
m m 
t-t en 



■to- 



o 

o 

• 

o 
o 
o 

CV| 



■CO- 



o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


• 


• 


• 


• 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CM 


in 


1^ 


I-I 




1-4 


CN 



■co- 



•CO- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 

CO 



■CO- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 

CO 



■co- 



o o o o 
o o o o 

• • • • 

o o o o 
o o o o 
m 1-1 o CO 



■CO- 



cNi in m 
-d- CO r-* 



\0 CM CM 
1-) I-I o 
<f 00 CO 



■CO- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
in 



■CO- 



o 
m 



o o o o o o o 
o o o o o o o 



o o o 
o o o 
m eg in 

«^ 

m 



o o o 
•-4 in o 



■CO- 



o o 

O csi 



o 
o 



CM 
CM 



CO 



•CO- 



vO O O 

o o o 



m 



o m 
o r<. 

O CO 



<o- 



o 
o 

• 

•4- 
r^ 

o 

CO 



■CO- 



CM <T\ 

m ON 



m 



■CO- 

o o 
o o 

• • 

o o 
o o 

O eg 

m 



■co- 



co 



o 
o 

• 
t-i 

•cJ- 



■CO- 



CM 



oooooooo 
oooooooo 

• ••••••• 

omooomooo 
in ON CM in o m m 

CJN CO .-I CO i-l CO 



■CO- 



O CM 

m r^ 



o o 

CM O 



O vO 



o 
o 



o o 
o o 

• • 

o o 

O vO 



m 
in 



■CO- 

o 
o 



CO 

m 



■CO- 



o 1^ 
0^ CO 



■CO- 



CO in 

CM 



CO >a- 

vO t-l 

I-l CO 



o 
o 

• 
00 
CM 
CO 

CM 



■co- 



00 

m 



o o o o 
o o o o 

• • • • 

o o m o 

O CM CM m 



■CO- 

o 



O CM 

o -3- 



o o 


o o 


o o 


o o 


• • 


• • 


in o 


o in 


r^ m 


in 


00 CO 


CM 



o o 
o o 

• • 

o o 
m o 

I-l CO 



■CO- 



00 
00 



•CO- 

o 
o 

• 

o 
CO 

CJN 



■CO- 



CM 



■co- 



in m 
CM vd- 



o 
o 

• 

in 

ON 
CM 



■CO- 



CM 

in 



CM 

I— I 

CO 



■CO- 



o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


• 


• 


• 


• 


o 


m 


o 


m 


CO 


CM 


-3- 


ON 



■CO- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 

CO 



•CO- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 

CO 



■CO- 



m 


in 


r^ 


r^ 


• 


• 


00 


00 


c^ 


ON 


CM 


CM 



■CO- 



■co- 

o o 

o o 

• • 

vl- o 

00 <-l 

CO 



■co- 



■CO- 

o 
o 

• 
ON 

CO 



■co- 






o 

■M 



4J 















I-l 












(U 






cu 


































CJ 












•o 






CO 
























(0 






















•H 






C 




x^s 




















<u 










>% 






(0 






CO 






<u 




>■. CO 




















m 






Ui 




4J 






<u 






(U 






o. 




4J <U 




















G 






<D 




3 






(0 






M 






X 




3 m 


















(U 


S 






<U 




CX 




I-l 


pi 












w 




O. C 










^1 








o 


cu 






(X4 




0) 




CO 


(U 






•h 










(U <u 










<U 








•H 


a 










p 




+J 


04 






(U 






•k 




Q q< 










u 


M 






£S 


u 






Q) 




'V-' 




a 


X 






I-l 






CO 




^ X 










3 


U 












I-l 








<u 


u 






(0 






<u 




fa 










CO 


H 






Q) O 


m 






O 




Oi 




^ 






pci 


CO 






<u 




O- ^ 










oa 


H 






CO (U 








•H 




I-l 






pi 




O 








fa 




-^ C 










cu 


M 






G 


"ia 






^ 




(U 




4J 


o 




E-" 


>< 




(U 






<U o 










j-i 


s 






U CO 


<u 




!:>^ 


(U 


CO 


m 




a 


•H 




U 


CO 


CO 


c 


£- 




ffi tH 






CO 




H 


s 




CO 


<U iH 


B 


<u 


Pi 


> 


(U 






0) 


4J 


cu 


M 


H 


(U 


o 




4J 


CU 


■y^ 


<u 




<u 


o 




cu 


•U I-l 


B 


bO 


a 




•H 


0) 




g 


(i: 


bO 


hJ 




•H 


^ 


4J 




CU C 


bO 


w 


•H 




rt^ SP 


a 




•H 


:3 (U 


o 


CO 


hJ 


U 


I-l 


o 




cu 


S 


CO 


hJ 


• • 


I-l 


CI. 


CO 




O (U 


CO 


E^ 


I-l 




J-) CO 




rid 


I— 1 


cu o 


<u 


4-> 


CJ 


o 


Cu 


•H 


CO 


•H 


> 


+J 


O 


CO 


a. 


<u 


•H 


CO 


•^ ^ 


4J 


IZD 


a. 


CO 


3 ■•-> 


H 


>-t 


o* 


B to 


I-t 


CO 




4-) 


Cu'^-t 


Q) 


3 


c 


CO 


O 


0) 


a,rH 


W) 


CU 


CH C 


CO 


CO 


a. 


CU 


D. CO 


fa 


cu 


a. 


O -H 


(U 


o 


^ 


o 


3 


«« 


P 


cr 


o 


o 




<u 


3 


cu 


CU 


3 


M-l O 


o 




p 


3 


CU O 


05 


I— 1 


3 


o S 


CO 


On 


o 


S 


CO 


o 


O 


w 


CJ 


Oi 


^ 


fa 


CO 


H 


Oi 


Q 


O CJ 


&< 


CO 


p 


P P^ 


g 


CJ 


CO 


m \o 


vO 


r- 


I-l 


CM 


o 


r-- 


CM 


vO 


I^ 


I-l 


CM 


in 


vD 


r^ 


O NO 


1^ 


H 


I-l 


r^ 


O r-- 


PQ 


I-) 


CM 


CO CO 


CO 


CO 




o 


O 


CM 


I-l 


CO 


CO 


CO 




o 


O 


o 


I-l 


I-l 


CM CO 


CO 




o 


I-l 


CM CO 




o 


O 


1 






1 


1 














1 


1 














1 


1 






1 


1 




iH 






CM 


CM 














CO 


CO 














<1- 


<»■ 






m 


in 




o 






O 


O 














o 


o 














o 

1 


o 






o 


o 





19 



o o o o 

o o o o 

• • • • 

o o m vo 

o »-• <— I t— I 
vO 

CO 



■CO- 



o o o o o 
o o o o o 



o o 

O 1-1 

CO 



•CO- 



«n 



O vO 

O r-l 
CO 



o 
o 



CO 



<n- 



o 
o 



ON 
CO 



■«/> 



o 
o 

• 

o 

CO 



</> 



o o 

o o 

• • 

o o 

CO o 



<r>- 



o 
o 

• 

o 

CO 



</> 



o 
o 

• 

o 

CO 



</> 



o o o o o 
o o o o o 

• • • • • 

O O O O vO 

in >d- 00 o lo 

<N <N 



•co- 



o o o o o 
o o o o o 

• • • • • 

O O O O vO 

lo <!• ON o m 



•co- 



o 
o 

• 
vO 

CNJ 

vO 



■vy 



o 
o 

• 
CO 



<n- 



o o 

o o 

• • 

o o 

o m 
m 



<f> 



o o 
o o 

• • 

o o 
o m 
m 



</> 



o 
o 

• 

o 
m 



</>- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
in 
m 



</> 



o o o o o 

o o o o o 

• • • • • 

in o m m o 

r>. CO cvj cNj vo 

CO CM CO 



■co- 



o o o o o o 
o o o o o o 

• ••••• 

o o m in o o 

O ON CN eg vO vO 
vO CM CO 



o 
o 

• 
CM 



</> 



O --^ 

• • 
i-l CO 

O ON 

CM 



■co- 

o o 
o o 

• • 

o m 
o 1^ 
in 

CO 



■to- 



ON 

00 

CM 



O 
O 

• 

m 
in 

CO 



■CO- 



o 
o 

CO 



o 
o 

• 

o 

CO 



</> 



o 
o 

CO 



00 
00 



o 
o 



■CO- 

o 
o 

• 

o 

CO 



<n- 



■co- 



co 

• 
CM 
CO 



•co- 



■CO- 



o m o 

o o o 

• • • 

m o CO 

r^ 1-4 CM 

CO 



■to- 

o o o 

o o o 

• • • 

o o o 

o m o 

m CM 



in 


o o o o o o 


m o 


o 


o o CO m o o 


1^ o 


• 


• ••••• 


• • 


<r 


m m 00 CO o m 


CM 00 


i-i 


r^ CO in CM o «-• 


O -* 


<r 


CO t-l 1-t CM 


CM 



■co- 



<J> 



o 
o 

• 
o 
m 



<j> 



■co- 

ooooooooo 
ooooooooo 



m o m o o o 
r^ CO CM m CM CM 

CO i-< p-t 



■CO- 



ON 



o «* 

O CM 



CO 

2 









cu 












Z 







































































h-l 
















C 












M 




















H 
















CO 










O. 


CO 




































c 










I-l 


CO 




























(^ 






(U 










(U 


M 


cu 


















g^ 




CO 






o 






4-» 










s 


s 

" 





















CO 


^-N 


■p 






H 






a 














•H 


















M 


CO 









U 






•H 










(U 





IH 





















N—' 


»H OT 




00 


W 






CO 













u 


«4-l 


















M 




r-l ^ 




G 


cu 






s 


04 








•H 















f-4 








pel 


(0 


CO M 




•H 


CO 








t-i 








(M 


z 












p^ 










i-l 


m <u 




i-l 


z 






4J 


<u 




CO 




4-1 





•^ 










w 








«ej 


u 


I-l 




(U 


M 




CO 


C 


X 






CO 





M 


CO 















CO 


CO 




m 


CO OOCJ 


CO 


4-> CO 






(U 


CU 




(U 


S 


(U 




H 


(U 








cu 


<! 




cu 


(U 


CO 


•H +J 


cu Id 


i-l 


CO V4 CO 


O 




•H 


s 


(U 


bO 


5 


•H 


•k 


<! 


•H 








60 




£• 


•H 


CO 


Z 


£2 


•H -H 4J 


CU 


•H 0) 


Z 




i-< 


D. 





CO 


|j^ 


i-l 


^ 


> 


I-l 


CO 




r-l 


00 


w 


I-l 


c 





I-l -P 


U 


OO-M J3 


M 


CO 


a. 


•H 


•H 


4J 




CU 


!-• 


crj 


a^ 


CO 


CO 


4-> 


^ 


CO 


CU 


<0 


M 


0) <u 


o* C «-i 


a 


(U •H 


O 


<u 


04 


3 


M-» 


CO 


H 


a. 


(U 


M 


O4 





<u 


bO 


CO 


r-^ 


O4 


Cu 


H 


O.TJ 


Ji-H I-l 


3 


»4 a i 

Q) CO 9 


hJ 


(U 


3 


crm 





CO 


3 


rH 


CO 


3 





3 


CU 





PL4 


CO 


3 


X 


a 


^ 5 


3 i-l CO 





M 


fe 


CO 


w 





Pu 


tD 


CO 


u 


z 


CO 


PQ 


Q 


I-) 


(U 


hJ 


CO 


CO 


M 


M 


CO S 


CO Oi PQ 


CJ 


PC! •-) hJi 


t) 












PS 



























hJ 










CQ 


t-< 


Csl 


CO 





r>. 


H 


CNl 





u 


CM 


CM 


1^ 


CO 


ON 


^ 


I-l 


CM 


vO 


u 


I-l I-l 


CM CM 





I-* 




o 








CM 


CO 







CM 










I-l 


I-l 


I-l 










CO 







CNl 


CM 


CM CO 


1 


1 










1 


1 




J. 


1 










1 


1 






1 


1 








vO 


\D 










r-- 


r^ 




00 


CO 










ON 


C3N 


















O 


O 










































I-l 


1-4 









20 



o 
o 

• 

in 
m 



•</)- 



o 
o 

• 

m 
m 



•CO- 



vO 

CO 

• 

o 
«n 

■CO- 



o 
o 

• 



</><n- 



o 
o 

• 



o 
o 

• 

m 
in 



■co- 



o o 
o o 



00 

CO 



m 



O 0^ 

CM a\ 



<o- 

o 
o 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 

CM 



•CO- 



o 
o 

• 
CM 

o 

\0 



■co- 



co 

• 

CM 
00 

CO 



■CO- 

o 
o 

• 

o 

lO 
CM 



■CO- 



o o o 
o o o 

9 • • 

o o o 
o uo m 
in CO i-< 



■co- 



o o o 
o o o 

• • • 

o o o 
o m o 
m CO CM 



■CO- 



o o o 
o o o 

• • • 

o o o 
o m o 
in CO CO 



■CO- 

o o o 
o o o 

• • • 

o o o 
o m o 
•n CO CO 



■CO- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 



■CO- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
m 

o 



<o- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
m 



■CO- 

o 
o 

• 
o 
m 



•CO- 



o o 

o o 

o o 

CO o 



■CO- 



O Q 

o o 

• • 

o o 

CO o 



o o 
o o 



o o o o 
o o o o 



O O O 04 O O 

\o in i^ r^ o o 

«— I CM vO O 



o o o o o 
o o o o o 

• • • • • 

O O O CM O 

vo m 1^ r^ o 

f-< CM vD 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 

CM 



•c/> 



comoooo-^-oo^moo 

• ••••••••• 

i-i?Hi-io^c7^voooo>«d"in 
vocMinr^^^^d-r^-o^rHi^ 

CM .-I CM in CM r-l 



■co- 

ooooooooo 
ooooooooo 

• •••••••• 

ooooooomo 
Olno^<^lnln^ocsln 
r-t i-i CM m «* 



<o- 



o 
o 

• 
CM 
00 
CM 

CO 



</> 



o 
o 

• 
CM 
00 
CM 

CO 



■co- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
m 

CO 



■CO- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
m 

CO 



■CO- 



Ov 


vO 


<!■ 


CM 


• 


• 


r^ 


r*- 


r«» 


1-1 


00 


m 


•« 


•« 


1-4 


CO 



■co- 



■co- 



•co- 



CO 



■CO- 



o o o 

o o o 

• • • 

O CO O 

O O^ 00 

CM "^ 1-) 

i-< CO 



■CO- 



o o o 

o o o 

• • • 

O CO o 

o c^ 00 

CM <f i-l 

i-l CO 



o 
o 

• 
CO 

00 



■CO- 



■co- 



o o o 

o o o 

• • • 

O CO o 

O O 00 

CM <r t-4 

t-4 CM 



■CO- 



■co- 



o 
o 

• 
CO 
00 

r^ 

CO 



■CO- 



o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


CO 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


m 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


i-i 


o 


o 


CO 


00 


1-4 


1^ 


o 


CM 


m 


1-1 


<3N 



CM 



■CO- 



CO 



■CO- 



O 
O 

• 

o 
o 

CM 



•CO- 



o 


vO 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


• 


• 


• 


CO 


NO 


o 


r^ 


t^ 


o 


00 


o 


CM 



m 



•CO- 



•CO- 





























f 










































.l 




a 






B 






y-^ 


























f-l 









CO 


Q) 






>-< 


























CU 




•H 




>» 


J-> 






<u 




























J*-* 


(0 




CO 


to 






4J 
























(0 


•> 


H 


CO 


^ 




>» 






P 














0) 










(U 


M 


pc3 


•H 


^ 


4J 


CO 






Ou 






CO 








o 













(U 


M 


3 


U 


C 




h3 




s 






(U 








fi 






p 




♦H 


I-l 


a« 


3 


S 


(U 


4-> 






5 


H 


^^ 


o 

•H 








2 






cd 




& 






§ 



CJ) 


fa 


.&•§ 


§ 




p I-l "^^ 


g 


CO 0) 


4J 








cd 0) 






tH 




(U 


U 


PU 




M 


u 


2 


fa 




O (0 


1-4 I-l 


CO 






(U 


+J 4-» 






<J 




CO 






S 


H 


Xt 'H 


<u 


fa 




(U -P 4J 


o 


CO cd 


3 






o 


a 












bO 


fa 


fa 


Cd -u 


u 


CO 


ij 


fi G m 


CJ 


CO CO 


T) 






a 


<U 'H 






a> 


IH 


C 


a 





H 


PS 


(U (U 


•H 




^ 


CO (U •H 










CO 


a 


PS iS 






a 


•H 


cd 


•H 








fa ps 


■P 


^ 


«H (k: i-j 


4 


• CO 


I-l 


i-J 


(U 


c 


s 


w 










•H 


1-4 


hJ 





CO 




<U 


CJ 


•-I 


m • 


cd 




•H 


^ 


4J 


u 


w 


A 




-o 


1-4 


< 


•P 


fa 


M (U 


PS 


I-l 


fa 


<l> t-l ,^ 


cu 


Q) ^ 


•H 


4C 


1-4 


u 


(U ^ 


•H 


4J 


Cli 


•V 





(d 


CO 




fa 


3 




p^ 


fa 


O Ti O 


M 


bO i-l 


o 


5C 


cu 


ti 


04 


(d ^ 


0) 


1-4 


4J 


■u 


M 


•T3 


^ 


^ 'H 


<u 


5 


CO 


CO at <u 


o 


TS (U 


<u 




Cl<i-4 


M 


04 


60 I-l 


(U 


(0 


(0 


S 


•H 





■M 1-4 


u 


a 




•H ^ 43 


M 


3 <-* 


cu 


2; 


3 


(d 


eO I-l 


0) 


•H 


<u 


3 


3 


a 


Cd 


hJ 


M 


•H 


fa 


h- 1 


S O O 




*-i CJ 


CO 


g 


CO 


S a a ed fj H fa 


U 


l-l 




fa 


fa 


< fa 


fa 


CO 


vO vO Ov 


g 


I-l t-i 


o 


CM 


CO 


CO CO 


CO 


^a- in vo 





OJ 











J 


1 ■ 


CO CO CO 




O O 


CM 




o 


o 

















CO 


CO 















^ 


Q 


1 

o 


1 
f-i 


1 

1-4 




1 
CM 


1 

CM 


















1 

CO 


1 

CO 


1 


1 







6 


fH 


i-l 


fH 




rH 


T-i 


















I-l 


I-l 


1-4 


1-4 







M 


f-4 


f-4 


tH 




r-l 


f-4 


















1-4 


1-4 


•H 


1-4 




to 


x 



21 



o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


1^ 


o 


o 


o 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


o 


ON 


o 


o 


>^ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


ON 


o 


o 


ON 


o 


o 


o 


r^ 


CO 


o 


m 


CM 


o 


lO 


1-4 



<N| 



CN 



CN 



eg 



ooooooooooooo 
omommoooooooo 



o o o o o 
o o o o o 



vDCNj<fr~-r^i— i<l-mooooNO 
o>-ir^ioin<|-i-ir^cNiocvi<t-o 
i^ONi— iooc»inoNc»voinm>d"in 

ONr^r^vDvDvDCN<ft-(C>J 



O O O 00 o 

o o o <«• OJ 

in o vo <N 

CM 



</> 



<o- 



■CO- 



v> 



•CO- 



■CO- 



■CO- 



■CO- 



■CO- 



o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


r- 


o 


o 


o 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


o 


o 


o 


o 


<r 


o 


o 


o 


o 


ON 


o 


o 


ON 


o 


o 


o 


r^ 


c^ 


o 


in 


CM 


o 


m 


1—1 


•^ 




m, 


•k 


•k 


«k 


•b 


•V 



eg 



CM 



CM 



CM 



ooooooooooooo 
moinoooooooooo 



cMoocjNcocoi-(<i-inooocjNO 

CMi— lr^vDvD<l-i— II^CMOCM<fO 

oocMo<3Ninc:NoovDinin-d'<i' 

OOOr^vO\OvOCM>d"i-ICM 



o o o o o 
o o o o o 



o o in 00 o 

O O 00 <f <N 

in O vD CM 

CM 



<o- 



<o- 



■00- 



■co- 



■CO- 



■CO- 



<fi- 



<J> 



</> 



O 
O 

• 

ON 
ON 

m 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 

vD 

cs 



o 


o 


o 


O 00 


m 


o 


m 


O 


vD 


<!■ 


in 


vO 


in 


<r 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o oJ 


vO 


o 


I— 1 


O 


<r 


O 


CO 


CM 


00 


m 


o 


O 


• 


• 


• 


• • 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


o 


o 


o 


O 1^ 


in 


o 


vO 


o 


<!• 


r^ 


i^ 


ON 


CM 


v£> 


o 


c:n 


o 


o 


o 


o ^ 


in 


CM 


t-\ 


CM 


CO 


00 


00 


CM 


00 


C3N 


r^ 


o 


CM 


in 


00 


m "^ 


f^ 


vD 


CM 


m 


vO 


<r 




<t- 


O^ 


in 




CM 



ON r^ v£> vo ^n CO 



vO 



CM 



•co- 



■CO- 



<o- 



o 
o 

• 

o 

ON 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 

NO 

CM 



o o o o o o 
o o o o o o 

• ••••• 

O O O O O 00 
O O O O O CO 

CM in 00 in in CO 

•^ «k •« v^ «% •« 

C3N 1^ vO vO vD -^ 



OOOOOOOOO O 

ooooooocoo o 

• •••••••• • 

oi^ooooo<i-o o 

CMONCMOOOOOCOO O 

vocMininm cocmvo cm 

1-4 vO CO 



•CO- 



</> 



<n- 



<: 

M 
CJ 
M 

CO 



O 

E-" 



<: 

M 
CJ 

W 

CO 



cy 



O 



< 
M 
CJ 
W 
Oi 
CO 

CM 



CO 

.-J 

M 
O 
CO 



o 

CO 

u 

CM 



t-1 

<: 

M 
CJ 
W 

CO 

M 
CO 



CJ 



CM 



:3 



(0 

o 

> 

o 
>-< 

cu 



< 

\-\ 

CJ 
M 
Oi 
CO 

CO 



^ 5 



<: 

M 
U 
M 

CO 

PJ 
W 

w 

M 
O 

IS 

w 



o 



<: 

M 
CJ 

w 

CO 

fM 

M 

CO 

12 
O 
i-J 
yA 
M 























CO 







































i-l 
















•H 






















<u 
















-o 




















CO 


o 
















'^ 








1-1 


OJ 


CO 


<t 


m 


vO 


-O 


•H 
















Pd 








=*: 


=S= 


=«= 


=*{= 


=*: 


=fe 


CO 


14-1 
«4-l 
















N-^ 








C 


c 


c 


c 


C 


c 


P 


O 














CO 


in 






4-) 


(0 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o 
















4J 


^ 






C 


B 


6 


6 


e 


e 


6 




1-1 <U 








CO 






CO 


•H 






<0 


i-i 


1-4 


1-1 


r-l 


1-4 


1-4 


1-4 


CO o 








J-l 






CU 


CO 


P-I 


m 


<u 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


•H -H 


CO 






•H 




to 


E-< 


0. 


^ 


<u 


W) 


!-< 


!-4 


!-i 


!-l 


u 


u 


o 


O > 


cu 






CO 




cu 




(U 


w 


•H 


!-t 


4J 


-p 


+J 


J-> 


4J 


4J 


A 


<U 5-1 


•H 






O4 




A 


r-4 


p:^ 


s 


A 


(U 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


O 


CU CU 


1-1 






0) 




3 







E- 


CJ 


CO 


CM 


CM 


Ph 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO CO 


o^ 






pc: 


r-4 


E-" 


A 


c^ 


^ 






















o^ 


CO 






•H 









1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 bC 


3 


(U 


1-1 


TJ 





Xl 





4J 


CM 


CO 


en 


CO 


CO 


CO 


(» 


CO 


CO 


OT 


CO C 


CO 


c 


•H 


d 




PJ 


1-4 


c 


u 


(U 


0) 


(U 


cu 


CU 


<U 


cu 


cu 


CU 


CU 'H 




o 


O 


CO 


X» 


CO 


<: 


(U 


Q 


•H 


•H 


•H 


•H 


•H 


•H 


•H 


•H 


•H 


•H 5-1 


cu 


A 






fi 






B 




M 


J-» 


!-i 


!-i 


!-t 


!-t 


5-1 


!-i 


^ 


U (U 


o 


a, 


•V 


CO 


CO 


OT 


TJ 


Di 


M 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 15 


•H 


cu 


1-1 


4J 




cu 





•H 


a 


I-l 


■— 1 


1-1 


•-I 


1-1 


1-4 


1-4 


1-4 


1-1 


1-1 OT 


«4-( 


1-4 


(U 


!-i 


CO 


u 





3 


h-l 


0} 


CO 


CO 


CO 


(« 


CO 


CO 


(0 


CO 


(0 a 


14-4 


0) 


3 


CO 


CO 


♦H 


r-4 


cr 


o 

cu 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO <; 


o 


H 


Pm 


CM 





E-" 


CQ 


w 


i-H 


1-1 


r-K 


1-4 


1-4 


1-4 


1-1 


r-l 


1-1 


r-4 <f 


CM 


m 


vD 


CO 


00 


CJN 


CM 


CO 


1 
o 


o 

1 
o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


O CO 


o 


o 


O 











1-1 


I-l 




































o 


o 






































CM 





































22 



o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


m 


in 


in 


o 


o 


CO 


OJ 


eg 


o 


in 




i-i 


m 


ft 


<r 



<ry 



o 


O 


O 


o 


in 


O 


• 


• 


• 


m 


-* 


r^ 


CS 


in 


CO 


00 


00 


00 


•k 


•^ 


* 


vD 


ON 


in 




vD 


i-i 



■CO- -co- 



o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


m 


o 


in 


o 


o 


CO 


m 


eg 


m 


o 




CM 


in 


CS 


<!• 



■CO- 



o 


o o 


o 


o o 


• 


• • 


in 


CO r«» 


CM 


O CO 


00 


00 00 


*^ 


•«. • 


vO 


o m 




r^ I-I 



■CO- ■CO- 



O CO 


<f 


m 


o 


o 


«* 


CM 


O 00 


<f o 


O I^ 


m 


CM 


o 


o 


CO 


in 


O CO 


CO o 


m 00 


1-4 


1-4 


o 


in 


vO 


NO 


00 <t 


CN 00 


1-4 CN 


vO 


o 


I-I 


CM 


<r 


<t- 


CO r^ 


CM CM 


CM 


in 


CSJ 


cs 


I-I 






f-i I-I 

CO 


58,9 
9,8 


■CO- 
















■CO- ■CO- 



o o 
o o 

• • 

m o 

I-I CM 



■CO- 



o 
o 



o 
o 



o o 
in ON 
-* 1-1 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 



CO 



o o 

CO o 

• • 

-d- m 

vo in 

O 00 

ON ON 

m 



■CO-^CO- 



C 

•H 

a, 
o 
ft 

CO (U 

(U > 
■U 0) 1-4 
cd Q I-I 

r" < 

c 

r-4 
O CO 

(U O I-I 
3 'H .H 

Q m h 



CO 
Q> 
CO 

a 

s- 

<^ 
o 

•H 
4-) 

c 

(U 

o 

o 

bD 
C CO 

•H - 

.r: 4-1 

4J (U 

O 'H 

1-4 iC 

a a 



CO 

u 

Q) 
O 
•H 
14-4 

m 
o 



CO CO 



I-I 
o 

14^ 



3 

+J 

•H 
■13 



•H 
> 

u 



CO 

3 

o 

CO <U 

CO (U f! 
1-4 O «J 
CO C »-4 

O CO 1-1 

•H f-H 0) 

CO 3 O 

>»rQ CO 

SIS 



CJ CO 
Q) 

X CO 



M 



CU 1-1 
bO CO 

CO 4J 

■U -H 

CO O4 O 

O CO <U 

(1| CJ CO 



•H 
CO 

4-> 
(U 



t^inr^oovOvovovor^cMo 

f-fCMCMCMCOCOcOCOCOCOCN 

I 

o 
o 

CM 



u 

CO 

CO 

M 

u 
I-I 

> 

CO 

X 

a 

CI. 
CO 



o 

CM 

































• 


• 


• 


• 


• 











I-I 


■-I 


m 


in 


vD 


r-4 


r^ 


r^ 


CM 


m 


CO 


00 



</> 



000 
000 



o o 
o o 



o <r o o '-4 
o o m NO 1-1 
<T» m CM m CO 



•CO- 



CM 



■CO- 



o 
o 

• 

m 

CM 

m 

CO 



•CO- 



•CO- 

0000 
0000 

• • • • 

0000 
o o m o 

r- <t CM CM 



■CO- 



CM 



■CO- 

o 
o 

• 

o 
in 
in 

«^ 

CM 



•CO- 



000000 
000000 



0000000000 
0000000000 



000000 

o in o m o in 
o 00 1-4 CM in 1-4 

CO <!• 



•co- 



000000 
000000 



0000000000 

-*ooooini-iincNin 
in m m t-4 CM in 1^ 



0000000000 
0000000000 



000000 
o in o in o m 
o 00 1-4 CM in t-i 

CO <r 



0000000000 
-d-oooomi-imcMin 
in m m i-i CM m 1^ 



■CO- 



CM 


NO 


00 


in 


00 


<JN 


r>. 


m 


• 


• 


• 


• • 





NO 


r^ 


1^ 


r^ 


1-4 


CO 





NO 


-* 





in 



OOnOOOnOi-IOO 

oc7Nr-«0NC0NO00ON 

• ••••••• 

mcjNOONOoomin 
cocMinocoNO<tNO 
1-4 1-4 CO 1-4 <!• m CM 



CO 


000 


-* 


000 


• 


• • • 





<t 


NO 


CM m 


1-4 


m 1^ CM 



CO CO 



■CO- 

o o 
o o 

• • 

o o 
o o 

O CM 

CO <r 



■CO- 



0000000000 

ooomoooooo 

• ••••••••• 

ooocooommmo 
momomocMCMi^NO 

CMiniHCM<rincOr-4CM 



000 
000 

• • • 

000 
CM m o 
m r^ CM 



4J 

3 
P 



§ 



Pi 
o 

M 

o 

o 
o 
o 

I 

CM 

o 

CM 



1-4 I-I ON 00 CM 
O O 1-1 CO CO 

I 
CM 
O 
CM 



M 

I 

CO 

o 

CM 



01 

u 

> 

•H 
« 
O 
0) 

PC 

M O 
O •H 

•H CO 
a PA 
O 

CO 
<U O CO 

o 1-1 m 

•H 

> I I 

U u u 

<u a a 

CO (U 0) 

00 a o« 

•H 3 3 
>-l o* o* 

CO 12 ^ 
C <U 0) 

-5 z 2: 

^,_(,_ICMCOCOCO>a"inNOCJNOOONCO*d"^CMCM 
O0000i-400000000«-«COCOCO 

I 

CO 

o 

CM 































01 










>% 




















>» 










CO 




















CO 










-a 




CO 


























C 




(n CO CU 
















00 










3 




-4 J«J S 
















CJ 










CO 




rH 3 

•H 3 CI4 
















•H 
■P Qj 










•% 




tw >-l 
















CO 










a 




(U H 














CO 


0) c: 










CU 




OS +j 














^ 


X cd 










B 




•k 

















c 










Q) 




• ui m 














3 


00 (u 










U 




bO »-< M 


CO 












»^ 


C -y 


CO 








•H 




C .H 'tA 


(U 












H 


•H C 


00 








Pm 




•H CO CO 


CO 














d mh 


^S 


j-J 


f-l 


M-l 






■P O4 CU 


c: 












J-i 


CO CO 


a 


2 


<U 


1-4 


m 


X <u <u 


CU 






1-4 









<u a 


eo 


Q) 


M 


•H 


I-I 


<D 


M (x: pei 


CU 


>> 




<u 




1-4 


U-t 


f-i 


1-1 >. 


B 




^ 


00 


Q> 




X 


4J 


CO 


3 




•H 




" e 


CO Xi 


CU 


p-i 


a 


a 


(X4 


»v 'O TJ 


w 


•H 


(U 


Pi^ 







CO 


CO CO 


-H 


S 








CO qi a 







C 








CU 


•^ CO 


m CU 


3 


1 


1 


(0 


CU CO CO 


a 


•H 





bO 




•0 


>H 


W 1-1 




cr 


PL. 


&•& 


ci-i 


•H 

1-4 CO CO 




•H 


!-i 

4J 


CU 




CO 


g 


M 

(U 


tA 


CO 3 <U 




P 


CO 


CO 


<u 


CU ■)-> -u 


4J 





(U 


4J 


CU 




4J 


CO CU 


I— 1 CU g CU 


> 




I-I 


1-4 


•H 


CU M M 


CO 


<U 


1-4 


OS 


^ 


CO 


■P 


CU u 


CO <U CO X 


(U 


M 


CO 


CO ^ 


3 CO CO 


4J 


i-l 


(U 


(U 


•H 


CO 


CO 


<U -H 


CO Q W 


z 


PCJ 


CO 


CO 





CO Oj On 


CO 


M 


H 


X 


H 





PQ 


Pd (X4 



23 



o o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 


• • 


• 


• 


o in 


o 


in 


o -ci- 


in 


vO 


ts 


CM 


m 



<o- 



cs 



</> 



o o 
o o 

• • 

o in 
O r^ 

CO t-4 



■co- 



o 
o 

• 

in 



<n- 



ooooooooo 
ooooooooo 

• •••••••• 

cvicsmvooooovo 

COi— ICMO^O^vOlnO<T^ 
<f r-t CO 



</> 



O 

o 



CS 



</> 



oooooooooo 
oooooooooo 

• ••••••••• 

oo<t"Oinoinoino 
oinmoi^inr^ovoo 
1^ in CO r^ o r^ o 



CS 



CO 



<» 



c 
c 

t 

CS 

CO 

« 

O 
i-l 



<o 



o o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 


• • 


• 


• 


o in 


o 


in 


o <!• 


m 


vO 


CS 


CS 


m 



<n- 



cs 



•CO- 



o 


in 


o o 


m 


CJN 


l-» 


<N 


<t- o 


00 


CO 


• 


• 


• • 


• 


• 


o 


o 


o cs 


CO 


O 


00 


CO 


O CS 


1^ 


a^ 




00 


<r 


vD 


r-l 



o o o 

o o o 

• • • 

o o o 

o o o 

CS 0^ <|- 



</> 



CS 



O 

m 

00 

o 
o 

CO 



•CO- 



o o o 
o o o 

• • • 

o o m 
o o r^ 

CS CO p-l 



•co- 



cg o 

00 i-H 

• • 
00 in 

IT) 1—1 
CM 1-1 



•CO- 

o o 

o o 

• • 

o o 

o o 

CS i-< 



•CO- 



o 
o 

• 

m 



•to- 



es 

CO 
CO 



•CO- 

o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
CO 



•co- 



ooooooooo 
ooooooooo 

• •••••••• 

cscsinvDoooovo 
corHcsoNCT^omoo^ 

-d" .-I CO 



■CO- 



o 
o 

• 

o 



•CO- 



r-^* 


CO 


m 


o 


1^ 


m 


i^ 


m 


• 


• 


• 


• 


CM 


o 


r^ 


<f 


-d- 


CO 


CM 


r-i 



o o 
m 00 

• • 

CTv 00 



w 
Pi 



o 
o 



CM 



•co- 



in 

00 

in 
m 



•CO- 

o 
o 



00 



•CO- 



oooooooooo 
oooooooooo 

• ••••••••• 

oo-d-omomomo 
oininvor-inr--ovDo 
r^ m CO r- o r>. o 



•CO- 



o o 

O vO 

• • 
1-1 00 



•co- 



o 

O 



o 
o 

• • 

o m 
o 1^ 
r^ CO 



•co- 



cs 



CO 



o 
o 

• 

o 

CM 

CO 



■CO- 



o o 


O O ON 


o 


o <r 


o o -d- 


<t 


• • 


• • • 


• 


r-i m 


O CS CO 


r^ 


vo m 


00 CT> ON 


00 


m 


m m vo 


00 



o o 
o o 

• • 

m o 
1^ m 



o o o 

o o o 

• • • 

o o o 

o m o 

<j\ lO o 

t-i CO 



vO 



•CO- 

o 
o 

• 

o 
m 

CO 
ON 



■co- 



O to 

•H <U 

'O -H 

CO f-l 

Pi Cu 

O P 

4J CO 

to cej 
U 

•H to 

CO U 

Cu (U 

<u ^ 

pi to 



I 

to 
CO 



(0 
4J 
U 

CO 



•H 

3 

•H 
X 



s 


c 






(U 




J-l 


n 




•H 


•H 




< 


CO 




1 


1 




4-J 


■u 


CO 


C 


C 


P 


(U 


<u 


o 


B 


E 


<u 


Oa Cl, C 


•H 


•H 


CO 


3 


P 


I-( 


a* 


cr.-i 


u 


M 


o 


? 


^ 


to 


(U 


<u 


•H 


Z 


!Z 


S 



Oi M 



CO CS CS CS vO 

I-) O-cajn CO 
I 

CO 

o 

CS 



H 
M 

H 

CO 

:=) 

>-5 



O 



o 



O 
CM 



to 
o 

•H 
CO 



o 

•H 
O 



to 



9 & 



- p 

GO CO 



CO 

4-) 

o 

CO 



0) 

bO 

CO 

4J 
CO 

o 



o in r-- 

CS 1-1 CO 

I 

<r 

CS 



Q 
O 
O 



3 

I 

m 
o 

CS 



Vi 

o 

•H 

£ 

CO 



CO 

♦H <U 

!-< C 

to O 

•H ^ 

CU cu 

}-< (U CO 

O 1-1 0) 

cu 0) P 

CO H Q 



■p 
bO CO 

•H 



cu 

u 



cu 

•H 

•-I 

a. 

p 

CO 



<u 

bO cu 



(0 

4J 
CO 

o 



o 

•H 
(4-1 

o 



(U 
bO 

C0 

cu 
I-l 

•H 

s 

•V to 
(U cu 
to o 

(U -l-> 

a, o 
o 

•H 



to 

cu 

cu 



}-( 

CO 

o 



p 



(£) CLi 



5-1 (U 
•U bO 

CO CO 
•H cu 
bOi-i 

cu -H 



> 

•H 

p 

I 

^ ■!-> 

p cu 
CO C! 

•H 
bO.^ 
tU CO 
•H CJ 
4J 

C (U 

•H 1-1 
U -H 
PL. fa 



CO CO 

p p 

o o 

cu cu 

CO CO 



cu cu 

o o 

to OT 

•H 'H 



omr^-r^csvoinvovDvOvD 

CSOi-ICOOCOi-<i-ICOCOCO 

I 

in 
o 
CS 



o 

eg 



60 

a 

•H 

t-l 

•H 

3 

to (i! 
bO O 

O -H 
•H X) 



o 

Pl4 

o 

4-> 

p 
<: 



CO 



4-> 

CO 

c 

•1-1 
o 

cu CJ 



<u 

!-i 



T3 

CO 
X) o 

c 

CO Oi 



cu 

o 



to 
!-i 

cu 
I-l 

•H 

p 



4J 
•H 



•H 
CO ■(-) CO 
r-l M hJ 

p 
o 



•H 

f-l 

•H 

CO 
•H 

h-3 



to cu 

•H CO 



<U P 

> "Z' 

•H e! 

to I-l 

c 

cu 



CO ^ 
cu 
>. u 
cu Oi 
C B 
o o 



cu 

> 

•H 
CO 

a 

<u 

cu 
u 

§• 

o 

CJ 
CO 



PM CL, PQ S CJ 



(0 a 

SI 

»-< !-i 

cu o 
a. ^2 



cu 

•H 

,c! 

CO 

to 

na cu 

FJ P 

O .H 

"\ 

to 

CO to 

I-l o 

CS U 

•H CJ 

o 

•H cu 

m p 
14-1 1-1 

O PQ 



oooooooooo 
oooooooooo 
I 

vD 

o 

CS 



24 



o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


o 


o 


o 


m 


in 


o 


o 


o 


OO 


r^ 


l-l 


CO 


in 


1-1 


CO 



<fy 



<f> 



■co- 



co 



■co- 



co 



<j> 



CN) 



<r> 



CM 



<J> 



CM 



■CO- 



CM 



■co- 



<J> 



■CO- 



CM 



■CO- 



c^^ 



■co- 



■co- 



■co- 



■co- 



00 



■CO- 



o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


o 


o 


o 


in 


m 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


r^ 


I-l 


CO 


in 


t-i 


CO 



00 



■CO- 



o 


o 


o 


in 


vO 


o 


o 


o 


r^ 


<3^ 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


o 


o 


o 


Cvl 


0^ 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


<t- 


t-l 


o 


m 


i-H 


CM 



vO 



■CO- 



o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


o 


o 


o 


o 


in 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CM 


o 


o 


r-l 


o 


in 


I-) 


o 



■co- 



in 



■co- 



o o o o o o 

o o o o o o 

• ••••• 

o o o o o o 

o m in o o in 

t-4 ON 0^ CM CO i^ 

VO i-l r-l 



■CO- 



o o o o o o 
o o o o o o 

• ••••• 

o o o o o o 
o o o o o o 

ON CO O <!■ 00 v£> 



CM <|- CM 



■CO- 



CM 



in o 00 


O 00 CM 


CO 


vo o m 


O CM <t 


c^ 


• • • 


• • • 


• 


00 r^ CTN 


CM CO m 


o 


O i-i o 


00 <!■ <!• 


r-< 


00 CO .-1 


CM cr> m 


O 


•^ ffk «^ 


9\ ms 


•1 


1-4 \0 «-< 


i-l i-l 


CO 


•-i 




CM 



■€0- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
m 

CM 



•CO- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 

CM 



■co- 



■CO- 



CM 



■co- 



o o 
o o 

• • 

o o 
o o 
o o 



CM 



o o o o 

o o o o 

• • • • 

o o o o 

m m o o 

CM r^ o o 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 



CO 
CM 



1^ ON «* 



■CO- 



o o o o 
o o o o 

• • • • 

o o o o 
m in o o 
r^ t^ o o 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 



CO 
CM 



r^ ON -d- 



■co- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 

in 

«d- 



■CO- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
in 

•k 
in 



■CO- 



m 


o 


<d- 


o 


o 


in 


•^ 


CO 


CM 


m 


o 


CM 


r^ 


O 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


CO 


CM 


r^ 


<!■ 


CTN 


00 


m 


CO 


<t 


<r 


00 


00 


1^ 


r>. 


1-1 


CJN 


vO 


r^ 


r-\ 


CM 


CT* 


•% 


^ 


•^ 


«k 




•\ 


•1 


r^ 


r^ 


00 


CO 




r-l 


00 


CM 












** 



■CO- 



■CO--CO- 



■CO- 



■CO- 

o 

O 

• 

o 
o 
o 

m 

CO 



■to- 



o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


in 


m 


o 


o 


o 


CM 


CM 


in 


o 


o 


vD 


vO 


CM 


in 


o 


m\ 




•« 


«« 


• 


a^ 




00 


<f 


CO 
CsJ 



■co- 



o o o o 
o o o o 

• • • • 

in m o o 
CM CM m o 

vD vD CM in 



ON 



■CO- 



oo 
o *^ 



00 <f 



a\ o 
m NO 



00 m CO m 

CM CM <f CM 

ON •— ' 1 — CO 

^ •* •* •« 

I-l 1-1 CO CO 



■co- 



■CO- 



•CO- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 

CO 
CM 



■CO- 



CTN 
vO 
• 
CM 
CM 



o 

CM 



■CO- 
O 

o 

• 

o 
o 
o 

o 

CM 



■CO- 












l-J 


DC 






































<J 


hJ 






































M 


< 






































U 


W 






































M 


DC 




































!-i 


CL, 








pa 








CU 


ed 










(Q 










(U 


CO 


M 






M 








o 


a 










U 










o 




s 






s 








H 


E-I 










•H 










•H 


ac 


o 






§ 










J23 










<0 










IM 




ac 






CO 


!-i 






4J 
O 


M 
IS 


^ 












^ 






o 


<j 


>> 


CO 






(U 






X 




(U 








p^ 




0) 




E-i 




H 


u 


CJ 




9% 


c 






1-1 


•% 


C . 




I-l 








C ■M I-l 




Is 


4J 


K 


hJ 


M 




Ui 


•H U 






tJ <L» 


w 


•H U 




(L) 




TS 




•H I-l I-l Q) 




M 




kJ 


E-i 




o 


rC O 






c > 


u 


-C o 




> 




g 




rC O CO > 


H-l 


g 


1-4 
CO 


^ 


t 


CO 

M 






o xi 

CO CO 






CO CO 

J-t 


5 


o ^ 
CO CO 




CO 
>-i 




CO 




CO CO CU M 


< 


(^ 


0) 




E-" 




iz 


S hJ 






^ o 


s 


S iJ 




O 




CO 




•<< 


M 


<: 


a: 


g 


U. 


< 


p. 


M 








o 


l^ 










■I-) 






2; 


o 




CJ 


CO 


g 


h-l 


t-t I-l 


to 




4J -O 
CO C 


g 


i-i 1-1 






CO 


}-i 
CO 


S5 


1-1 I-l -a c 


cu 


Q 


4J 


s 




o 


I-l 1-1 


•H 


o 


CU CO 


M 


1-1 1-1 




CO 


•H 


CU 


z 


I-l I-l C CO 


CO 


ac 


'O 




I-l 
Pi 
ai 








o o 

H !-i 


t-l 

Oi 


•H 


^ 


o o 
u u 


4J 


13 


1-1 


15 


M 


O O CO 
J-i !-i -O 


\^ 


H 


•H 


ij 


^ 




>> >N 


o^ 


U 


-4 C 




b ^ 


1-1 


c 


a. 


O 


CO 


>^ >. u a 


a; 


.J 

w 


CO 


<: 

CO 


t-'^* 


M 
> 


O 
H 


o 


CO CO 

a< Oi 


p 

CO 


CO 


O CO 

a CO 


o 


CO CO 

CU eu 


CO 
CO 


CO 
CO 


CO 


I-l 

CM 


CO CO CO CO 

CLi CM E-^ CO 


H 


X 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


E-I 


1-1 I-l 


CM 


o 


O I-l 


H 


r-l i-H 


r- 


I-l 


CM 


CO 


pci 


I-l 1-1 O 1-1 






o 


o 


o 


O 


o 




o o 


o 


CM 


r-l I-l 




o o 


o 


I-l 


o 


o 




O O r-l 1-1 




1 
o 


1 
o 


1 

f-) 


1 

CM 


1 

CO 


1 


1 
O 


1 

o 








1 

iH 


1 

I-l 










1 

CM 


1 

CM 


M 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 








O 


o 










O 


O 


fe 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


<!■ 


<1- 








<f 


<t 










<1" 



25 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
m 



•CO-' 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 



-sf .-» 



■CO- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 



o 
o 

o 
o 
o 



-* .-< 



•CO- 



ON 



o 
o 



m o 

O CO 

-J- 

CM 



•CO- 

o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
m 

CO 



<o- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 



■CO- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 

m 



<j> 



ON 

CO 
CM 



■CO- 
O 

o 

O 
O 

in 

CO 



o o o 
o o o 

• • • 

o o o 
CM m CM 



■co- 



o o o 
o o o 

• • • 

o o o 

CM lO CM 



o o 
o o 

• • 

o »o 

i-l CM 



o 


in 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CM 


o 


o 


o 


o 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


m 


m 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CM 


i-i 


o 


o 


in 


o 


i-i 


m 


lO 


o 


o 


CM 



■co- 



■co- 



CM 



•co- 



co 



•CO- 



nO 



■co- 



■co- 



o o 
o o 

• • 

o m 

i-H CM 



■CO- 



o 


in 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CM 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


m 


m 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CM 


r-l 


o 


o 


o 


in 


o 


fH 


m 


m 


m 


o 


o 


CM 



•co- 



•co- 



CM 



■CO- 



•co- 



CO 



■CO- 



vD 



■co- 



■CO- 



vO 


00 


O O vO 


o m o 


in 


o 


00 


1^ 


o in in 


in <3N ON 


o 


o 


• 


• 


• • • 


• • • 


• 


• 


o 


T-l 


o m cxi 


ON O CM 


<t 


T-l 


m 


C3N 


t-l 1-1 CM 


CM vo m 


CO 


I-l 








in t-l 


CJN 


00 



13 
!-i 

cd 
o 

PQ 



•CO- 



■co- 

o o o 
o o o 

• • • 

o o o 
CM in CM 



■CO- 



o 


O 


>o 


O 


• 


• 


00 


o 


ON 


o 


C3N 


ON 



o o o 

o o o 

• • • 

o o m 

in o r>- 

CM m 



o 
o 

• 

o 
in 



■CO- 


■CO- 


o 


o 


o 


I-l 


• 


• 


m 


00 


NO 


I-l 


o 


00 



■CO- 



o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


• 


• 


• 


•-I 


o 


o 


00 


o 


o 


I-l 


m 


o 


M 


M 


•1 


m 


ON 


vO 



■CO- 



■CO- 



■CO- 



■CO- 



■co- 









a 


































hJ 








a 


































<d 








<d 
















M 


















M 








fH 
















o 


















U 








PU 
















(0 O CO 




^ 




^ 






iJ 


J 


U 
CU 








•h 
















(U 0) o 




M 




I-l 






< 


<J 


CO 




I-l 


I-l 


I-l 
















!> •th 




O 




CJ 






M 


M 






<U 


<u 


<u 
















O O T3 


hJ 


W 




u 






O 


CJ 


u 




CO 


(0 


to 






m a> 










.-< }-i <0 


-< 


CU 




cu 






M 


W 


H 




C 


C 


c 






u o 




O 






O CU p:J 


l-l 


CO 




CO 






CL, 


Q* 


M 




3 


P 


3 




to 


•H CJ 




•H 








CJ 








i-J 




CO 


CO 


CO 




o 


o 


o 




(U 


CO a 




•n 






•k ffi #k 


w 


CO 




H 


< 


hJ 










o 


a 


o 




•H 


On G 




CO 


CO 


4J 


4-) -P -P 


CM 


z 


ij 


s 


M 


<: 


w 


O 


O 


CO 










r-l 


Qi 0) 




(^ 


p 


a 


c c c 


CO 


o 


< 




CJ 


M 


M 


Z 


Z 


u 


IH 


m 


IH 


M 


D4 Dd ••-» "-I 






o 


0) 


(U (U (U 




M 


M 


s 


W 


O 


t=^ 


M 


I-l 


to 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


Oi 


C -H 




o 


a> 


g 


£ € £ 


O 


H 


CJ 


cu 


p-1 


M 


►J 


Q 


Q 


Z 








z 


P 


4J -H O 




4-> 


p: 


Cl4 


O^ Oj Oj 


z 


< 


M 


M 


CO 


CU 


<^ 


iJ 


hJ 


w 


to 


to 


to 


M 


CO 


C Cd 






Cd 


•H 


•H 'H 'H 


M 


u 


(U 


t3 




CO 


H 


M 


M 


a* 


V 


0) 


<1> 


(X4 




<u S ts 




W 


I-l 


P 


P P P 


^ 


M 


CO 


cy 


H 




1 


t) 


t3 


X 


o 


o 


o 


W 


(U 


S C 




M 


I-l 


cr 


cr cr cr 


§ 


p"; 




w 


IZ 


w 


M 


« 


PQ 


M 


•H 


•H 


•H 


P 


o 


cu.^ Cd 




•H 


<u 


w 


M M M 


Pu 


5 


Pd 




53 


CO 


M 






kJ 


tit 


i-J 


»4-l 


3 P to 


to 


Cd 


o 
to 


15 


IS ^ 15 


g 


<: 




g 


§ 




g 


g 


< 


(U 


<U 


<u 


I-l 


tw 


cr i-l <a 


p 


(U 


•H 


<u 


Q) <U <U 




O 


3 


M 


M 


w 


;< 


M 


M 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


> 


O 


WHO 


Q 


13:: 


S 


z 


s z z 


^ 


CJ 


K 


fe 


!=) 


u 


IS 


b 


^ 


u 








M 




















\ 


or 


o 




^^ 


^^ 


hj 


o 


o 


o 


a 


CM 


CO CO 00 


r^ 


CO 


vO 


CM 


CM CM CM 


z 


u 


M 


M 


W 




w 


M 


M 




o 


o 


o 




O 


o o o 


I-l 


I-l 


CO 


CO 


CO CO CO 


O 


u 


CJ 


CJ 




l-J 


CJ 


CJ 


CJ 


1 


1 






1 


1 














M 


M 


M 


M 


w 


M 


M 


M 


M 


r- 


r^ 






00 


00 














o 


hJ 


J 


hJ 


P£3 


> 


hJ 


iJ 


hJ 


O 


o 






o 


O 














w 


o 


O 


O 


M 


M 


o 


O 


O 


CM 


CM 






CM 


CM 














CKi 


dl 


cu 


a, 


h 


(J 


cu 


di 


CU 



26 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 

CM 

CO 



o 
o 

• 

in 

ON 
ON 

ON 

CO 



<o- 



<o- 



o o o o 

o o o o 

• • • • 

o o o o 

o o o o 

o «n m o 

•% •« ffk * 

<f t-4 JO v£> 



</)■ 



O 

o 

• 

o 
o 
o 



■CO- 



o 


<r 


o 


<r 


• 


o 


o 


Ov 


lO 


.-1 


CO 


B-HI 



00 



•co- 



■</>- 



O 
O 

• 

o 
o 
o 

ON 



■CO- 



o 


o 


o 


o 


• 


• 


CO 


so 


r-- 


00 


o 


CM 



vO 



■CO- 



CO 



■CO- 



■CO- 



■CO- 



o o o o 


o 


o 


o 


<r 


o 


o 


o o o o 


o 


o 


o 


<!■ 


o 


o 


• • • • 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


\o <r lo m 


o 


o 


o 


c^ 


o 


o 


in vo t-i \£> 


o 


o 


m 


T-l 


o 


o 


vD i-H <!■ r^ 


o 


in 


CO 


r-4 


CM 


o 


A MV tf^ M 


M 


•k 


•b 


0b 


•k 


* 


00 CM r^ i-< 


o 


CM 


00 


i-l 


CO 


ON 


i-i 


CO 













■co- 



■co- 



■co- 



m o 


r>. 00 


<!■ o 


ON vO 


• • 


• • 


CM 0^ 


<3N m 


O vO 


<r cjN 


CO \o 


<r <r 


0t 


M m, 


•CO- 


t-l CM 



00 



■CO- 



■CO- 



m 



■co- 



■co- 



\o 



■CO- 



CM 



■CO- 



\0 



■CO- 



■co- 



■CO- 



vO 


r- 


Csl 


00 


o 


CO 


• 


• 


• 


o 


r^ 


CO 


CM 


cr> 


00 


<r 


CM 


CM 



■CO- 



o 


o 


o 


CM 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


m 


o 


o 


o 


00 


r-l 


o 


in 


m 


CM 





■CO- 



o 


o 


o 


o 


• 


• 


CO 


m 


r^ 


c^ 


o 


ON 


«h 


m 


\0 


CJN 


I-l 


CO 



■CO- 



•CO- 



■CO- 



o 
o 

• 
CO 

CO 



■CO- 

o 

O 

CO 
CO 



■co- 



■co- 



■co- 



O «— 1 »-i -d" O r-- 
O CM 1^ CM o ON 
• •••••• 

m NO CO CO ON o in 

CO CJN m CM r-) 

<f m CO 



«■* 



CO 



in 



■CO- 



■CO- 



a 



o 

M 
CJ 
Pi 
CO 

o 
u 

w 

I 

o 
o 



c 

•H U 

^ o 

o ^ 

CO ca 



> 

CO 

u 
o 



•« "^ CO TS 

r-i ,-t d) 

t-l i-H .H CO 

O t-l 

>-, >, Qj C 

(0 CO p CO 

P-i Oi CO CO 

I-l t-l CM 

O O O r-l 

1 .-I 

o 
o 



g 



o 

M 

Cm 

o 

M 
CO 

w 

X 

w 



O 



I 

CO 

o 



C 
•H 
>% 

S> 
M 

CO 

o 

o 

I 

CO 

o 
<1- 



M 

H 

O 
M 
hJ 

H 
W 
W 

pc; 

E-" 
CO 



o 



o 

a 

o 

•H 

4-) 

O 

(U 

1-1 

Ed 

Q) 
4J 

CO 
JJ 
CO 

(U 

4J 
•H 

CO 

!-i 
O 

O 

O 

I 

<|- 

o 



< 
I-l 

o 
w 

CO 

o 

M 



o 

OS 



o 

E-" 



in 
o 



M 

o 
w 
a> 

CO 
CO 

o 
I-l 

CO 

o 

pc; 



a 

PL4 
CO 

M 
O 
O 
I-l 

Prf 
CQ 

M 
M 
f^ 

CO 

o 



I 

o 
o 
in 



m 

0) 
(0 
U 



CO 

}-i 

,Q 

•H 

hJ 

O 

4-) 

•o 

•H 

CO 

04 

O 

O 

I 

o 
o 
in 





M 






>. 








M 






4-> 




CO 




<U 




t-< 


(1/ »H 




aj 




T3 




•H 


O O 




C 


Pi 


U 




O 


C 'H 


t-l 


o 


o 


O 






CO !-i 


CO 


A 


o 






«\ 


M ■)-> 


o 


Cu 


pL, 


-o 


4J 


I-l 


P o 


•H 


(U 




o 


d 


(U 


W (U 


Id 


I-l 


*z 


o 


0) 


D 


c ■-< 


<u 


(U 


S 


fc 


^ 


Pn 


h-i W 


S 


E-" 


o 














t-l 


f-l 


CO 


NO 


<f <r 


CM 


in 


1 
o 


CM 

1 
o 


CM 


o 


CN O 


CM 


o 












o 


o 












vO 


NO 













27 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 



</> 



vO 



</> 



<j><n- 



CM 



•co- 



o 
o 

• 
o 
o 
o^ 



</> 



o 
o 

• 

o 
m 

CM 



<o- 



o 
o 

• 
o 



•00- 



o 
o 

• 
o 
o 

CM 



■CO- 



o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


lO 


lO 


o 


o 


ON 


cs 




<M 



CM 



<l> 



■CO- 



<J> 



<ry 



■CO- 



<7^ 


vO 


CM 


O 


CM 


00 


CO 


o 


• 


• 


• 


• 


m 


00 


o 


o 


lO 


in 


I-l 


m 


rH 


CT^ 


CM 


CM 




•« 


•V 






vD 


CN 





■CO- 



■CO- 



o 


o 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


O 


O 


o 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


lO 


m 


o 


m 


CM 


CM 




CM 



o o o 


o o o 


o o o 


o 


o o o 


o o o 


o o o 


o 


• • • 


• • • 


• • • 


• 


o m o 


moo 


o in m 


o 


IT) NO o 


NO vO o 


o CM r--> 


in 


CM ON m 


1-1 CM 


vO 


1-1 



CM CM 



■CO- 



o o o o 
o o o o 

oiooomoooiomo 

mvOOCMvDvOOOCMr^lO 
CNCTNiOi— I i-<CM\0 i-» 

CM CM 



■co- 



OOOOOOOOOO 
OOOOOOOOOO 

• ••••••••• 

oooooomooo 
ooooomr-ooo 
o»nm<fi-t cMi-if-i 

CM 



o o o o o o o 
o o o o o o o 



OOOOOOOOOO 
OOOOOOOOOO 

• ••••••••• 

oooooomooo 
ooooomr^-ooo 
omm<ff-i cMi-)»H 

CM 



o 


o 


o 


r^ 


o 


<!• 


CO 


m 


O 


o 


o 


1^ 


m 


m 


o 


CM 


vO 


m 


o 


CO 


CO 


m 


o 


o 


o 


o 


NO 


CM 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


o 


O 


1-1 


CJN 


m 


m 


<r 


m 


o 


o 


CM 


00 


CM 


00 


o 


vO 


CM 


CO 


vO 


vO 


NO 


CTv 


o 


o 


m 


00 


CJN 


CO 


CM 


CM 


r^ 










i-l 


1-1 


NO 


CM 


m 







CM 



■CO- 



■CO- 



■CO- 



•CO- 



■CO- 



■CO- 

































iO 
(U 

o 

•H 


















CO 
































<U 


















■•-• S 
































CO 


















p! a 






0) 




















CO 




















^ 




(U M 






u 




















C w 






u 














o 




> bO 






•H 




















O -M 






o 












T3 


•H 




M O 






A 






CO 


60 


s 










•H <U O 






ji 








<U 




C 


€ ^ 




!-i 






m 








m 


o 




03 






•U bO <0 






u 








3 




3 


cO 


CO 


>^CU 












^ 


•H 


M 




(U 






& CO J-i 


CO 




o 








bD 




O 


U TS 


C 


(0 




M 


a 






p^ 


IS 


CO 




•H 






•H -P -U 


!-i 










Q) 


CO 




!-i 


bO Pi 


<D 


-a >» 




o 


Qj 






O 


o 


CO 




^ 






!-i (0 CO C 


•H 




1 




• • 


P 


<U 




bO 


O «0 


CO N 


•H (U 






X 






Pi 


s 


M 




CO 






O O CU O 


CO 








CO 


bOhJ 




>» 


u 


O 'H 


.-1 ^ 


(0 


^ 








O 




Jg 




f-l 






CO CU -H U 


o< 




CO 




(U" 


CO 






CO 


CU CO 


•H -M 


o o 


p 


E-« 


15 






>-" 


•V 


§ 




CO 






,Q r-l 


<U 




3 




•H 


(U 


.C 




I-l 


w 


a, 'H 


ffi o 


o 


CO 


a> 






^ 


(U 


o 




CO 






p -a a. 0) 


f^ 


>. 


O 




I-l 


iJ 


JJ 


I-l 


a, 


bO (0 


6 CJ 


X 


(U 


M 


S 


>-« 


Q 


kJ 


o 


CJ 










CO C o< o 




4J 


(U 




a 




3 


I-l 




C CM 


f-l 


a 


CO 




< 


M 


(U 


G 






<u 


o 


<U 


CO 13 p! 


4J 


•H 


C 




cx 


(U 


Prf 


CO 


u 


•H 


I-l ^ 


08 +J 


CO 


cyD 


U-1 


o 


<i 




<a 


z 


CO 


a 


o 


C3 


-o CO CO 


C 


O 


CO 




p 


I-l 




rCI 


d) 


S ** 


O O 


•H <U 


1-1 


<; 


o 






Q 


(U 


o 


Q) 


•H 


a 


O 


?!•*-» C 


<u 


•H 


1-1 


(U 


CO 


4-) 


(1) 


4J 


£ 


E •'-' 


•H 


O (U 


•-< 






tJ 


c/: 


^? 


S 


M 


•H 


+J 


ca 


Xi 


CO ^ o <u 


B 


!-i 


i-« 


bO 




+J 


,Q 


«4-l 


g 


*!;I S 


!i^ C 


(U i-l 


<1> 


H 


<u 


<: 


Pd 


^ 


4J 


H 


U 


1 


u 


Cu 


bO O -U 


a. 


+J 


(U 


CO 


!-i 


•H 


CO 


O 


3 


^ 3 


fa <U 


O. -l-* 


o 


O 


4-) 


M 


u 




P! 


< 


CO 


■U 


3 


Q) 


CO 'H -H (U 


•H 


O 


o 


(U 


<0 


hJ 


PQ 


CO 


CO 


CO P^ 


•-) CO 


CO CO 


CO 


<; 


CO 


pti 


M 


S2 


•H 


w 


1-1 


!-i 


CO 


I-l 


<U (U iw 'H 


3 


0) 


CO 


1-1 


^ 
















•H 




4J 


o 


Q 


cd 


CH 


CO 


CO 


C 


Q) 


3 M M-i CO 


CTi-l 


•H 


•H 


+J 
















s 


p 


CO 


s 


>^ 


S 


S 


u 


CO 


&4 


M 


H 


Q fe O S 


W 


M 


S 


S 


o 


















hJ 




w 


O 




w 




































vO 


o 


o 


s 


CO 


Pm 


o 


pcJ 


T-i 


o 


<!• 


m 


r^ r^ CM CO 


CO 


<r 


NO 


NO 


CM 
















CO 




o 








o 




o 


CM 


cs 


o 


1-1 CO o o 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


o 
















1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


J 


1 


1 


1 


































o 


I-l 


I-l 


o 


I-l 


o 


o 


1-1 


1-< 


































o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


00 


o 


o 


o 


































vO 


vO 


NO 


r~- 


r^ 


00 


00 


00 


00 



































28 



vO 
CO 

• 

eg 



in 



<j> 



o o 
o o 

• • 

o o 

O <f 



<n- 



o o 
o o 

• • 

o o 
o <r 



</> 



o 
o 

• 

in 
m 



</> 



o 
o 

• 
in 

eg 



■co- 



O 
O 

• 

o 
o 
o 

m 



<n- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 

m 



■a>- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 

vO 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 

in 



<f> 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 



<fy 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
in 



•CO- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
in 



<j> 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 

in 



■00- 



o 

o 

• 

o 
o 
o 

in 



■CO- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 

CO 



■co- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 

CO 



■o> 



o 
in 

• 
eg 

00 

o 

CM 



•CO- 



O 

in 

• 

CSJ 
00 

O 
cs 



</> 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 

eg 



■co- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 

eg 



<o- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 

in 



</> 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 

in 



</> 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 

in 



■00- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 

vO 

in 



■CO- 



0^ 
CO 

• 

in 
o 

vO 
00 

eg 
<f 

■co- 



in 
eg 

• 

00 

eg 

in 
i-i 
in 

■co- 



in m t— I 

1^ vO vD 

• • • 
m ON vo 
r^ CO CO 
i-i i-i <1- 



■CO- 



CM 


O r- 


r- 


O 


vO 


O <-< 


i-i 


ON 


• 


• • 


• 


• 


CO 


O 00 


00 


-Cl- 


<r 


O 00 


00 


eg 


00 


<T^ 


C^ 


00 



■CO- 



o 
eg 

• 

00 
00 
vO 

00 



■CO- 



nO 



■CO- 

o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 



•to- 



vO 



■CO- 

o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 



■OO- 



m 



■CO- 

o 
o 

• 

o 
o 

o 

m 
eg 



■co- 



■co- 



■co- 



o 
1^ 



eg 

CO 

cs 



■co- 

o 
o 

• 

o 
o 

CM 

•V 

CO 



■to- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 

o 

CO 



■CO- 

o 
o 

• 

o 
o 
o 

•\ 
CO 



■co- 



o 
o 

• 

o 
o 

00 



CM 
•CO- 

o 

% 



vO 
00 

ON 

r- 

«^ 
00 

1—1 

CO 

■co- 
eg 

CO 



eg 
eg 

<t 
vD 

<r 

■OO- 



























(0 






















03 
















■p 










q 












(U 





















10 






pes 












<u 
















2 




(U 


CO 




04 




g 








4-> 
CO 
















c 




4-> 



g 




a« 




§ 








3 





















Z 


5 








u 








U 
















•H 






1X4 




H 




bO 








H 




CO 












4J 




FJ 






M 




o 












0) 








CO 




CO 







^ 









u 


CO 






CO 




u 








fj 




+J 




•H 


> 




M 




cu 


J-l 






•H 




•p 








CO 





CO 




■P 
CO 


Pd 


hj 


fa 




A 


c 


0) 




u 




•H 








hJ 




(U 




4-» 


CO 


< 


Q 




to •!-> 


■p 


(u :3 (0 




Q) 




'O 

















CO 


w 


M 






0) 3 


u 


P W) <u 




4-» 




a 








h 




•H 






P£i 


CJ 


g 




•H O 


CO 


bO CO 'H 




a> 




0) 


hJ 






M 




I-I 




<U 




M 







.-1 >j 


(U 


qj 0) 1-1 




e 




ex 


<i 






CO 












l-J 


CM 


h-i 




O^ 




<L) hJ O. 




§ 




X 


M 






M 




P-4 




•H 


^ 


CO 


CO 




a, 1-1 


6 


hJ O. 




CJ 




w 


a 


hJ 









^^ 




i^ 


£-• 




CO 




3 <u 


^ 


CO 3 


CO 




<U 




Cd 


<d 




& 




0) 







M 


Z 


I-I 




CO ■P 


X, 


>»- CO 


M 


o 


C! 


f-i 


P-. 


M 


H 


6 


E-i 


J-l 




Oi 


Eti 





S 




c 


I-I 


c a 


I-I 


+j 


•H 


CO 


CO 


CJ 


CO 


q; 


CO 


•H 




^** 


< 


I-I 


2 




U -H 


<u 


O (U J-i 


cd 




1-1 


AJ 




Cxq 


M 


H 


w 


fe 




(U 


CJ 


Ei 







(U [2 


Pu 


a< 2 <u 


M 


-a 


o 


•H 


>- 


CL, 


(2; 




p:S 




CO 


J-l 




^ 


a 




^ 




^ 


E-< 


•H 


CO 


O4 




CO 


W 


(U 


W 


c 


M 


•H 









■p 




■p 




CO 


CO 


CO 


] — 1 




E-" 





E-" 





H 


fe 


H 


ff: 


3 




o 




o 


y 


fu 


O 


U 


H 





Z 




Z 











CJ 










W 








CO 


l-l 


M 





M 





Z 





E-i 


w 


E-* 




CM 




CM 


o 


o 


00 


CM 




Pi 

















\2U 


pci 




CO 


o 




o 




o 


o 


CO 


pc: 


H 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


1 


W 




M 


l-J 


1 






1 


1 






M 


CJ 








1-1 


f-l 


CM 


CM 


s 


:z 


E:j 


<i 


I-I 






o 


o 






H 


w 




















?^ 


w 


<: 


E-< 


o 






o 


o 






<: 


h-J 




















<: 


w 


E-" 





00 






o 


C3^ 






^ 


u 


i-< 


I-I 


t-l 


r-H 


I-I 


r-l 


04 


E-" 


CO 


H 



29 



BUDGET OF THE TOWN OF PELHAM, N.H. 
As submitted by the Budget Committee 



Estimates of Revenue and Expenditures for the Ensuing Year January 1, 1972 

to December 31, 1972 compared with Estimated and Actual Revenue, Appropriations 

and Expenditures of the Previous Year January 1, 1971 to December 31, 1971. 



SOURCES OF REVENUE 

From State: 

Interest & Dividends Tax 
Savings Bank Tax 
Highway Subsidy 
Meals & Rooms Tax 
Training Program 
Reimbursement a/c State Forest 

Lands 
State Radio Grant 
Reimbursement a/c Aid to Disabled 
Town Road Aid Reimbursement 
For Fighting Forest Fires 
Reimbursement a/c Dispatch 
Reimbursement a/c Old Age 

Assistance 
From Local Sources Except Taxes: 
Dog Licenses 
Bus. Licenses, Permits & 

Filing Fees 
Fines & Forfeits, Mun. Court 
Rent of Town Hall and Other 

Buildings 
Interest Received on Taxes & 

Deposits 
Income of Departments 
Motor Vehicle Permit Fees 
Sale of Town Property (Cruiser) 
Bicycle Licenses 
Reimbursement a/c Siren 
Performance bonds Foreclosed 
Proceeds from F/P Note Issue 
Insurance Refund from 1970 
Reimbursement a/c Business Profits 

Tax 
From Local Taxes Other Than 
Property Taxes: 

Poll Taxes from 1970 
Head Tax Commission 
Resident Taxes Retained 
National Bank Stock Taxes 
Yield Taxes 

TOTAL REVENUES EXCEPT PROPERTY TAXES 



Estimated 


Actual 


Estimated 


Revenue 


Revenue 


Revenue 


Previous 


Previous 


Ensuing 


Year 1971 


Year 1971 


Year 1972 


$ 5,168.24 $ 


5,168.24 $ 


5,000.00 


1,444.92 


1,444.92 


1,400.00 


14,223.00 


14,223.42 


28,428.30 


26,365.00 


26,590.20 


26,000.00 




500.00 


500.00 


57.04 


57.04 

1,416.00 

66.16 

162.63 


50.00 




313.72 


100.00 




3,402.00 


5,000.00 


500.69 


500.69 




1,200.00 


1,155.56 


1,000.00 


700.00 


3,535.50 


3,500.00 


1,000.00 


1,344.00 


1,300.00 


200.00 


307.00 


250.00 


6,000.00 


10,904.62 


10,000.00 


1,000.00 


611.35 


600.00 


70,000.00 


75,768.27 


80,000.00 




357.13 


1,000.00 




195.50 


150.00 




1,129.96 






1,804.72 


3,000.00 




57.00 




30,595.26 


30,595.26 

72.00 
812.50 


30,000.00 


16,835.50 


17,149.55 
.50 


18,000.00 


629.00 


628.50 


500.00 


$ 175,918.65 $ 


200,273.94 $ 


215,778.30 


30 







PURPOSES OF EXPENDITURES 



Appropri- 
ations 
Previous 
Year 1971 



Actual Approp. Approp. 

Expenditures Recom. By Submitted 

Previous Budget Comm.w/oRec. of 

Year 1971 1972 Budget Comm. 



General Government: 

Town Officers' Salaries $ 

Town Officers' Expenses 

Election & Registration Expenses 

Municipal Court Expenses 

Expenses Town Hall & Other 
Town Bldgs. 

Reappraisal of Property 

Employees Retirement & 
Social Security 

Social Security Special 

Microfilm Special 

Town Hall Special 

Ditto Machine Special 

Town Equipment Special 
Protection of Persons & Property: 

Dispatch Service Special 

Police Department 

Fire Department 

Care of Trees 

Insurance 

Planning & Zoning 

Damage by Dogs 

Dog Officer 

Damages & Legal Expenses 

Civil Defense 

Police Communications Special 

Police Walkie-Talkie Special 

Police Radar Special 

Police/Fire Building Special 

Police/Fire Building Site Special 

Police/Fire Equipment Special 

Fire Truck Special 

Fire Equipment Special 

Regional Planning Special 

Willow Street Park Special 

Municipal Planning Special 

Soils Map Special 

Land Purchase Special 

Town Engineer Special 

Civil Defense Special 
Health: 

Health Department 100.00 

Vital Statistics 125.00 

Town Dump 5,000.00 

Salem Mental Health Special 2,000.00 

M.V. Health Service Special 2,500.00 



6,625.00 

24,694.00 

1,200.00 

1,250.00 

1,715.00 
3,000.00 

3,910.30 



1,790.00 



9,855.00 

59,064.30 

13,008.50 

200.00 

9,350.00 

1,110.00 

250.00 

2,300.00 

3,500.00 

1,065.00 

5,181.60 

99,500.00 
6,000.00 

17,000.00 

818.10 
2,600.00 



9.639.42 6,100.00 
25,340.24 28,353.00 1,200.00 

1.382.43 1,015.00 155.00 
1,150.00 1,000.00 



1,877.49 
3.517.26 

3,783.00 
1,599.00 



9,828.00 
58,922.34 
12,190.89 

6,887.49 
933.77 

2,087.78 

2,435.91 

934.05 

1,998.60 

900.00 



811.00 
2,600.00 



100.00 

132.75 

6,249.96 

2,000.00 

2,500.00 



3,262.00 
3,500.00 

4,873.00 

200.00 
1,700.00 

399.00 
1,000.00 

15,837.00 
69,854.50 
12,565.00 

10,329.00 
1,736.00 

250.00 
2,621.00 
5,000.00 

125.00 
2,500.00 



3,000.00 

6,050.00 
1,515.25 

2,500.00 
1,294.70 
14,500.00 
2,100.00 
1,200.00 

100.00 

135.00 

8,375.00 

3,300.00 

2,500.00 



5,076.36 



1,500.00 



31 



Highways and Bridges: 








Town Maintenance-Summer $ 


21,000.00 $ 


23,010.93 $ 


11,250.00 $ 


Town Maintenance-Winter 


35,000.00 


48,975.04 


45,000.00 


Street Lighting 


6,500.00 


5,297.07 


8,350.00 


General Expenses of Highway Dept, 


2,500.00 


1,420.86 




Town Road Aid Special 


1,283.32 


1,283.32 


1,119.44 


Snow Plow Special 






3,200.00 


Res ea ling 


20,000.00 


20,122.69 


23,000.00 


Road Signs 


- 15.00 






Willow St, Bridge Special 






9,000.00 


Libraries 


14,373.00 


14,373.00 


16,073.00 


Library Special 






39,995.00 


Library Phase Special 






3,286.00 


Public Welfare: 








Town Poor 


2,500.00 


6,958.86 


6,000.00 


Old Age Assistance 


1,200.00 


2,210.32 


2,900.00 


Patriotic Purposes: 








Memorial Day 


250.00 


250.00 


250.00 


Soldiers Aid 


50.00 




50.00 


Recreation: 








Recreation Commission 


8,688.20 


7,843.62 


11,155.00 


Parks and Playgrounds 


200.00 


200.00 


200.00 


Public Service Enterprises: 








Cemeteries 


7,000.00 


6,988.17 


5,000.00 


Water Study Special 


25,000.00 


5,824.90 


7,500.00 


Electric Special 






15,000.00 


Debt Service: 








Interest on Debt: 








On Temporary Loans 


3,200.00 


2,321.70 


3,000.00 


On Long Term Notes 






2,082.^ 


Principal of Debt: 








Long Term Notes 






12,000.00 


Capital Outlay: 








Town Construction (Roads) 


6,000.00 


8,917.10 


17,000.00 


Payment to Capital Reserve Funds 


3,000.00 


3,000.00 


5,000.00 


Teen Recreation Special 






5,600.00 


Deficit Appropriation 








State Tax Coimiiission 


21,800.00 







TOTAL EXPENDITURES AND 
APPROPRIATIONS 



$ 464,221.32 $ 318,798.96 $428,605.39 $51,126.36 



Marianne Thompson, Chairman 

Daniel Atwood Jr. Lawrence Hince 

Donald Brock John Lavallee 

Austin Burns James Powers 

Robert Fisher James White 

Robert Fletcher Lawrence Ormsby 
BUDGET COMMITTEE 



32 



ANNUAL REPORTS 

of the 

School Board, Treasurer, Auditors, Budget Coiranittee, 
Superintendent and Department Heads 

of the 

SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PELHAM, N. H. 

for the 

Year Ending June 30, 1971 

DISTRICT OFFICERS 

MODERATOR Alex Vitale 

CLERK Dorothy Hill 

SCHOOL BOARD 

Philip R. Currier, Chrm. 1972, Mrs. Grace O'Hearn, 1974, Clerk 
Donald Brock, 1973 

TREASURER Dorothy Hill 

AUDITORS State Auditors 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS Peter G. Dolloff 

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT Frank A. Kaf fel 

PRINCIPAL Harold T. Martin 

PRINCIPAL David Kelley 



71 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTEOT)ENT OF SCHOOLS 

To The School Board and Citizens of Pelham: 

I submit this report after having served only several months as 
your Superintendent of Schools, although I have served as Assistant 
Superintendent for the past five years. As you may be well aware 
Supervisory Union #27 was reorganized effective July 1st 1971. The 
towns of Bedford and Merrimack which were formerly part of Super- 
visory Union #27 now comprise the new Supervisory Union #26 while the 
town of Windham joined Hudson, Pelham, and Litchfield to comprise the 
new Supervisory Union #27. The new organizational framework has 
resulted in a move efficient and manageable unit. We now serve some 
5200 children instead of the nearly 10,000 youngsters that comprised 
the former Union #27. We are also geographically more compact re- 
sulting in less travel time and increased services to all of the 
communities involved. 

If one were to identify Pelham' s paramount problem it would have 
to be "space". That concern will be partially solved with the opening 
of the new addition to the E. G. Sherburne School during or prior to 
the coming school year. The new addition will have 16 teaching 
stations, a new teacher's room and an Instructional Materials Center 
to service the entire school. The building Committee and the School 
Board are to be commended for their foresight in creating teaching 
stations that are flexible permitting their use either as conventional 
classrooms or as various sized instructional areas. The instructional 
area will not only be capable of being adapted to groups of varying 
sizes but will permit differing types of space-use changes. With the 
opening of this additional all of grades 1-4 will be housed in the 
E. G. Sherburne School permitting improved coordination of the primary 
program while the remaining grades will be housed in the Memorial 
School. 

However, with one problem solved another more pressing problem 
has presented itself with the expiration of the Alvirne contract in 
June of 1974. In view of the fact that Hudson has indicated it will 
not renew the contract, Pelham is faced with the possibility of having 
to build its own high school. This certainly is an awesome burden at 
this particular point in time. However, if one were to consider that 
in 1974 Pelham' s tuition liability to Hudson would probably exceed a 
half million dollars and that the total transportation costs, a good 
portion of which are necessary to transport students to Alvirne High 
School, will be well in excess of $100,000.- the idea begins to seem 
more feasible. The Community would definetly give serious consideration 
to the report of the High School study Committee. 



72 



The most significant item in the annual budget continues to be 
professional salaries. However the quality of the educational program 
is in direct proportion to the quality of the teaching staff regardless 
of the facilities or equipment. Good teachers are the nucleus of the 
instructional program and without good teachers there would cease to be 
a viable program. If we build stability into our instructional staff 
while continuing to improve the quality of the staff our entire program 
will continue to improve and expand. 

This year for the first time we are joining with Supervisory Union 
#10 (Derry, Londonderry, and Auburn) and Supervisory Union #26 (Bedford, 
Merrimack) to form a Tri-Union cooperative for the purpose of bidding 
instructional supplies. Through this combined effort we will be bidding 
supplies for approximately 15,000 children instead of 5,000 children 
which should result in substantial savings to all of the communities 
involved. We hope this will be just the beginning of regional coopera- 
tive efforts in the business area. 

Finally, I would like to stress the importance of the home to the 
total educational program. It is imperative that there remain a clear 
line of communication between school and home at all times. Although 
specific days are set aside for parent- teacher conferences, parents are 
encouraged to contact the school at any time that they have a question 
or a concern relative to their child's progress. Conversely, teachers 
will be encouraged to contact parents when they feel a cooperative 
effort is necessary to solve a specific problem. 

In conclusion I would like to thank the School Board, Mr. Martin, 
Mr, Kelley and the entire school staff for their unfailing cooperation 
and finally the citizens of Pelham for their commitment to excellence 
in the total educational program. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Peter G. Dolloff 
Superintendent of Schools 



73 



REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



Mr. Peter G. Dolloff 
Superintendent of Schools 
Pelham, New Hampshire 

Dear Mr. Dolloff: 

Enrollment growth in the Pelham Schools has put an increasing 
demand on the present facilities. With the new addition at Sherburne, 
this will alleviate the problem at both Memorial and Sherburne schools 
for the time being. 

Once the facilities are completed, then a concentrated effort can 
be made to analyze the teaching environment and improve the teaching 
and learning process where necessary. 

During the current year, we found it necessary to replace 13 
teachers. The following is a list of new personnel: 



NAME 


SUBJECT 


Bee ley. Donna 


Grade 4 


Borry, Betty 


Phys . Ed . 


Bragdon, Gerald 


Math 


Dickinson, Katharine 


Grade 5 


Fulton, Darcy 


Guidance 


Greene, Leo 


Assist. Prin. 


Ilg, Pamela 


Eng. 


Kelley, David 


Principal 


Moore, Marjorie 


Grade 2 


Psaledas, Arthur 


Phys . Ed . 


Ryan, Alison 


Grade 1 


Sirois, Robert 


Rgad. 


Tucker , Anne 


Art 



Univ. of Mass. 
Keene State 
Farmington State 
Univ. of Maine 
Russell Sage 
Boston College 
Lowell State 
Salem State 
Boston Univ. 
Univ. of N.H. 
Boston Univ. 
Spring Hill College 
Dennison 



B.A. 

B.ED. 

B.S.ED. 

B.A. 

B.S. 

B.S. 

B.A. 

B.S. & M.A, 

B.S. 

B.S. 

B.S.ED. 

A.B. 

Degree 



Respectfully submitted, 

Frank A. Kaffel 
Assistant Superintendent 



74 



REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL - PELHAM MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

January, 1972 

Mr. Peter G. Dolloff 
Superintendent of Schools 
Pelham School District 
Pelham, New Hampshire 

Dear Mr. Dolloff: 

We began our school year with several basic objectives clearly in 
mind: (1) to re-evaluate and strengthen our educational program so that 
each of the major disciplines are scheduled and taught to each of our 
students every day; (2) To work towards individualization of instruct- 
ion so that pupils may be stimulated in a program of learning activities in 
which they participate; and (3) To inculcate a feeling of patriotism in 
the minds and hearts of the students towards a better community, a better 
state and nation, through discussion, instruction and student body 
activities. 

To change the climate of the educational environment within our 
school seemed imperative due to many societal changes. Increasing know- 
ledge, environmental and race problems, technological advances, are to 
name but a few of the influences requiring modification in the way we 
design our learning environment. 

The student, like the scientist, attempts to gather data, classify 
this data, and make judgements from hypothesis. The question of how does 
the child learn best - and by what means - seems to bring up an old 
proverb: "I hear and I forget - I see and I remember - I do and I 
understand. 

This past year we have held a number of instructional workshops and 
curriculum meetings to upgrade the curriculum in our school. Meetings 
were held on a regularly scheduled basis to improve our reading program. 
In fact, the entire curriculum is being re-evaluated and systematized for 
instruction. 

Testing on a group and individual basis has been accomplished on a 
regularly scheuled program in order to ensure the proper placement of our 
Pelham Memorial students. The guidance program is a continuing one built 
on sympathetic and warm human relationships between students and teachers. 

Music and art programs have been influential in giving to our students 
an understanding of humanistic aesthetic values which carry on to 
adulthood. 



75 



Meetings scheduled several times each month are carried on in the 
area of health education with emphasis being placed on developing a curr- 
iculum which would incorporate the problem of drug abuse. 

Extra-curricular activities have created much school spirit and 
student involvement. Programs, such as the Chorus, Dramatics Club, 
Cheer leading. Newspaper Reporting, Poster Making, Art Club, Chess, 
Fashion Show, Science Activities, Intramural Sport such as football, 
street hockey and basketball, Interscholastic Sports (including boys 
and girls basketball and baseball) help to make a well-rounded after 
school activities program. 

The Student Council contributes to Memorial School in the area 
of student government and holds social events and dances. It has committed 
itself to many projects including building an outdoor classroom, buying 
basketball uniforms - both boys and girls - and baseball uniforms. We 
are extremely proud of this group of dedicated girls and boys. 

This past year has produced a great amount of personal and 
professional satisfaction, due primarily to the professional attain- 
ment of staff and teaching personnel. The cooperation of the cust- 
odians, lunchroom workers and teacher aides, along with instructional 
and professional staff, has been outstanding. I wish to pay special 
tribute to my assistant, Mr. Leo Greene, for his unfailing and un- 
tiring efforts in helping to make this school year a smoothly run 
operation. 

In closing, I wish to extend my appreciation and thanks to the ' 
School Board and to the Superintendent of Union #27 Schools, Mr. Peter 
Dolloff, and his entire staff for the kindness, helpful consideration 
and understanding of the School needs of the Pelham School District. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harold T. Martin 

Principal 

Pelham Memorial School 



76 



REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL 

January, 1972 

Mr. Peter Dolloff 
Superintendent of Schools 
Pelham School District 
Pelham, New Hampshire 03076 

Dear Mr. Dolloff, 

The following is the annual report of the E. G. Sherburne School's 
educational program for the school year 1971-1972. 

During the past year the staff of the E. G. Sherburne School have been 
preparing for the opening of a sixteen-room addition, adjacent to the exist- 
ing building. This new addition is envisioned as housing four classes each 
of grades 1-4 in an open concept, team-teaching situation. The classroom 
areas will surround a materials resource center which will act as library 
and audio-visual center for the entire school. 

In-service workshops, films and school visitations have all been geared 
to acquainting teachers with techniques of small group and individualized 
instruction. Highlights of this program have been the visitation of all 
teachers to the Highland Goffs Falls School and the East Rochester Elementary 
Schools. On January 28 a workshop conducted by Dr. Anderson of Harvard Uni- 
versity and Dr. Indrisano of Boston University was held in the techniques of in- 
individualized instruction. 

Staff development is one of our most important concerns. In addition 
to the work being done to individualize instruction there is constant evalu- 
ation and implementation of new curricula. Science and social studies cur- 
riculums were finished last year and have been implemented this year. Super- 
visory Union #27 is now engaged in a cooperative effort to improve our read- 
ing instruction. Mrs. Mary Quinn and Mrs. Elizabeth Shelley are the building 
representatives on this committee. 

Community volunteers are being incorporated into the educational pro- 
gram in ever-increasing numbers. At the present time there are six volun- 
teer librarians, six teacher aides and five home helpers. This parental 
support of our school has enabled us to greatly expand our services to the 
students. Additional help is still needed and parents are continually urged 
to join our staff. 

In line with our program of increased school/community relationships, 
the staff of the E. G. Sherburne School originated a program for parents of 
5-7 year old children which was held on February 1, 2 and 3. This program 



77 



was designed to instruct parents in how they may create a climate for learn- 
ing in their home and how they may help their child improve his basic read- 
ing skills. This development was seen as a natural outgrowth of our exist- 
ing readiness classes. We feel that the needs for community education and 
involvement in the pre-school learning situation was improved by our course 
of instruction. Hopefully this development will become a permanent program 
for Pelham residents. 

In keeping with our policy of individualized development the school pro- 
vides a large variety of services designed to complement the academic program. 

Mrs. Joyce Hamel has been assigned as a full-time nurse for the E. G. 
Sherburne School and St. Patrick's School. During the year medical and den- 
tal clinics were offered to most of our students. In addition to her regu- 
lar duties of first aid, record keeping and health testing Mrs. Hamel has 
been developing a program of preventive medicine for our students. 

Children with speech defects receive weekly therapy under the care of 
Mr, David Meltzer. His record of success is exceptional. Most children are 
able to stop therapy at the end of two years. 

The guidance and testing program is under the direction of Mrs. Darcy 
Fulton, Although counseling of children at the primary level is not common, 
the need for more in-depth work at this level is apparent. 

There are several areas of concern which should be investigated for the 
1972-1973 school year: 

1, The school district should consider having diagnostic testing in the 
fall, rather than achievement testing, 

2o Additional personnel are needed. An additional guidance counselor, 

administrative assistant and several teacher aides are considered mini- 
mal. It would be worth investigating hiring 3 or 4 teacher aides in 
lieu of hiring a professional staff member. 

3. In-service course work will have to reach a very high level if the 
implementation of open concept education is to take place within the 
next several years. 

4, Open concept education and team teaching will require some amounts of 
release time instruction for planning purposes. 

The future appears bright for children attending the E. G. Sherburne 
School. The staff is interested in their student's welfare and in develop- 
ing improved teaching techniques. Space limitations seem to be temporarily 
solved, although the completion date of the new addition is not firm. 



78 



In closing I wish to thank you Mr. Dolloff, Mr. Kaffel, the School 
Board and the people of Pelham for their generous support and cooperation. 
I wish particularly to thank the staff of the E. G. Sherburne School for all 
their efforts in behalf of the children of Pelham. 

Respectfully submitted. 



David C. Kelley, Principal 
E. G. Sherburne School 




U • , II 1 

F«,,l K,....|l «, M„»|;, t. , i, ,, , .,, ^„,, |,,,| ,,, , 

>■■■ ' \—--l: ^.> I., .' ■ M,,,.,, |,.,| ,, 

"■'■'" * ' "<•■■ ' ' i -. ■ • • M-.i.'li l-',l 

'"'»' >>"lli-i" S. Mr,.|„, ,,., ,[., , ,.|„,_, .M.,,,1,, ;,M,.^ ,„ ,„ 

I'M.I Ft.l„k \i. W„„ll,„,,, (,„ ,|„. ,,,„. |s,),l -„ ,„, 

I'«i.l KimbnII J. t h.i|.liii, f«r tin. your cmlins Mnr.ii 

l«M ■ fUl -ul 

n.t;, .',11 
sritooi, inoj«t;v. 

Puiit (ifnirui' S. IliKliT, ■|'ii»«iif,.i- ,.( S<li.>i.l l!,.,ti,l. I, mi, 

itf|,ri,|.iiali,.ii till «rii.,,il» r.ir 1 (till »!li.i; mi 

IMernrf foii.l .,f IH'M I .1 nl 

Uog fiiiii) of IN.iU |i:i cm 

(i.ni 41 
HVH<M>t^n<tti»im. 

PnW }. ,V Wi.»lmiiii, , li,„i 1111,1. „f ...iminiiU'i., for tnmv 

<,f u-hm 1,,..™ .I.«<1 Ittll, lial.ii,™ „r l.UI uf 

!«t»ii , tia SI 

(itnii);.. S, liiitl/i,Tl<'iniii,,.r ,,f ,-i>lu,,J ilum.l, ijai. 

an.-i- <.fi<|,|„o(, 11.111411, i.f ixliti |o 31 

< h lioll^r, i([i|.i.,|,rii,u.ii, ur IHtfi , , 2W( IHI 




A SCHEDULE of salaries of town and school 
and school officials for 1892. 



79 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL NURSE 

Mr. Peter Dolloff January, 1972 

Superintendent of Schools 
Pelham School District 
Pelham, New Hampshire 03076 

Dear Mr. Dolloff, 

The following is my annual report as school nurse for E.G. Sherburne 
and St. Patrick Schools for the year 1970-1971. 

At Sherburne School all third grade students, children new to the 
school system in Grade 2 and first grade students who had not been examined 
by their family physician, as urged at pre-school registration, were given 
physical examinations by Dr. V. Tripathi. The total was 104 physicals. 

This year's N.H. Tuberculin Skin Testing Program was offered to 
faculty and staff of both schools. Nineteen persons participated, all test- 
ing negatively. 

In March 1971, our local dentist, Dr. A. Montminy visited 14 class- 
rooms at the Sherburne School giving much needed dental health instruction. 
I wish to offer my sincere appreciation to him for donating his valuable 
time to the children. 

The N. H. Public Health German Measles Clinic was held on March 31, 
1971, A total of 189 children were immunized at both schools. Dr. V. Tripathi 
administered the vaccine with the assistance of local volunteer nurses. 

Routine vision and hearing screenings were carried out on children in 
grades 1, 3, 5 and 7. A total of 14 vision defects and 12 hearing defects 
were found and referred to the parents for follow-up. 

Head inspections were carried out twice, in fall and spring. A total 
of 18 children were found with pediculosis and all cases were corrected. 

Thirty-nine home visits were made for various health reasons. 

Each child is weighed and measured yearly and recorded on the child's 
confidential health record along with other pertinent medical data. 

There were 1286 visits made to the Health Room for first aid, consulta- 
tions and a variety of health problems. 

Conferences were held with parents, teachers and health agencies in an 
effort to bring better health and more understanding of health problems. 

In conclusion I would like to thank Mrs. Marilyn Boland, Pelham' s Visiting 
Nurse for her assistance in coordinating pupil health services. Also my thanks 
to the faculty, parents and volunteer nurses who were responsible for the 
success of this school year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joyce Hamel, R. N. 

80 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL NURSE 

January 1972 



Mr. Peter G. Dolloff 
Superintendent of Schools 
Pelham School District 
Pelham, New Hampshire 

Dear Mr. Dolloff: 

Following is a report of the Pelham Schools health program during the 
school year 1970-71. 

During September and October, Dr. Vinod Tripathi physically examined 
346 students in grades 3, 5 and 7 as well as those new students to the 
school district. Thirty eight pupils were referred to parents for 
specific medical or dental defects. 

Two clinics were held during March in cooperation with State Health 
Agencies: 

The N.H. T.B. Association conducted tuberculin skin testing with 54 
school employees and bus drivers participating. Nine positive reactors 
were followed through with chest x-rays and physician's reports. 

A second Rubella (German Measles) clinic was held for those students 
in grades 3-6 who had not been immunized at the first clinic. Dr. 
Tripathi administered this vaccine to 98 pupils. State Public Health 
Representative, Arthur Von Biskirk, Marilyn Boland, R.N. , Florence Porter, 
R.N., and Anna Horskin R.N. assisted. 

Scheduled health classes were initiated this year on a weekly basis 
to all sixth grade students. Topics discussed included mental, physical, 
public and dental health; nutrition; community and home safety. A 
programmed first aid course was included in the health program. Thirty 
two students, having passed oral and written tests received American Red 
Cross Junion First Aid Certificates. Invited professional speakers during 
the year included Dr. Andre Montminy, Roland Maheu and Miss Betty Borry. 
My sincere thanks for the assistance rendered by their services. 

Communicable disease reports were sent on a monthly basis to Alton 
Hodgman, Health Officer. 

Parent, Teacher, Administrative and State Health conferences amounted 
to 842 during the year. 



81 



Vision and hearing screening of 3rd, 5th and 7th grade students 
totaled 1,219. Defects were reported to parents and medical attention 
was sought. Reports of treatment and recommendaions were returned to 
this office. 

Pupils visited the health room for various reasons including 
conferences, heights and weights, head inspections and first aids. These 
totaled 2,557. 

Home visits during the year totaled 22. 

Health services for children, birth to six years, was entirely 
assumed by the Merrimack Valley Home Health Care Association and its' 
local representative Mrs, Marilyn Boland. This agency's efforts have been 
of great assistance in coordinating school and community health services. 

In closing, I wish to thank the parents, the staff of Memorial, 
Sherburne and St. Patricks Schools and the Superintendent and his staff 
for their cooperation and assistance during this school year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

June Groele, R. N. 
School Nurse 



82 



REPORT OF THE GUIDANCE DIRECTOR 

January, 1972 

Mr. Peter G. Dolloff 
Superintendent of Schools 
Pelham School District 
Pelham, New Hampshire 

Dear Mr. Dolloff: 

Please find enclosed the first annual report relative to the Guid- 
ance program for the Pelham School District. 

Priorities focus on individual and group counseling; some of which 
is directed toward a referral and screening process. Teachers, Adminis- 
trators, and parents are consulted as much as possible. There is an 
organized system wide testing program given in the Spring and Fall. 
These scores are interpretated to the teachers, administrators, parents, 
and students. Recently, a parent counseling group was initiated. Com- 
munications have continued to be made with the available guidance facil- 
ities. The Greater Salem Mental Health Association confers with the 
counselor once a month. 

Due to the student population (approximately 1350) one could not 
expect the Guidance program to be anything but a token effort. It is 
of great concern that the quality of the Guidance services be improved 
through adoption of the following recommendations: 

1. Two additional counselors. National standards recommend 
a ratio of 400 students to one counselor. 

2. School Psychologist to be employed on a union wide basis 
for purposes of individual testing and counsultation. 

3. A careful evaluation of the present testing program. 

4. Expansion of pupil personnel services to include: 

a. teacher for the emotionally distrubed students, 

b. expansion of the special learning diffuculty 
program, 

c. a pupil personnel coordinator. 

5. Director of Federal and State funding (union-wide). 

6. Guidance Secretary. 

In closing, it must be understood that decisions need immediate 
action regarding the above recommendations so that the Pelham School 
District can meet the individual students needs. 

^ Respectfully submitted, 

Darcy Fulton 
Guidance Director 



83 



REPORT OF THE AREA PLANNING COMMITTEE 



TO: Members of the School Board and Citizens of Pelham 

The Pelham AREIA Planning Committee (James O'Hearn, Donald Brock, 
and Fredrick Bischoff) joined with the Windham Cooperative School 
Study Committee last April to form the Pelham- Windham Planning Board. 
Members from Windham consisted of Robert Skinner, Marion Dinsmore, and 
George Armstrong, Mr. Skinner was elected Chairman of the Planning 
Board, Mr. Bischoff was elected Vice Chairman, and Mrs. Dinsmore was 
elected Secretary Treasurer. Representatives from each town were 
appointed to various advisory committees to study assigned areas and 
make recommendations to the Planning Board. Serving fromPelham are: 

a) Curriculum Advisory Committee: Connie Case, Alice McEdward, 
Harold Mooney, Linda Everhard, and Mark Nickerson. 

b) Site and Building Advisory Committee : Frank Foisie, Michael 
McLlarky, Arthur Hanlon, Churchill Rood, William Lappen, and 
Stephen Hanlon. 

c) Finance Advirosy Committee : Charles Hamblest, Richard Craven 
and Richard Gilcreast. 

d) Publicity Committee : Joanne Hamblett, Marianne Thompson, 

The above named individuals and their Windham counterparts deserve a 
vote of appreciation for their diligent efforts in striving to arrive 
at recommendations that are best for both towns. 

The Board established a regular bi-monthly meeting schedule and 
has followed this schedule faithfully, meeting on the first and third 
Thursday of each month since last April. 

At this time it is the general concensus of the Pelham Advisory 
Committee, and the unanimous recommendation of the Pelham AREA Planning 
Committee that Pelham direct its planning toward the establishment of an 
AREA High School with Pelham as the receiving district and Windham and/or 
Litchfield as the sending district. We recognize the fact that such a 
plan must receive the endorsement and support of all districts concerned 
and in the event that no potential sending district approves the plan, 
then it is our recommendaion that Pelham establish its own high school. 
Some of the considerations that led to our stand are presented below. 

1. Enrollment figures are currently exceeding those projected by 
C.E.F.S. less than a year ago. It would appear that a 1200 
student regional high school ( Pelham- Windham) would be filled 
within a few years of its opening. At that time a second 
vocational or academic high school would have to be financed, 
thus wiping out any tax dollars savings realized as a result 
of a coop, venture vs. a Pelham High School. 



84 



1. Enrollment figures are currently exceeding those projected by 
C.E.F.S. less than a year ago. It would appear that a 1200 student 
regional high school (Pelham- Windham) would be filled within a few 
years of its opening. At that time a second vocational or academic 
high school would have to be financed, thus wiping out any tax dollars 
savings realized as a result of a coop- venture vs. a Pelham High 
School. 

2. The AREA Plan would permit a limited time period of enrollment 
by the sending district (s) (present contracts permit time limits of 
three years). As districts grow, sending districts may decide to 
build their own high schools and the AREA agreements can be allowed 

to run out, thus freeing the districts involved. 

3. A cooperative school district agreement must be entered into 
with the realization that it is, for all practical purposes, a permanent 
binding contract that will be extremely difficult to dissolve, should 
the need arise. 

4. This committee has already been made aware of the fact that many 
Pelham residents would not consider entering into a cooperative agree- 
ment with Windham if the Regional High School was to be erected within 
the boundaries of Windham, and vice versa. 

5. General observations indicate that the chances of both school 
districts agreeing upon the articles o,f agreement are slim at this time, 

6. Presently, both Pelham and Windham are in the same supervisory 
union. This fact would seem to indicate that Windham would have some 
degree of representation on the school board through the district's 
school superintendent, 

7. In the future, when Windham may have its own high school, it 
would seem logical for the two towns to explore the feasibility of 
unofficial cooperative ventures in the elementary or secondary schools. 
Specialized teachers may then become affordable if each district were 
to underwrite only a fraction of the individual's salary. 

The Pelham Committee has met as the Planning Board |and has 
presented these thoughts. It has also recommended that' the Planning 
Board continue with its study of the cooperative plan' so that a final 
report can be drafted for presentation to the two towns. It is the 
Pelham Committee's view that the town should be informed regarding all 
reasonable alternatives, however the Committee's recommendation stands 
with the planning of an AREA or Pelham, Mgh School. 

While concurring with the general philosophy as expressed above, I 
would feel remiss if I did not state my firm belief that as a practical 



85 



matter I feel it most remote that Pelham and Windham will join together 
in either a cooperative or AREA venture in time to meet Pelham' s needs. 
I therefore recommend that the Pelhara-AREA Planning Committee withdraw 
from the Pe Iham- Windham Planning Board and that its full attention be 
directed toward planning a Pelham High School. I further recommend 
that an article for planning money be placed in the March school district 
warrant and a second article authorizing a bond issue for the con- 
struction of a Pelham High School be placed in the warrant with the 
intent of recessing until June for action on the latter. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Donald Brock 

James O'Hearn 

Frederick Bischoff, Chairman 





V 
1: 




\ 




\ 

\ 


■ V 




. \ 
\ 




/ 
/ 






/,-,■ • 


/ / 




/ / 

/ - 


^/r//aJ. . Jy ,r, ,>,. ; / 


/ 

/ ' 

/ /r 
1 /* 







.. ■ /• 


//' ^ 


/ ^ / 


//.'yA 


-' 4-^''^ 


/i^ .0 - 


-^'J ^^J 


/^^, ^. 




/. ^' 


J ^o 


y/.^. 


// yj 


X ^' 




/. y 


/ y 'j ^ 


s\/^ 


-^jy/ J^> 


J>jj < 



IN ADDITION to showing taxes assessed, the 1858 
property inventory indicates various aspects of each 
household, including the number of polls, or those 
eligible to vote. 



86 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT TREASURER 

for the 

MEMORIAL SCHOOL ADDITION 

Fiscal Year July 1, 1970 to June 30, 1971 

Cash on Hand July 1, 1970 $23,538.77 

Received from all Other Sources $ 403.75 

TOTAL RECEIPTS 403.75 

Total Amount Available for Fiscal Year 23,942.52 

Less School Board Orders Paid 10,257.52 



Balance on Hand June 30, 1971 $13,685.00 

July 9, 1971 Dorothy Hill 

District Treasurer 



AUDITORS' CERTIFICATE 

This is to certify that we have examined the books, vouchers, 
bank statements and other financial records of the treasurer of the 
school district of Pelham of which the above is a true summary for 
the fiscal year ending July 30, 1971 and find them correct in all 
respects. 



August 23, 1971 Robert E. Sanderson 

Auditor 



87 



DIVISION OF MUNICIPAL ACCOUNTING 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



CONCORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



November 23, 1971 



SUMMARY OF FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 

The School Board 
Pelham School District 
Pelham, New Hampshire 

Gentlemen: 

Submitted herewith is the report of an examination and audit of 
the Pelham School District for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1971, 
which was made by this Division in accordance with the vote of the 
District. Exhibits as hereafter listed are included as part of the 
report. 

SCOPE OF AUDIT 
Included in the examination and audit were the accounts and records 
of the School Board, School District Treasurer, School Lunch Program 
and Memorial School Activities Fund, 

FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

Comparative Balance Sheets ; (Exhibit A-1) 

Comparative Balance Sheets as of June 30, 1970 and June 30, 1971, 
are presented in Exhibit A-1. As indicated therein, the Net Debt of the 
School District decreased by $62,510.43, from $933,555.83 to $871,045.40 
during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1971. 

Analysis of Change in Financial Condition ; (Exhibit A-2) 

An analysis of the change in financial condition of the School 
District during the fiscal year is made in Exhibit A-2, with the factors 
which caused the change indicated therein. 

These were as follows: 



Decreases in Net Debt ; 
Net Budget Surplus 
Bonds Paid During Year 
Increase in Petty Cash 



$19,904.60 

72,000.00 

3.37 



$91,907.97 



88 



Increase in Net Debt ; 

Surplus Used to Reduce School Tax $29,397.54 

Net Decrease in Net Debt $62,510.43 



Comparative Statements of Appropriations and Expenditures - Estimated and 
Actual Revenues : (Exhibits A-3 and A-4) 

Comparative statements of appropriations and expenditures, estimated 
and actual revenues for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1971, are presented 
in Exhibits A-3 and A-4. As indicated by the Budget Summary (Exhibit A-4), 
a net unexpended balance of appropriations of $5,683.75 plus a revenue 
surplus of $14,220.85 resulted in a net budget surplus of $19,904.60. 

TREASURER 

General Fund ; 

Classified Statement of Receipts and Expenditures ; (Exhibit B-1) 

A summary statement of general fund receipts and expenditures for 
the fiscal year ended June 30, 1971, made up in accordance with the un- 
iform classification of accounts is included in Exhibit B-1. Proof of 
the Treasurer's balance as of June 30, 1971 is indicated in Exhibit B-2. 

Building Fund ; (Exhibit B-3) 

A statement of the Memorial School Addition building fund account 
for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1971, is presented in Exhibit B-3. 

School Tax Account ; (Exhibit E) 

A statement of the School Tax account with the Town of Pelham is 
presented in Exhibit E. As indicated therein, at June 30, 1971 the 
School District had received from the Town the total amount of the 1970- 
71 School Tax of $940,337.14, plus a prepayment of 1971-72 School Tax of 
$19,535.00, which represents a 1970-71 deficiency appropriation voted at 
the 1971 School District Meeting. 

Indebtedness : (Exhibit F) 

A statement of the outstanding bonded indebtedness of the School 
District as of June 30, 1971, showing annual debt service requirements if 
contained in Exhibit F. 

GENERAL COMMENTS 



Current Surplus : 

The current surplus (excess of total assets over current liabilities) 



89 



decreased by $9,489.57, from $29,444.17 to $19,954.60, during the fiscal 
year ended June 30, 1971, as shown herewith: 

June 30, 1970 June 30, 1971 

Total Assets $56,265.58 $37,117.95 

Current Liabilities 26,821.41 17,163.35 

Current Surplus $29,444.17 $19,954.60 



Manifests Require Signature of School Board : 

Every manifest issued to the Treasurer authorizing payments must 
bear the signatures of a majority of the School Board. This requirement 
applies to payroll manifests as well as to vendor manifests. 

Conclusion : 

The provisions of Chapter 184 of the Laws of 1955, require that the 
auditors' summary of findings and recommendations (letter of transmittal) 
shall be published in the next annual report of the School District. 
Publication of the Exhibits contained in the audit report is optional 
at the discretion of the School Board. 

We extend our thanks to the officials of the Pelham School District 
for their assistance during the course of the audit. 

Yours very truly, 

Frederick E. Laplante 
Director 
DIVISION OF MUNICIPAL ACCOUNTING 
STATE TAX COMMISSION 



90 



PELHAM SCHOOL DISTRICT 
Statement of Bonded Indebtedness, Showing 
Annual Maturities of Principal and Interest 
As of June 30, 1971 



Amount of Original Issue 
D^te of Original Issue 
Principal Payable Date 
Interest Payable Dates 
Payable at 



Elementary School 
Addition Bonds 
3 1/2% 

$139,500.00 
May 1, 1957 
May 1 

May 1 and November 1 
Second National Bank 
of Nashua 



Maturities - Fiscal Year Ending : 



June 30 
June 30 
June 30 
June 30 
June 30 
June 30 
June 30 
June 30 
June 30 
June 30 
June 30 
June 30 
June 30 
June 30 
June 30 
June 30 
June 30 



1972 
1973 
1974 
1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 
1980 
1981 
1982 
1983 
1984 
1985 
1986 
1987 
1988 



Principal 

7,000.00 
7,000.00 
7,000.00 
7,000.00 
7,000.00 
6,000.00 



Interest 

$1,435.00 
1,190.00 
945.00 
700.00 
455.00 
210.00 



$ 41,000.00 



$4,935.00 



91 







Memorial School Addition 






Memorial School Bonds 


Bonds 






3. 


40% 


4. 


307o 






$750, 


,000.00 


$415,000.00 




September 


1, 1964 


June 15, 1968 






November 1 




June 15 








May 1 and 


November 1 


June 15 and 


December 15 






First National Bank 


New England 


Merchants 






of Boston 


Nationa 


1 Bank 


Total- 
























Principal 


Interest 


Principal 


Interest 


Principal 


Interest 


$ 40,000.00 


$ 16,660.00 


$ 20,000.00 


$ 14,620.00 


$ 67,000.00 $ 


32,715.00 


40,000.00 


15,300.00 


20,000.00 


13,760.00 


67,000.00 


30,250.00 


40,000.00 


13,940.00 


20,000.00 


12,900.00 


67,000.00 


27,785.00 


40,000.00 


12,580.00 


20,000.00 


12,040.00 


67,000.00 


25,320.00 


35,000.00 


11,305.00 


20,000.00 


11,180.00 


62,000.00 


22,940.00 


35,000.00 


10,115.00 


20,000.00 


10,320.00 


61,000.00 


20,645.00 


35,000.00 


8,925.00 


20,000.00 


9,460.00 


55,000.00 


18,385.00 


35,000.00 


7,735.00 


20,000.00 


8,600.00 


55,000.00 


16,335.00 


35,000.00 


6,545.00 


20,000.00 


7,740.00 


55,000.00 


14,285.00 


35,000.00 


5,355.00 


20,000.00 


6,880.00 


55,000.00 


12,235.00 


35,000.00 


4,165.00 


20,000.00 


6,020.00 


55,000.00 


10,185.00 


35,000.00 


2,975.00 


20,000.00 


5,160.00 


55,000.00 


8,135.00 


35,000.00 


1,785.00 


20,000.00 


4,300.00 


55,000.00 


6,085.00 


35,000.00 


595.00 


20,000.00 


3,440.00 


55,000.00 


4,035.00 






20,000.00 


2,580.00 


20,000.00 


2,580.00 






20,000.00 


1,720.00 


20,000.00 


1,720.00 






20,000.00 


860.00 


20,000.00 


860.00 



$510,000.00 $117,980.00 



$340,000.00 $131,580.00 



$891,000.00 $254,495.00 



92 



REPORT OF REVENUE ADJUSTMENT 

from 

STATE TAX COMMISSION 

Concord, N. H. 03301 
September 28, 1971 

Your report of appropriations voted and property taxes to be raised 
for the 1971-72 school year has been approved on the following basis: 

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS $1,933,136.00 

Revenues and Credits 

Unencumbered Balance 18,451.50 

Sweepstakes 7,878.33 

Foundation Aid 54,196.90 

School Building Aid 11,109.40 

Dual Enrollment 77,895.00 

School Lunch & Special Milk Program 4,000.00 

PL-874 (Impacted Area - Cur. Oper.) 3,000.00 

PL 8910 (ESEA) 3,619.00 

Other Revenue from Local Sources 100.00 

Bond or Note Issues 550,000.00 

TOTAL REVENUES AND CREDITS $ 730,250.13 

DISTRICT ASSESSMENT 1971 1,202,885.87 

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 1,933,136.00 



STATE TAX COMMISSION 

Lawton B. Chandler, Commissioner 



93 



PELHAM 
1971-1972 




Lunch and 
Special Milk ,9% 

Instructional 
Material 2.2% 

Fixed Charges 2.4% 
Other 2.6% 



Operation and 
Maintenance of 
Plant 3.4% 



Transportation 5.2% 



Debt Service 6.3% 



DISTRIBUTION OF THE SCHOOL DOLLAR 



94 



PELHAM SCHOOL DISTRICT 
School Lunch Program 
Statement of Account and Proof of Balance 
Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1971 



Balance - July 1, 1970 



$ 2,697.64 



Receipt During Year ; 

Lunch Sales - Children 
Lunch Sales - Adults 
Federal Reimbursements 
District Appropriation 
Miscellaneous (Milk Sales, Etc.) 



$28,325.37 
1,870.98 
7,547.05 
9,554.00 
1,613.22 



48,910.62 
$51,608.26 



Expenditures During Year ; 

Food, Including Milk 

Labor - Adults 

Equipment 

Social Security Taxes 

Miscellaneous ( Supplies, Repairs, etc) 



$25,785.24 

20,818.00 

1,238.84 

1,047.65 

1,619.31 



50,509.04 



Balance - June 30, 1971 



$1,099.22 



Proof of Balance 



Balance in the Pelham Bank and Trust Company 
Per Statement June 30, 1971 

Less ; Outstanding Checks 
Reconciled Balance - June 30, 1971 



$ 3,628.86 



2,529.64 



$1,099.22 



95 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT TREASURER 

for the 
FISCAL YEAR JULY 1, 1970 TO JUNE 30, 1971 

Cash on Hand July 1, 1970 $ 29,982.54 

Received from Selectmen $959,872.14 

Revenue from State Sources 117,109.21 

Revenue from Federal Sources 21,976.37 

Received from all Other Sources 1,732. 13 

TOTAL RECEIPTS $1,100,689.85 

Total Amount Available for Fiscal Year 1,130,672.39 
Less School Board Orders Paid 1,112,235.93 

Balance on Hand June 30, 1971 $ 18,436.46 



July 9, 1971 Dorothy Hill 

District Treasurer 



AUDITORS' CERTIFICATE 

This is to certify that we have examined the books, vouchers 
bank statements and other financial records of the treasurer of the 
school district of Pelham of which the above is a true summary 
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1971, and find them correct in 
all respects. 



August 23, 1971 Robert E. Sanderson 

Auditor 



96 



1972-73 



Distribution of Superintendent's Salary 



Hudson 


54.1% 


$ 9,197.00 


Litchfield 


6.0% 


1,020.00 


Pe Iham 


23.0% 


3,910.00 


Windham 


16.9% 


2,873.00 


State of New Hampshire 




4,200.00 
$21,000.00 



Distribution of Assistant Superintendent's Salary 



Hudson 


54.1% 


$ 8,012.21 


Litchfield 


6.0% 


888.60 


Pelham 


23.0% 


3,406.30 


Windham 


16.9% 


2,502.89 


State of New Hampshire 




2,190.00 
$17,000.00 



Distribution of Business Administrator's Salary 



Hudson 


54.1% 


$ 


6,172.81 


Litchfield 


6.0% 




684.60 


Pelham 


23 . 0% 




2,624.30 


Windham 


16.9% 




1,928.29 


State of New Hampshire 






2,190.00 






$13,600.00 




A PORTION of a road map drawn in 1833 depicting Mammoth 
Road, and also noting distances between landmarks. 



97 



PELHAM ENROLLMENT PROJECTION 



Enrolled Enrolled Estimated 

Grade 9/27/71 1/31/72 Sept. 72 

1 182 185 197 

2 146 145 182 

I \\l ^21 152 

^ 126 128 125 

I 128 130 132 

^ 131 129 134 

7 109 112 137 

8 101 104 115 



1042 1054 



1174 



Alvirne 








9 


143 


147 


142 


10 
11 
12 


114 

101 

77 


117 
92 
71 


143 
115 
101 



427 501 



98 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
PELHAM SCHOOL BOARD 



Growth continues to be the element which makes the greatest impact 
upon Pelham's educational program. Enrollments, elementary and secondary, 
continue to rise producing once again the need for additional personnel and 
classrooms, 

A critical elementary space situation arose in 1971. As a result, the 
recessed portion of the 1971 Annual School District Meeting approved a 
$550,000 bond issue to construct an addition to the Sherburne School, At 
this writing, bid documents and specifications are completed and it is 
anticipated that bids will be received in late February and the contract 
awarded prior to the 1972 Annual School District Meeting scheduled for 
March 15, 1972. This addition has been designed as an "open concept" 
school and is Pelham's first encounter with this type of educational archi- 
tecture, A training program to acquaint our teaching staff with "open con- 
cept" methods and to integrate an "open concept" addition into our existing 
lower elementary program is being conducted during the 1971-72 school year. 
It is hoped that the addition will be in use prior to December 31, 1972. 

During 1971 the decision was reached to recommend that Pelham build 
and operate its own high school. This decision crystallized as various 
possible alternatives were eliminated. Over the past two years the Board 
and various committees have explored the possibility of extended involve- 
ment with Alvirne, tuition arrangements with other New Hampshire and 
Massachusetts high schools, an AREA high school, regional high schools 
and cooperative high schools. Even if one of these arrangements would 
produce quality, economical education for Pelham's youngsters, none is 
available. One alternative with promise was a cooperative venture with 
Windham, but, after extended and comprehensive negotiations, this too 
proved impossible to consummate. Thus, at the March 15, 1972 Annual 
Meeting there will be warrant articles relating to a Pelham High School. 
One will be for a bond issue of $2,500,000 (stretching the borrowing 
capacity of Pelham nearly to its limit). Probably there will also be 
articles requesting preliminary planning funds and funds to purchase a 
site for the high school. The plan put into operation by the Board con- 
templates a Pelham High School opening its doors in September, 1974, 

In the warrant for the March 15, 1972 meeting will be an article to 
determine whether the District would like to have a five member school 
board. In the Board's opinion such a change is desireable and necessary. 
With a high school "in the works", with the total elementary and second- 
ary enrollment creeping toward 2,000 pupils, with a professional staff soon 
to exceed 100, and with a transportation budget in the vicinity of $100,000, 
the Board faces numerous complex and financially- significant decisions. Then 



99 



too there are such issues as the "open concept", the year-round school, 
teacher negotiations, special pupil education and curriculum revision to be 
faced and resolved. A five member board provides two additional talents to 
cope with these educational issues and to share a workload that continues 
to expand as the system increases in size and complexity, 

July 1, 1971 saw the birth of a new Supervisory Union #27 consisting 
of the Towns of Hudson, Litchfield, Pelham, and Windham. After an exhaustive 
springtime search, Peter G. Dolloff of Bedford, New Hampshire was selected 
Superintendent of Schools and Frank A. Kaffel, of Candia, New Hampshire, 
Assistant Superintendent. The transition of a new Union #27 was smooth 
and without serious crisis. During its initial period of operation, the 
new leadership of the Union displayed vigor, judgment and an innovative 
ability not commonly observed within the educational leadership establishment, 

However, our educational problems are just beginning. Continued 
growth in Pelham during the Seventies will strain further a system already 
seriously strained. While the C.E.F.S. Report indicated that 14-16 addi- 
tional classrooms would satisfy our elementary needs until 1980, the Board 
anticipates that when the Sherburne Addition opens its doors, all but three 
or four classrooms will be occupied; and this without any rooms devoted 
to a public kindergarten. Some thought was given to constructing a 600 
pupil high school to be available in September 1974. Pupil enrollment 
projections, however, indicated that such a high school would be full 
shortly after it was put into use. Thus, it became necessary to plan at 
minimum for an 800 pupil high school with the hope that it would be suffici- 
ent for three or four years. It appears certain that additional elementary 
space will be required as soon as, or shortly after, the high school is con- 
structed. And, if an 800 pupil high school is built, that may have to be 
added onto before the decade of the Seventies runs its course. All of which 
means that if the present rate of growth continues, schools will be con- 
structed almost continuously during the Seventies. Since it appears that 
growth cannot be stopped completely, the course of wisdom should induce us 
to attempt to alter the type of growth we have been experiencing. In 
addition, it is the Board's opinion that the year-round school or some 
variant of it must be explored thoroughly in the near future. 

Contributions of many individuals and various committees, groups and 
organizations served to better education in Pelham during 1971. The School 
Board extends its gratitude to the Sherburne School Planning Committee, 
Holmes Tracy, Eleanor Burton, Richard Sampton, Lawrence Ormsby, Frank 
Bromley, Andrew Dow and John Groele; the AREA Committee, Frederick Bischoff 
and James O'Hearn; the High School Building Committee, Michael McLlarky, 
Philip Labranch, Arthur Hanlon, Frederick Bischoff, Cornelius Ives, Robert 
Sirois, John Lavallee, and Frank Foisie; the High School Site Committee, 
Churchill Rood, William Lappen, Charles Hamblett, Richard Holmes and 
Richard Craven; the High School Curriculum Committee, Constance Case, 



100 



Alice McEdwards, Harold Mooney, Mark Nickerson and Linda Everhard; the 
Transportation Committee, John Woodbury, Bernice Goldsmith, Anne Doherty, 
Edmond Lapointe and Russell Leonard; the Library Volunteers the Parent 
Teachers Association; the Sherburne School Teacher Aids and the Pelham 
Lions Club, The efforts of these and many more will be needed to insure 
continued educational excellence for Pelham' s youngsters. 

Respectfully submitted. 

The Pelham School Board' 
By its Chairman, 



Philip R. Currier 



101 



DOES PELHAM NEED A HIGH SCHOOL? 



In order to help you answer this question the various committees 
(Building, Curriculum, Site) have put together the following information for 
your consideration. 

Our present contract with the Town of Hudson, N.H, expires in June 
1974 and no new enrollments will be accepted by that municipality. It has 
also been noted that the Town of Hudson will consider an article in its 
warrant in March to switch to year-round schooling. This may mean that 
Pelham children already in that school system will be sent to classes during 
the summer months with their vacations coming in fall, winter or spring. 
It could mean double sessions depending on what action the Hudson school 
district may take at that time. 

The Pelham School Board has been advised by the Hudson School Board 
that no new contract is forthcoming for 1974. For that matter, contract 
negotiations with any school district within a reasonable distance of 
Pelham may be impossible. 

In short, it appears that Pelham will require secondary schooling for 
roughly 600 students in 1974 and may have a poor chance of negotiating a 
simple contract with any one school at that time. It is conceivable, in 
that tjrpe of emergency, that several contracts with several schools could 
be negotiated for smaller groups of children. We wonder if this would be 
a wise consideration in the light of increased transportation costs and 
probable upward variations in tuition costs. 

A committee, commissioned in late 1971, conaidfixed the possibility 
of constructing a cooperative high school for the use of Pelham and Windham 
children. It was the feeling of some of this committee that the Town of 
Windham was reluctant to enter into any working agreement which could 
materialize in time to solve Pelham' s imminent problem due to tha fact 
that Windham has a long term contract with Pinkerton Academy (circa 1978). 

In order to pre-empt this situation the Pelham School Board has 
appointed various committees to study the problem. 

The Building Committee has interviewed 16 architects concerning their 
credentials, their recent undertakings, and their capabilities in solving 
Pelham' s impending problem. This field of 16 has been narrowed to three 
and further intensive investigations will be conducted to arrive at a final 
choice. 

This committee has, to date, made five field trips and viewed 12 to 
15 schools either completed or in various stages of construction. 



102 



The building committee is devoted to the task (if commissioned by the 
school district) of erecting for Pelham a high school of good quality, 
functionally suitable for the educational requirements of both the curri- 
culum committee and the State Board of Education at the absolute minimum 
cost to the taxpayer. 

For the past year, your high scholl curriculum committee has been 
exhaustively researching the prospective educational needs of Pelham. 

The School Board has approved, among others, the following important 
suggestions as formulated by this committee: 

A. Your 800-pupil, semi-open concept high school will provide a 
comprehensive program. This means that students who will end their formal 
educations upon graduation from high school will be allowed to choose 
either a general or an industrial arts program. Pupils planning to attend 
two or four-year colleges will be able to elect college preparatory 
courses. 

B, Design of the high school building will allow flexibility in 
choice of subjects offered. The semi-open concept permits students to 
choose: 1) mini-courses, 2) independent study and 3) be formally instructed 
in traditional manner in classroom group sizes ranging from 10 to 60 pupils 
per class. Class size will depend upon a particular study unit desirable 
number of students for optimum learning potential. 

Your curriculum committee has studiously sought to recommend the 
best possible academic environment for your children. 

This we believe we have accomplished while remaining within the Town's 
financial limitations. 

Moreover, you may foresee the same problems that the School Board and 
the various committees do. Therefore, please come to the open public 
hearing (where the proposed Pelham High School will be discussed) to be 
conducted on the evening of February 16 at 7:30 p,m at the Memorial School 
Gymnasium, 

For the Pelham School Board 

Pelham High School Building Committee 
Pelham High School Curriculum Committee 
Pelham High School Site Committee 

P.S, In order to keep the school district informed the various committees 
will attempt to prepare and deliver a progress report once each month to 
completion. 



103 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF PAYMENTS 
1970-71 



Salaries of District Officers: 
Currier, Philip 
O'Hearn, Grace 
Brock, Donald 
Hill, Dorothy 
Balcom, Edward 

Contracted Services for Administration: 
State of N.H. 
Marjorie Nicker son 
Highlander Printers 
Soule 6e Leslie 
Highland Chair Service 



Other Expenses for Administration: 
Postmaster PeUiam N.H. 
Hudson School District 
G.C. Prince & Son 
Nat;l School Boards Assoc, 
N.H. School Boards Assoc. 
Marion Office Equip. 
Hogan's Florist 
Maxfield Press 
CCM Professional Mag. 
Center for Ed. Field Services 
Wood Bros, Florists 
State of N.H. 
Martell Co. 
Dunbar Register 



400.00 




300.00 




300.00 




325.00 


1,325.00 




15.00 


240.43 




300.00 




75.00 




537.90 




40.00 






1,193.33 


93.60 




31.08 




19.00 




18.00 




149.00 




8.00 




3.00 




52.00 




15.00 




15.00 




7.73 




1.00 




125.64 




37.35 





575.40 



104 



Salaries for Instruction: 
Avery, Dorothy 
Bedard , Linda 
Bellisle, Lillian 
Bedrard, Therese 
Borry, Betty Jane 
Bowler, Ruth 
Chalifoux, Ethel 
Cormier, Joanne 
Cotta, Jacqueline 
Desilets, Brian 
Dickinson, Katharine 
Doumas , Anthony 
Duclos, John 
Duclas, Shirley Ann 
Fairbanks, Gail 
Frederick, Rita M. 
Gallagher, Robert 
Gunning, Margaret 
Ha Howe 11, Benjamin 
Houde , Anna 
Jordan, Julia 
Katsoupis, John 
Keezer, Lucille 
Lesser, Betsy 
Low, Richard 
McNulty, Dorothy 
Maheu, Roland 
Mahoney, Karen 
Marsh, Elsa Ann 
Martin, Harold 
Martin, Raymond 
Meltzer, David 
Miller, Robert 
Mooney, Joann 
Mooney, Mary 
Nimphius, Egan Dianne 
Nutter, Judith 
Palmer, Jean 
Quinn, Mary Elizabeth 
Richardson, Ruth 
Riley, Judith 
Rivard, Carol 
Rivet, Maryann 
Roark, Marcia 
Rosa, Christina 
Sanders, Margaret 



9700.00 
7000.00 
3350.00 
7700.00 
4221.15 
1686.24 
9200.00 
7000.00 
7400.00 
7000.00 
1267.35 
6700.00 
8300.00 
7500.00 
7900.00 
9200.00 
9500.00 
8500.00 
5931.86 
7500.00 
9200.00 

10100.00 
9300.00 
6229,27 
7500.00 
9600.00 
9800.00 
6700.00 
6700.00 

11578.96 
7300.00 
3600.00 
7500.00 
6700.00 
9600.00 
7000.00 
6700.00 
7000.00 
7900.00 
9600.00 
7500.00 
7600.00 
7000.00 
7000.00 
6700.00 
3350,00 



105 



Saunderson, Millicent 
Shanahan , Sandra 
Shelley, Elizabeth 
Somers, Eileen 
Weinberg, Fredic 
White, Judith 
Wood, Gregory 
Lewandowski, Charlene 
Dike, Linda 
Davison, Sandra 
Kontinos, Nicholas 
Substitutes 
Rinehart Systems 



6700.00 
7300.00 
8300.00 
7000.00 
6700.00 
7000.00 
7000.00 
2788.17 
4852.14 
5674.50 
7615.50 
10796.51 
1000.00 



418,041.65 



Salary of Secretary: 
Corbin, Sandra 



3800.00 



3,800.00 



Textbooks : 

Addison-Wesley Publ. 
American Book Co. 
Benefic Press 
Ginn & Co. 

Har court Brace & World 
Harper & Row Publishers 
J. B. Lippincott Co. 
Lyons & Carnahan Inc. 
McGraw-Hill Book Co. 
The MacMillan Co. 
Charles Merrill Publ. Co. 
Random House School & Lib. Srr, 
Reader's Digest Services 
Science Research Assoc. 
Scott Foresman & Co. 
Follett Educational Corp. 
Litton Educational Publ. 
Holt Rinehart 6e Winston Inc. 
Litton Educational Corp. 
Allyn 6c Bacon Inc. 



1802.30 

1782.19 

56.28 

51.60 

222.48 

797.08 

136.62 

209.90 

244.91 

33.18 

289.65 

89.24 

54.06 

890.52 

1626.73 

192.22 

8.10 

297.66 

1237.41 

12.92 



10,035.05 



Library Books : 

Responsive Environment Corp, 
Magazine Supply House 
Americana Annual Corp. 
Bro-Dart Inc. 



793.34 
118.70 

6.70 
205.35 



1,125.09 



106 



Aud iovi sua 1 Ren ta 1 s : 

Association Films 
Educational Devel, Center 
Ideal Pictures 
University of N.H. 



Films trips: 

Budek File & Slides of Calif 

Encyclopedia Britannica Corp 

Eye Gate House Inc. 

H B Educational Systems 

Singer Ed and Training Products 



225.10 

10.00 

207.15 

3.00 



2.80 

6.15 

226.75 

437.95 

253.31 



445.25 



926.96 



Maps, Charts & Globes: 
Edmund Scientific 
Beckley Cardy Co. 
George F. Cram 
A. J. Nystrom Co. 
Cambosco Scientific 
McGraw-Hill Book Co. 



Other Audiovisual: 

J.L. Hammett Co. 

Lorraine Music Co. 

Educational Activities 

Ginn & Co. 

Laid law Brothers 

Litton Educational Publ. Inc. 

Educational Reading Service 

Harvard Trust Co. 

Hubbard Scientific Co. 

Lyons Band Instrument Co. 

McGraw-Hill Book Co. 

Cambosco Inc. 

Harvard Cooperative Society 



7.50 

31.76 

361.05 

160.75 

17.99 

7.68 



17.98 
5.60 
69.89 
13.20 
36.48 
19.98 

116.93 
21.60 

128.33 

32.23 

24.03 

20.05 

2.55 



586.73 



508.85 



107 



Teaching Supplies: 

Milton Bradley Co. 
J.L. Haniraett Co, 
Mainco School Supply Co. 
Science Research Assoc. 
Scott Foresman & Co. 
Henry S. Wolkins Co. 
Standard Duplicator Sales 
Northern Supply Co. 
Addison-Wesley Publ. Co. 
Northern Supply Co. 



1710.57 

108.64 

2888.02 

251.94 

40.71 

753.20 

72.68 

39.63 

21.77 

63.40 



5,950.56 



Guidance 6e Testing: 

Hare our t Brace & World 
Teachers College Press 
Harcourt Brace Jovanovich Inc 



977.34 

20.98 

211.32 



1,209.64 



Music; 



Hampshire Music Co. 
Gable Hinged Music 
Readers Digest 
Lyons Band 



110.77 
10.95 
19.84 
19.40 



160.96 



Art: 



Milton Bradley Co. 

J.L. Hammett Co, 

Giant of Derry 

Pejjiain Hardware 6e buppiy Co, 

Hamtnar Hardware 

Northern Supply Co. 



124.80 
155,36 

14.76 
8.71 

27.49 
665.81 



996.93 



Physical Education: 

American Knitwear & Emblem 
PeUiam Hardware & Supply Co. 
Program Aids 

Wolverine Sports Supply Co, 
Lull & Hartford Inc. 



Science: 

Milton Bradley Co. 
Cambosco Inc. 



.53 

23.40 

21.91 

445.57 

3.00 



6.60 
487.53 



494,41 



494,13 



108 



Reading: 




Harper & Row Publishers 


12.37 


Lyons & Carnahan Inc. 


440.33 


McGraw-Hill Book Co. 


59.82 


Charles E. Merrill Publ. Co. 


31.08 


Science Research Assoc. 


207.99 


Scott Foresman & Co. 


411.41 


Benson' s 


15.95 


Northern Supply Co, 


55.65 


Standard Duplicator Sales 


66.63 


Stop & Shop Inc. 


15.18 


Barnell Loft Ltd. 


39.50 


Ginn & Co. 


136.47 


Roller Educational Corp. 


445.50 


MacMillan Co. 


57.63 


Scholastic Book Services 


28.80 


University of Nebraska Press 


54.08 



Weekly Readers: 

American Education Publ. 
Scholastic Magazines 



Math Workbooks: 

Addison-Wesley Publ. Co. 

Office Supplies: 

The Phaneuf Press 
Dennis Office Supply Corp. 
National School Methods 
Owl Stamp 6c Supply Co. 
National School Service 
Taft Business Machines Iitc, 
Maxfield Press 
Hammar Hardware Co. 
Jones Typewriter Co. 



Graduation: 

Maxfield Press 



260.40 
433.60 



762.00 



8, 


.00 


3, 


.10 


17, 


.75 


5. 


.00 


4. 


.00 


98, 


.65 


49, 


.85 


10. 


.36 


6, 


.12 



2,078.39 



694.00 
762.00 



24.00 



202.83 
24.00 



109 



Professional Meetings: 
Brian Desilets 
Margaret Gunning 
Elsa Marsh 
Shirley Pavelka 
Elizabeth Shelley 
John Duclos 

N.H. School Boards Assoc. 
Roland Maheu 
Drug Abuse Symposium 
Pelham Memorial School 



Teacher Workshop : 

Hudson School District 



10. 


.00 


14. 


.80 


14. 


.00 


11. 


.75 


14. 


.24 


14. 


.08 


14. 


.00 


22. 


.60 


32. 


.00 


52. 


.00 



40.50 



199.47 
40.50 



Professional Publications: 
Alljm & Bacon Inc. 
Davis Publications 
Organication of Amer, Historian 
Penn State Univ. Press 
Educational Activities 
Harper & Row Publishers 
Holt Rinehart & Winston 
Porter Sargent Publi 
Hudson School District 
Beckley-Cardy Co. 
McKinley Publ. Co. 
Educators Progress Service 
International Reading Assoc. 
American School Health Ass'n 



4.10 

5.78 

8.00 

7.50 

6.69 

6.16 

11.84 

14.45 

3.13 

3.22 

5.00 

9.75 

15.25 

30.00 



130.87 



Report Cards & Records : 
Maxfield Press 
A.H. Rice Co. 



162.00 
20.23 



182.23 



Postage & General Expense: 

Pelham Memorial School 



100.00 



100.00 



Salary of Nurse: 

Groele, June 
Hamel, Joyce 



5600.00 
2800.00 



8,400.00 



110 



other Expenses for Health Services: 
Vinod Tripathi, Md. 
Plunketts Drug Stores 
Coil's Medical Supplies 
School Health Supply Co. 
Joyce Hamel 
June Groele 
Maxfield Press 
Edson C. Eastman Co. 
New England School Supply 
Roland Maheu 



Contracted Services for Transportation; 
Leonard, Russell 

Salaries of Custodians; 

Chamber 1 in, Charles 
Couilliard, Raymond 
Dumais, Lionel 
Jelley, William 
Kimba 1 1 , Thur s t on 
Masson, George 
Desmarias, Joseph 
Chamber 1 in, Spencer 
De lisle, Kenneth 
Mendes, Daniel 
Gil lis, Donald 
Quinn, Timothy 



Supplies for Operation of Plant: 
Dracut Hardware 
Ray's Superette Inc. 
Pelham Hardware & Supply 
Acme Chemical Co. 
Allston Supply Co. 
C 6c I Electrical Supply Co. 
Central Paper Products 
C.B. Dolge Co. 

Interstate Restaurant Equip. 
George T. Johnson Co. 
John R. Lyman Co. 
Manchester Paper Supply Co. 
Pelham Center Garage 
Portsmouth Paper Co. 
Ray's Auto Parts Inc. 
Richco Products Inc. 
Rochester Germicide Co. 



562.50 

152.53 

4.05 

30.85 

50.00 

100.00 

12.60 

16.35 

19.66 

14.40 





962.94 


15,800.00 


15,800.00 


2760.00 




1414.40 




5408.00 




5408.00 




2329.60 




4368.00 




93.60 




1970.80 




145.60 




3848.00 




260.00 




1471.12 





61.83 

1.92 

165.70 

885.70 

252.76 

96.40 

535.72 

92.00 

151.95 

272.92 

112.00 

84.00 

31.81 

83.44 

15.62 

22.00 

62.75 



29,477.12 



111 



Shur-Az Chemical Mfg. Co. 19.20 
Westinghouse Electric Supply • 223.20 

John R. Lyman Co, 36.00 

Heald Building Supplies 36.00 

Brooklea Service Station 5.80 

McKit trick Hardware Co. 42.16 

AG Hardware Supply 26.39 

J.I. Holcomb Mfg. Co. 390.66 

Young's 32.95 

Gate City Electrical Supply 14.40 

Bedford School District 43.20 

A.L. Okum Co. 24.80 

Ideal Key Shop 14.95 

Master Lock Co. 1.06 



Contracted Services for Operation of Plant; 
Daniel Mendes 
Richard Roketenetz 



Heat: 

Haffner's Service Stations 
C.H. Sprague & Son 



Electricity: 

Granite State Electric Co, 



Gas 



Bot-L-Gas Inc. 
Dalrjmiple Gas Co, 



Telephone: 

New England Telephone Co. 

Other Expenses for Operation of Plant 
The Lowell Sun 

Replace Instructional Equipment: 
Mainco School Supply Co. 
Don's Radio Sales & Service 
A.H. Rice Co. 





3,839.29 


48.00 




199.50 






247.50 


3337.12 




5928.89 






9,266.01 


7836.08 


7,836.08 


415.41 




19.00 






434.41 


1462.10 


1,462.10 


16.74 


16.74 


1519.52 




65.00 




122.72 





1,707.24 



112 



Replace Non-Instructional Equipment: 

C & L Power Equipment 700.00 

J. L. Hammett Co. 41.08 

American Air Filter Co. 94.47 

Bride, Grimes Supply Co. 215.00 

Roussel's Marine Inc. 22.40 

Vernon M. Heipler 257.08 

Sears Roebuck & Co. 37.90 



Repair Instructional Equipment: 
Standard Duplicator Sales 
A.B. Dick Co. 

Maic Hearing Service of N.H. 
Taft Business Machines Inc. 
A. H. Rice Co. 
Pelham Hardware 6e Supply- 
Granite State Piano Service 
Pelham TV & Appliance Co. 



Repair Non- Instructional Equipment; 
Dracut Hardware 
Fairgrieve Co, 
McKi trick Hardware 
Chagnon Lumber Co. 
Chelmsford Cement Products 
Keyes Fire Equipment Co. 
Temp Control Engineering Inc. 
Jones Typewriter Co. 
AG Hardware Co. 
Pelham Hardware & Supply 
Pelham Center Garage 
C & I Electrical Supply Co. 
Ray's Auto Parts Inc. 
Lowell Plumbing Supply 
Charles Chamber lin 



Contracted Services for Maintenance of Plant 
Simplex Time Recorder Co. 
Action-King Sewer Service 
AG Hardware Supply 
Dracut Hardware 
Canfield 

Farm Bureau Association 
George Neskey 



87. 


.00 


195, 


.64 


68, 


.00 


13, 


.00 


318. 


.40 


3. 


.85 


15. 


.00 


31. 


.35 


2. 


.76 


7. 


.20 


25. 


.24 


41. 


.00 


23. 


.00 


74. 


.00 


184. 


.52 


13. 


.00 


8. 


.80 


8. 


.61 


2. 


.00 


3, 


.76 


5. 


.30 


23. 


.14 


16. 


,06 


56. 


,25 


129, 


,00 


36. 


,08 


28. 


,76 


91. 


,75 


25. 


,90 


94. 


00 



1,367.93 



732.24 



438.33 



461.74 



113 



Repair of Buildings: 

AG Hardware Supply 

City Mirror & Glass Co, 

McKitrick Hardware 

Daniel Mendes 

PeUiam Hardware 6e Supply 

Lowell Plate Sc Mirror Co, 

Elliott's 

Hardware Consultants Inc. 

Environmental Control Assoc, 

J.D, Plumbing & Heating Co, 

Lowell Plumbing Supply Co, 

Scott Hardware 

Bride, Grimes 6e Co, 

Burner 6e Heating Supply Co, 

Walter P. Byrne 

George Masson 

Spencer Chamber lin 

Charles Chamber lin 

Anthony Dumais 

Andrew J. Dow 

Dracut Hardware 



Repair Boilers: 

Scannel Boiler Works 
N,H, Dept, of Labor 
Haffner*s Service Stations 
Burner & Heating Supply Inc, 
AG Hardware & Supply 



Other Expenses for Maintenance of Plant 
Ray*s Catch Basin Service 



704. 


.72 


434, 


.25 


15, 


.89 


423. 


,80 


46. 


.24 


607, 


.45 


96. 


.81 


17. 


.81 


64, 


.23 


324. 


.76 


23, 


.58 


1.44 


120. 


.70 


74. 


.63 


44. 


.00 


205. 


.90 


78. 


.00 


125. 


.80 


93. 


,60 


37. 


.50 


3. 


.17 


21. 


.00 


8. 


,00 


13. 


,04 


43. 


.57 


34. 


.56 



3,544,28 



76,50 



120,17 
76,50 



Fixed Charges: 

N.H, Retirement System 
F.I.CA. 



8989,97 
14230,89 



23,220.86 



Insurance : 

Harmon Insurance Agency 
N.H.-Vt. Hosp 6e Phys Service 
Hudson School District 



6427.20 

5818.48 

37,70 



12,283,38 



114 



School Lunch: 

Federal Monies 
District Monies 



7547.05 
9554.00 







17,101.05 


Other Expenses for School Lunch: 






William Jelley 


200.00 


200.00 


Student-Body Activities: 






Salaries 


250.00 




Pelham Cleaners 


15.00 




N.H. Music Educators Assoc. 


10.00 




Champion Products Inc. 


327.71 


- 


Lull & Hartford Inc. 


30.75 




Leonard Bus Inc. 


350.00 




School Assembly Service 


130.00 




American Knitwear 6c Emblem 


46.43 




Riverside Sports 


56.40 




National Education Assoc. 


114.35 




Rogers Printing, Card & Toy Co. 


56.44 




Leonard Bus Inc. 


327.70 




John Newcomb 


24.00 




Raymond Martin 


30.00 




Roland Maheu 


50.00 




Ronald Walsh 


15.00 




Shirley Pavelka 


50.00 




< 




1,883.78 


Buildings: 






Center for Ed. Field Services 


5087.50 


5,087.50 


New Equipment: 




- 


Milton Bradley Co. 


14.00 




Northern Supply Co. 


121.76 




AG Hardware Supply 


22.98 




Maine o School Supply 


14.68 




Steve's Used Cars & Parts 


26.00 




Charles S. Chamber lin 


15.00 




HB Educational Systems 


292.22 




A.H. Rice Co. 


1003.00 




Ray's Auto Parts Inc. 


12.82 




State of New Hampshire 


32.66 





1,555.12 



115 



Principal of Debt: 

First Natl, Bank - Boston 

Bank of New Hampshire 

New England Merchants Natl, 



Interest on Debt: 

First Natl. Bank of Boston 

Bank of New Hampshire 

New England Merchants Natl, 



Tuition In-State: 

Salem School District 
Hudson School District 



40,000.00 

7,000.00 

25,000.00 



18,020.00 

1,680.00 

15,695.00 



780.43 
317,826.00 



Tuition Out-Of-State: 

Norfolk County Agri. School 
City of Haverhill, Mass. 



Tuition to Other Than Public Schools 
Ernest L. Herrman School 
Salem School District 
Mount Hope School 



700.00 
2,631.00 



820.00 

536.00 

1,760.00 



72,000.00 



35,395.00 



318,606.43 



District's Share of Supervisory Union Expenses: 

Union #27 12,851.39 12,851.39 



3,331.00 



3,116.00 



Transportation to Other Than Public Schools: 

Wayne A, Bariteau 43.20 

Pelham Transport Service 4,668.00 

Muriel Pelton 528.96 



5,240.16 



116 



Tutoring : 

John A. Katsoupis 
Shirley Pavelka 
Marcia Roard 
Linda Bedard 
Jo Ann Mooney 
Mary Mooney 
Sandra Shanahan 
Raymond Martin 
Jacqualine Cotta 



262.88 

182.00 

123.38 

15.75 

21.58 

91.20 

208.29 

12.11 

29.00 



946.19 



TOTAL EXPENDITURES 



$1,051,307.71 



;^ 



117 



SCHOOL WARRANT 
The State of New Hampshire 

To the inhabitants of the School District in the Town of Pelham, New 
Hampshire, qualified to vote in district affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Memorial School in said district 
on the 7th day of March 1972, at 10 a.m. in the forenoon to act upon the 
f o 1 lowing que s t ions : 

1. To choose a Moderator for the coming year. 

2* To choose a Clerk for the ensuing year. 

3. To choose a Member of the School Board 

for the ensuing three years. 

4. To choose a Treasurer for the ensuing year. 

The polls will be open at 10 a.m. and will close no sooner than 8 p.m. 

Given under our hands at said Pelham, New Hampshire this 8th day of 
February 1972. 



School Board 
A True Copy of Warrant - Attest: 



School Board 



SCHOOL WARRANT 
The State of New Hampshire 

To the inhabitants of the School District in the Town of Pelham, 
New Hampshire, qualified to vote in district affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Memorial School in said district 
on the 15th day of March, 1972, at 7:30 p.m. to act upon the following 
subjects: 

1. To see if the District will vote to authorize the design, 
construction and equipping of a new High School and the acquisition of 
a site by whatever means necessary for said school and appropriate a sum 
not to exceed $2,800,000 for the aforesaid purposes. Said sum to be in 
addition to any bond investment interest and other local. State or Federal 
funds made available therefor and to raise the same by issuance of bonds 
or serial notes in accordance with the provisions of the Municipal Finance 
Act, Chapter 33 of the Revised Statutes Annotated of New Hampshire as 
amended, and to authorize the Pelham School Board to so issue and negotiate 
said bonds, or notes in the name of or on the credit of the District, said 
Board to have discretionary powers described in Section 8 of said Chapter 
33 in respect to said notes or bonds. 

2. To determine and appoint the salaries of the School Board 
and Truant Officer and fix the compensation of any other officers or 
agents of the District. 

3. To see what sum of money the District will vote to raise and 
appropriate for the pajnment of interest and principal in the event Article 
1 is passed. 

4. To hear the reports of Agents, Auditors, Committees or 
Officers chosen, and pass any vote relating thereto. 

5. To choose Agents, Auditors, and Committees in relation to any 
subject embraced in this warrant. 

6. To see if the District will vote to establish a five member 
school board pursuant to Revised Statues Annotated Chapter 197, Section 15: 
Said board to be created by electing three members at the annual school 
district election in 1973, two members for three year terms, and one member 
for one year term; and said board to be maintained by electing two members 
for three year terms in 1974, one member for a three year term in 1975, two 
members for three year term in 1976, and so on in succeeding years. 

7. To see if the District will vote to authorize the School Board 



to establish an Industrial Arts and a Home Economics program: and to raise 
and appropriate the siom of Eighty Thousand ($80,000) Dollars for that purpose, 

8. To see if the School District will elect to approve of the 
inclusion of its officers and custodial employees in the New Hampshire 
Retirement System of the State of New Hampshire, which system is provided 
for by RSA 100-A and any subsequent amendment thereto, to be effective as 
of July 1, 1972 and to see what sum of money the district will vote to 
raise and appropriate for this purpose. 

9. To see what sum of money the District will vote to raise and 
appropriate for the support of schools, for the payment of salaries for the 
School District and agents and for the payment of the statutory obligations 
of the District, that is, to see if the School District will vote to accept 
the School District Budget as prepared by the Budget Committee or to take 
any other action theroen. 

10. By Petition of -- Robert M. Quintitiani, Patricia A. 
Quintitiani, Carol Slavin and others; To see if the District will vote to 
authorize and direct the School Board to publish hot lunch menus a week in 
advance in local newspapers, for action at the 1972 School District Meeting 
and make any necessary appropriations thereof. 

Given under our hands at said Pelham this 

DAY OF , 19 . 

Philpi R. Currier 



Donald Brock 



Grace O'Hearn 



School Board 

A True Copy of Warrant - Attest: 

Philip R. Currier 



Donald Brock 



Grace O'Hearn 



School Board 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 
TAX COMMISSION 




1972-73 

BUDGET FORM FOR SCHOOL DISTRICTS WHICH HAVE ADOPTED 
THE PROVISIONS OF THE MUNICIPAL BUDGET LAW 



PEIHAM 



.SCHOOL DISTRICT 



DISTRIBUTION OF FORMS 

BUDGET (RSA 32:7): Forward one signed copy of the budget as approved by 
the Budget Committee to the State Tax Commission. 



RSA 32:5 PREPARATION OF BUDGET. The budget committee shall prepare budgets according to forms pre- 
scribed by the tax commission for town expenditures,school district expenditures and village district expend- 
itures, it shall hold at least one public hearing on each budget, public notice, and time of which shall be 
given at least seven days in advance. The budget committee shall confer with selectmen, school boards, 
village district commissioners and other officers and departments relative to estimated costs, revenues antici- 
pated, and services performed; and it shall be the dut/ of all such officers and other persons to furnish such 
pertinent information to the budget committee. Selectmen, school boards, village district commissioners and 
department heads shall prepare a statement of estimated expenses and receipts for the ensuing year and 
submit the same to the budget committee at such time as the budget committee shall fix. The budget com- 
mittee shall prepare and submit to the selectmen for them to post with the town warrant two copies of the 
budget prepared for the town at least fifteen days before the annual town meeting. It shall likewise prepare 
and submit to the school board, or village district commissioners two copies of a school district or village dis- 
trict budget to be acted upon at the school district or village district annual meetings at least fifteen days be- 
fore said annual meeting for posting by the school board or the village district commissioners with the war- 
rants for their respective meetings. 

SEE INSTRUCTIONS FOR COMPLETING FORM ON PAGE 4 



SECTION 1 






1 




BUDGET COMMITTEE 


PURPOSE OF APPROPRIATION 


APPROVED 
BUDGET 
1971-72 


SCHOOL BOARD'S 
BUDGET 
197^-73 


RECOMMENDED 
I 972-73 


SUeMITTED 

WITHOUT 

RECOMMENDATION 


IXK). Administration 


X X X X 


X 


XXXX 


X 


XXXX 


X 


XXXX 


X 


110. Salaries 


1,350 


Loo 


2,070 


.00 


2,070. 


00 






135. Contracted Services 


1,008 


.00 


11343 


.00 


1,343, 


00 






190. Other Exper>ses 


800 


,00 


1,375 


.00 


875, 


00 






200. Instruction 


X X X X 


X 


XXXX 


X 


XXXX 


X 


XXXX 


X 


210. Salaries 


455,800 


.00 


538,567 


.00 


524,093. 


00 


10,700. 


00 


215. Textbooks 


11,493 


.00 


12,966 


.00 


12,966. 


00 






220. Library & Audiovisual Materials 


12,449 


.00 


7,918 


.00 


7,458. 


00 






230. Teaching Supplies 


16,484 


.00 


21,514 


.00 


21,109. 


00 






235. Contracted Services 


- 




— 




- 








290. Other Expenses 


1,000 


.00 


7,122 


.00 


6,447. 


00 






300. Attendonco Services 


50 


.00 


50 


.00 


50. 


00 






400. HeaSth Sorvices 


12,700 


.00 


13,280 


.00 


13,280. 


00 






500. Pupil Transportation 


96,719 


,00 


102,600 


.00 


97,600. 


00 






600. Operation of Plont 


XX5^X 


X 


xx±x 


X 


XXXX 


X 


XXXX 


X 


610. Salaries 


32.540 


.00 


41,495 


.00 


41,183. 


00 






630. Supplies 


5,000 


.00 


6,700 


.00 


5,000. 


00 






635. Contracted Services 


135 


,00 


1.300 


.00 


1,300, 


00 






640. Heat 


7.400 


,00 


12,000 


.00 


12,000. 


00 






645. Utilities 


10.180 


.00 


13.250 


.00 


12,630. 


00 






690. Other Expenses 


_ 




56 


.00 


- 








700. Maintenance of Plant 


8,577 


.00 


5,680 


.00 


5,680. 


00 






800. Fixed Charges 


X X X X 


X 


XXXX 


X 


XXXX 


X 


XXXX 


X 


850. Employee Retirement & F.I.C.A. 


32,190 


.00 


47,020 


.00 


43,389. 


00 


2,780. 


00 


855. Insurance 


12,125 


.00 


13,500 


.00 


13,500. 


00 






860. Rent 


- 




- 




- 








890. Other Expenses 


- 




- 




- 








900* School Lunch & Spec. Milk Program 


16.099 


.00 


20,754 


.00 


20,754. 


00 






1000. Student-Body Activitios 


3,307 


.00 


3,826 


.00 


3,826. 


00 






1 100. Community Activities 


77.895 


.00 


596 


.00 


308. 


00 






1200. Capital Outloy 


xxxx 


X 


XXXX 


X 


XXXX 


X 


XXXX 


X 


1265. Sites 


_ _ 




15,000 


.00 


15,000. 


00 






1266. Buildings 


550,000 


.00 


2,800,000 


.00 


2,500,000. 


00 






1 267. Equipment 


100 


.00 


4,791 


.00 


4,791, 


00 






1300. Debt Service 


XXXX 


X 


XXXX 


X 


XXXX 


X 


XXXX 


X 


1370. Principal of Debt 


67,000 


.00 


107,000 


.00 


107,000. 


00 






1371. Interest on Debt 


49,215 


.00 


139,840 


.00 


130,840. 


00 






1 390. Other Debt Service 


- 




- 




- 








1477. ' Outgoing Transfer Accounts in Stote 


XXXX 


X 


XXXX 


X 


XXXX 


X 


XXXX 


"X" 


1477.1. Tuition 


395.167 


,00 


519.687 


,00 


519,687. 


00 






1477.2. Transportation 






_ 




- 








1477.3. Supervisory Union Expenses 


20,902 


.00 


22.913 


,00 


- 




22,913. 


00 


1477.5. Payments into Cap. Res. Funds 






- 




- 








1477.9. Other Expenses 


- 




- 




- 








1478. Outgoing Transfer Acc'ts. out of State 


XXXX 


X 


XXXX 


X 


XXXX 


X 


XXXX 


X 


1478.1. Tuition 


4,635 


.00 


4,068 


.00 


4,068. 


00 






1478.2. Transportation 


- 




- 




- 








1478.9. Other Expenses 


_ 




- 




- 








1479. Expenditures to other than Pub. Schools 


2,454 


.00 


6,320 


.00 


8,920. 


00 






1600. Adult EducaHon 


















1700. Summer School 


5,208 


.00 


4,00C 


.00 


4,000. 


00 






Contingency Fund 


















,6?j^Aiipa50»- Ind.Arts & Home Ec. 


19,535 


.00 


80,000 


.00 


" 




aUjUuu. 


uu 


Supplemental Approp. 


















iQnn- TTQFA 8Q-in 


3,619 


.00 


3.619 


.00 


3,619. 


00 














1 








TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 


1.933,136 


.00 


4,582,220 


.0014.144,786. 


00 


116,393. 


00 



*FCDERAI. « DISTRICT FUNDS 



SECTION II 






ESTIMATED REVENUES i 


REVENUES 8c CREDITS AVAILABLE 
TO REDUCE SCHOOL TAXES 


APPROVED 
REVENUES 

1971-72 


SCHOOL BOARDS 

BUDGET 

1 972-73 


BUDGET 

COMMITTEE 

1 972-73 


UNENCUMBERED BALANCE 


18,451. 


50 


6,873. 


21 


6,873 


.21 


Revenue from State Sources: 


X X X X 


X 


X X X X 


X 


X X X X 


X 


Sweepstakes 


7,878. 


33 


14,697. 


54 


14,697 


.54 


Foundation Aid 


54,196. 


)0 


55,545. 


00 


55,545 


.00 


School Building Aid 


11, 109. i 


^0 


32,100. 


00 


32,100 


.00 


Area Vocational School 














Driver Education 














Intellectually Retarded 










































Revenue from Federal Sources: 


X X X X 


X 


X X X X 


X 


X X X X 


X 


NDEA-Title Ill-Science, Math & Lang. 














NDEA-Tltle V-Guidance i Testing 














Vocational Education 














National Forest Reserve 














Flood Control 














Sch. Lunch & Special Milk Program 


4,000. 


)0 


8,000. 


30 


8,000 


,00 


PL815 (Impacted Area-Cap. Outlay) 














PL 874 (Impacted Area-Cur. Oper.) 


3,000. 


)0 


- 




- 




PL8<>-lO(ESEA) 


3,619. 


)0 


3,619. 


30 


3,619 


,00 






























Local Revenue Except Taxes: 


X X X X 


X 


X X XX 


X 


X X X X 


X 


Tuition 














Trust Fund Income 














Rent 














Other Revenue from Local Sources 


100.1 


)0 


100. 


30 


100 


00 
















Bonds-Notes & Capital Res. Funds: 


X X X X 


X 


X X X X 


X 


X X X X 


X 


Bond or Note Issues 


550.000.1 


)0 


1.800.000. 


30 


2,500,000 


00 


Withdrawals from Cap. Res. Funds 














TOTAL SCHOOL REVENUES and CREDITS 


652,355.: 


.3 


!, 920, 934. 


75 


2,620,934 


75 


niCTPirT ASSESSMENT -m- ^ 


,280,780.1 


57 


,661,285. 


15 


1,523,851 


25 




TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS , 933 , 136 . 00 L 582 , 220 . 


30 


4,144,786 


00 





Detail on items under Capital Outlay in 1972-73 Budget to be financed by bonds, notes and/or withdrawals from 
capital reserve funds: 



PURPOSE 



AMOUNT 



New High School 



$2,800,000.00 



1972-73 BUDGET OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT 

OF PEUIAM , N. H. 

nat«> February 16, ^^j^ 



Budget Committee: 

Marianne H. Thompson 



Robert Fletcher 



Daniel 


s. 


Atwood , 


Jr. 


Robert 


K. 


Fisher 




Donald 


E. 


Brock 




Larry 1 


fl. 


Ormsby 




James 


E. 


Powers 





Austin Burns 



James White 



Lawrence Hince 



John Laval lee 



INSTRUCTIONS FOR COMPLETING FORM 

SECTION I — APPROPRIATIONS. Enter the budget as approved by the Tax Commission under the 
columns headed Budget 1971-72. Enter all regular and special appropriations including special ap- 
propriations to be financed by bonds, notes and withdrawals from capital reserve funds in the column 
headed Budget 1972-73. Offsetting items for the latter items are to be made in SECTION II — REV- 
ENUES AND CREDITS. Deficit or Supplemental Appropriations are to be entered in the Space provided. 
A deficit appropriation is made in the case where there there are insufficient revenues available or an- 
ticipated prior to the close of the school year from which the appropriations as voted may be financed 
and will require an additional tax levy. A supplemental appropriation is made in the case where excess 
general fund revenues are available or anticipated before the end of the school year from which the ap- 
propriations may be financed and will not require additional funds to be raised by taxation. In the case 
of a "supplemental" appropriation offset the amount in SECTION II by writing in "offset to supplemental 
appropriation" on the blank line immediately following the caption Other Revenue from Local Sources. 
The total appropriations actually voted by the school district meeting to be raised by taxation, cannot 
exceed by ten percent (10%) the total appropriation as recommended by the Budget Committee, less 
amounts to be raised by bond and long term notes issued and withdrawals from capital reserve funds. 

CONTINGENCY FUND (RSA 198:4b) Every school district annually by an article in the warrant and the 
governing body of a city upon recommendation of the school board, when the operating of the schools 
is by a department of the city, may establish a contingency fund to meet the cost of unanticipated ex- 
penses that may arise during the year. Such fund shall not exceed one per cent of the amount ap- 
propriated for school purposes, exclusive of capital expenditures and amortization of debt, during the 
preceding year. A detailed report of all expenditures from the contingency fund shall be made annually 
by the school board and published with their report. 

SECTION n — ESTIMATED REVENUES AND CREDITS. Enter in Column 1, Budget 1971-72, the revenues 
and credits as revised and approved by the Tax Commission in setting the 1971-72 school assessment. 
Enter in Column 2 the best estimate of 1972-73 revenue available at the time of preparation of the 
budget. 

DISTRICT ASSESSMENT. Items submitted without recommendations by the Budget Committee (Column 
4, page 2) are not to be included in arriving at the district assessment. If any of the items submitted 
\Arithout recommendation are voted they will be accounted for in the report of vote to be submitted by 
the school district clerk following the annual meeting. 

The district assessment from towns and cities is obtained by deducting the total school revenues and 
credits from the total amount actually voted (Column 3, Section I). Balance report by adding the total 
revenues and credits to the district assessment. 



office of the Selectmen Bulk Rate 

Pelham, N.H. 03076 Postage Paid 

Permit # 4 
Pelham, N.H. 03076 



RFD BOX HOLDER 
STAR ROUTE OR 
P.O. BOX HOLDER 
LOCAL